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Movie Stills of the Night: Jack Lemmon, Shirley MacLaine, in Billy Wilder’s (1960) ‘The Apartment’

a-bw-15
[Some Like It Wilder: The Life and Controversial Films of Billy Wilder]a-bw-04[Fred MacMurray by Charles Tranberg at Amazon]a-bw-02[Some Like It Cool: The Charmed Life of Jack Lemmon]a-bw-03[The Apartment - Blu Ray at Amazon]IMG_0265[Billy Wilder, Movie-Maker: Critical Essays on the Films]

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Gold Medalist Tweets ‘Olympic’ Onion Rings

 


[VIDEO] Obama: “…when you’re young, and you’re eating raw men all the time”

 

Video: “Raw men”? « The Greenroom


Presidential Historian: Coca-Cola’s Revised Ad Shows Americans Still See Country as ‘Melting Pot’

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Michael Patrick Leahy  reports:  In an exclusive interview with Breitbart News, presidential historian Craig Shirley said that Coca-Cola’s decision to revise their controversial “America the Beautiful” ad and specifically reference America’s unofficial motto, “E Pluribus Unum,” in the ad’s opening segment shows that the company quickly understood their original ad missed the mark with the majority of Americans.

“The storm of opposition to Coke’s infamously tasteless ad shows that a vast majority of Americans still see this country as a melting pot and not a gaggle of entitled special interest groups…”

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Revisiting the Alienation of Labor

men-work

“Capitalism is what happens when property rights are respected — nothing more, nothing less. It is the voluntary self-organization of economic affairs.”

williamsonKevin D. Williamson  writes:  ‘What is most striking about our collective plight today is how much it resembles the problem we face as individuals.” That striking insight comes from David Loy in The Great Awakening: A Buddhist Social Theory. That problem, he writes, is a sense of separation of the self from the outside world, which brings with it feelings of frustration and powerlessness. Mr. Loy offers the familiar Buddhist diagnosis, that the feeling of separation is “a delusion that causes us to seek happiness by eliotquotemanipulating the world in order to get what we want from it, which just tends to reinforce the sense of separation.” Mr. Loy is a very engaging writer, though Americans who are attracted to Buddhism as a sort of un-religion might note that he is an “authorized teacher in the Sanbo Kyodan lineage of Japanese Zen Buddhism.” American Buddhist journals have a fascinating fascination with religious titles and pedigrees — abbot of this in the lineage of that — and a positively Clementine emphasis on apostolic succession: all of the grandeur and hierarchy of the Catholic Church without your judgmental Irish grandmother.

[The Great Awakening: A Buddhist Social Theory at Amazon]

[Kevin D. Williamson's book The End Is Near and It's Going to Be Awesome, is a pundit planet favorite, you can get it at Amazon]

At the risk of doing an injustice to Mr. Loy’s argument, the fullness of which cannot easily be communicated in this limited space, it must be understood that the thing that worries him here is not optional. “Manipulating the world in order to get what we want from it” is a pretty good definition of work, which is fundamental to our lives, so much so that in most of the ancient religions it is regulated in much the same way as sex and diet. Buddhism has a very developed philosophy of work — “right livelihood” being one of the requirements of the Eightfold Path — while the Christian story of the Fall is in the end an attempt to explain why we must labor: “Dust thou art, and unto dust shalt thou return.” What happens in the meantime? “In the sweat of thy face shalt thou eat bread.” The message is the same elsewhere: The literal meaning of “karma” is “work.”

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Bitch-Slapping Billionaire George: Soros Victim of ‘Knockout’ Punch by Ex-Girlfriend

George Soros stellt Buch zur Finanzkrise vor

Robert Wilde reports:  In a variation of the nationwide “Knockout Game,” billionaire ultra liberal George Soros’s ex-girlfriend suckerpunched him in the head during a deposition in their palimony law suit.

In a vivid display of profanity, Adriana Ferreyr, a South American soap actress, screamed at the Hungarian- born businessman, calling him an “a–hole!” and a “piece of s–t!” For good measure, she knocked the glasses off his California lawyer Martin Singer, berated his other lawyer William Zabel, and then scorched her own high powered attorney William Beslow with more obscene language, according to papers filed Friday by Singer.

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Why Has Israel Come to Occupy So Much of the Left’s Attention?

Haifa University in Israel. Photograph: David King

Haifa University in Israel. Photograph: David King

Why Israel?

Claude S. Fischer writes:  Why Israel?—that is, why boycott Israel and not, say, China?—has become a central question in the bitter arguments over the Boycott, Divestment, and Sanctions (BDS) movement. The latest brawl followed the decision of the American Studies Association to endorse a boycott of Israeli academic institutions, its first and only such endorsement. The question of why Israel has arisen over boycotting Israeli scholars, Israeli companies, Israeli hummus, American companies that sell to Israel, Israeli music venues, and so on.

