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Vintage Pulp Fiction Book Cover Art of the Day: Behind the Iron Curtain

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[Graphic] Defense: How to Escape Zip Ties

ZipTieEscape


House Lights the Torch, Turns Up the Heat: Criminal Charges for Lois Lerner?

Too late now to plead the Fifth?

The Oversight Committee will vote on Thursday on whether to issue her a contempt citation for obstructing its investigation

Eliana Johnson reports:  The House Ways and Means Committee, led by outgoing chairman Dave Camp, will vote this week to ask the Department of Justice to pursue criminal charges against former Internal Revenue Service employee Lois Lerner.

“The Congress will take up that contempt resolution. If she’s not going to tell us the truth, the House will hold her in contempt.”

– House Speaker John Boehner

In an executive session on Wednesday, Camp’s panel will mark up a letter to attorney general Eric Holder that outlines “one or more crimes” it claims Lerner committed, based on evidence the committee uncovered in its investigation, while the agency was inappropriately targeting tea-party groups.

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When Art Meets Social Media

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A Ukrainian artist has given the pieces of the great Edward Hopper a 21st-century touch-up. Nastya Nudnik, of Kiev, decided to insert social media symbols and emojis into the artist’s paintings. “I realized that some of his characters deserve the right to be more active and dynamic.”

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The Metropolitan Museum of Art writes that the works of Hopper, who died in 1967, are “pervaded by a sense of silence and estrangement.”

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[AUDIO] NSFW: MSNBC’s Ed Schultz Goes Cuckoo-Bananas on Caller, Drops F-Bomb Before Censors Catch It

If your computer volume is up and unsuspecting people are standing nearby, you might want to adjust the volume before hitting “play” on this YouTube clip. Schultz lets it rip.

From NRO‘s Andrew Johnson:

Censors failed to bleep out Ed Schultz’s profane outburst on his radio show when the MSNBC host lashed out at a caller during a heated discussion.

“I hope that they didn’t go out — did we catch that one? I need some direction! Did we catch that one? Yes or no?”

The fiery caller accused Schultz of “fascism” and for “capitulating” to people who are benefiting from the worsening state of affairs, prompting Schultz to say he hoped that caller didn’t “have a stroke…”(read more)

National Review Online


TV: Tim Cavanaugh Reviews AMC’s “Turn”

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The birth of American espionage gets AMC’s prestige spot

Tim Cavanaugh has a review (or is it a preview?) of AMC‘s “Turn”, here’s a preview of his review. Read the full item here.

For NROTim Cavanaugh writes: Like Archie Andrews and many other American men who will follow him, Abraham Woodhull has great regard for the blonde, but he lusts for the brunette. Married to porcelain Mary, Abraham nevertheless manages to spend ample time in the presence of smoldering Anna, a childhood friend for whom he still carries a torch. Heroic circumstance, on British-occupied Long Island in the fall of 1776, will put Abraham into close contact with Anna. Anna’s husband in turn languishes in Redcoat custody, leaving her with little choice but to welcome any male support against the masher who has occupied her house, a Malfoyesque