That Westerners of Arab, Muslim, or Jewish heritage get involved (on both sides) might be taken for granted; many have deep personal commitments. But why do so many leftish Americans and Europeans who have no personal stake in the Palestine-Israel conflict focus on it? To be clear, the question is not one of justification—whether Israeli policymakers or the boycotters and other critics have moral standing for the positions they hold. What concerns me here is explanation: Why has Israel come to occupy so much of the left’s attention?

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Vintage Advertising Image of the Day: 7-Up

7-up-ad

Retrogasm


Massachusetts Democrat Expelled from State House after Conviction for Assaulting a Woman

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Katherine Connell  reports:  Yesterday the Massachusetts state house voted, 146–5, to expel Representative Carlos Henriquez, a Democrat who was convicted in January of assaulting a woman.

expel7n-3-webThough Boston Mayor Martin Walsh and Governor Deval Patrick had called on Henriquez to resign following his conviction, the New England branch of the NAACP, an organization of which Henriquez is a member, was not inclined to pass judgment, and sent an open letter to members of the house urging them to vote against or abstain from voting on the measure.

“The House of Representatives must respect the Massachusetts judicial process and let Representative Henriquez’s case before the Appeals Court proceed, without jumping to judgment before the appellate decision is rendered,” NAACP New England president Juan Cofield wrote in the February 6 letter. “Secondly, while NEAC respects the jury’s decision, there is currently no rule for expulsion that applies to misdemeanor convictions.”

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Vintage Sci-Fi Illustration of the Day “Moon of Hatred: Era of Monsters”

sci-fi-planet

Translated –  “Moon of Hatred: Era of Monsters”


Actor Who Played Crime Dog Scruff McGruff Gets Prison Term in Texas

busted-dogOUT: McGruff the Crime Dog

IN: McGruff the Criminal Dog

GALVESTON, Texas, Feb. 8 (UPI) — A Texas actor whose big role was McGruff, the crime-fighting dog, was sentenced to 16 years in prison this week for drug and gun crimes.

John Morales, 41, pleaded guilty in federal court Monday to McGruffcharges of running a sizable marijuana grow at his home in Galveston and possessing an arsenal of 27 firearms and a military grenade launcher, court documents said.

NBC News said Morales were arrested in 2011 by Galveston police who stopped him for speeding. The Houston Chronicle said a quantity of marijuana seeds plus diagrams of the grow set-up were discovered in the vehicle.

McGruff was a cartoon bloodhound who wore a trench coat and was the mascot of the National Crime Prevention Council. The real-life version of McGruff was a costumed character who made personal appearances to build crime awareness among children.

Breitbart.com


[VIDEO] Crony Clown Theater: Watch What Happens When Obama Picks a Top Donor as Ambassador

This is why a future president might finally do away with the practice of nominating a top political donor to be an ambassador.

Tsunis-Pelosi

Here’s how the White House described wealthy executive George Tsunis when President Barack Obama nominated him to be the top U.S. diplomat in Norway in September 2013:

“George J. Tsunis is the Founder, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Chartwell Hotels, LLC. From 1999 to 2009, Mr. Tsunis was of counsel at Rivkin Radler, LLP and served as partner since 2005. Mr. Tsunis was Special Counsel to the Town of Huntington Committee on Open Space Preservation as well as Counsel to the Dix Hills Water District from 2003 to 2009. From 1998 to 1999, he practiced law at Goldberg & Cohen in Brooklyn, NY. From 1996 to 1998, he was a Legislative Attorney at the New York City Council. Mr. Tsunis received a B.A. from New York University and a J.D. from St. John’s University School of Law.”

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Celebrating a Century of Murder and Suffering: Soviet Communist Nostalgia at the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics


The Campus Utopians

campus-utopia

The Left seems to think you can change reality the way you change your major.

Jonah Goldberg writes:  A few years ago, I shot a man in Reno just to watch him die. But that’s not important right now. Around that time, I also wrote a piece for the magazine about the new utopianism of American liberalism. In short, I think you can judge every progressive “ism” by its Utopia. What’s vexing about contemporary liberalism is that it doesn’t admit its Utopia forthrightly. The Marxists were honest about the dream of the classless society blooming from the withered-away state.

[Jonah Goldberg's latest book: “The Tyranny of Cliches” is available at Amazon.]

The Social Gospel progressives openly promised to create a “Kingdom of Heaven” on earth (Obama did once slip and say that we can create a “Kingdom here on earth,” but he’s usually let his followers fill-in-the-blank about why, exactly, we are the ones we’ve been waiting for). To their credit, the transhumanist types are honest about their utopianism; that glorious day when we can download our brains into X-boxes and Vulcan mind-meld with the toaster.

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NBC: ‘Making Lies Sound Truthful and Murder Respectable’

NBC Praises Communism as One of History’s ‘Pivotal Experiments’

4349565134_nbc_communist_logo_answer_3_xlarge“The towering presence, the empire that ascended to affirm a colossal footprint. The revolution that birthed one of modern history’s pivotal experiments. But if politics has long shaped our sense of who they are, it’s passion that endures. As a more reliable right to their collective heart. What they build in aspirations lifted by imagination. What they craft, through the wonder of every last detail. How magical the fusion of sound and movement can be. How much a glass of distilled perfection and an overflowing table can matter. Discover the Russian people through these indelible signatures. Discover what we share with them through the games that open here tonight.”

George Orwellcall your office. As he wrote in “Politics and the English Language, in 1946, such euphemisms are “designed to make lies sound truthful and murder respectable,” and certainly describing Communism as “one of modern history’s pivotal experiments” fits the bill in spades.

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[VIDEO] BBC America’s “Fleming: The Man Who Would Be Bond”

I saw the pilot, it’s a promising series. Good cast, great premise. Good acting, period details. If you’ve not seen it yet, check it out, the first two episodes are still repeating on BBC America

BBC AMERICA’s Fleming: The Man Who Would Be Bond takes a no holds barred look at Ian Fleming, the man behind the 007 legend whose real life was as exciting, eventful and sexually charged as his famous creation.

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There’s no questioning the iconic status of the man they call 007, but before his thrilling adventures hit the page or screen, they were experienced first-hand by author-to-be, Ian Fleming. Stylish and explosive – Fleming: The Man Who Would Be Bond tells the fascinating story of the man whose own life and escapades were the inspiration for one of the most iconic figures in modern literature – James Bond. The new original four-part drama stars Dominic Cooper (Captain America: The Winter Soldier) as Fleming, a charming and sophisticated maverick, whose pleasure-seeking life was turned around by WWII and led to the creation of the greatest spy the world has ever known. Fleming: The Man Who Would Be Bondpremieres Wednesday, January 29, 10:00pm ET/PT as part of BBC AMERICA’s Dramaville.

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[VIDEO] Christina Hoff Sommers: Debunking The Gender Wage Gap Myth

The wage gap myth, most recently used by President Obama during the State of the Union Address, states that women make only 77 cents to every dollar that men earn. AEI resident scholar Christina Hoff Sommers debunks the bogus statistic.

More here…

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Dylan Farrow Fights Back: Responds to Woody Allen’s Op-Ed ‘…Distortions and Outright Lies’

dylan-farrow-woody-allen-600x450 Dylan Farrow has responded to an op-ed Woody Allen published by The New York Times Friday.

In the response, provided to The Hollywood Reporter, Farrow denounced Allen’s op-ed — in which he suggested Farrow’s mother, Mia Farrow, had coached her to accuse Allen of sexually assaulting her as a child.

“I have never wavered in describing what he did to me. I will carry the memories of surviving these experiences for the rest of my life,” Farrow said.

She went on to challenge other points in Allen’s op-ed, calling it ‘the latest rehash of the same legalese, distortions, and outright lies he has leveled at me for the past 20 years.”

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Rise of the Libertarians

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10 reasons why Slate, Salon and the progressive media are afraid

Max Borders writes:  A lot of people are messing with libertarianism. We get it. If you see an alternative worldview gaining currency as your own is starting to lose out: attack, attack, attack. Strategically, it’s probably smart.

When Jane Mayer wrote that sloppy hit piece for The New Yorker against the Brothers Koch a few years back, it was way more strategic than personal: These are the folks who give money to organizations that don’t agree with you about lots of things. If you want to weaken those groups, villainize the funders by any means necessary to make their donations toxic.

the_libertarian_plot_sticker-refecfbfb70314a6b92b50b97a0b7c25f_v9i40_8byvr_512Well played. The bigger problem for progressives, however, is that libertarianism has grown far larger than any billionaire’s money. So you have to do still more to kill the movement. At the very least that means using heaping helpings of intellectual dishonesty. Can you swiftboat a movement?

In a recent New York Times piece profiling Rand Paul, Sam Tanenhaus and Jim Rutenberg write that libertarians are a bunch of “antitax activists and war protestors, John Birch Society members, and a smatter of truthers who suspect the government’s hand in the 2001 terrorist attacks.” Why would the Times not instead describe folks like Times columnist Tyler Cowen, Nobel Laureate Vernon Smith, Whole Foods CEO John Mackey, or investor Peter Thiel? That’s not part of the narrative.

Let’s get to the heart of the matter: Progressives are afraid. Read the rest of this entry »


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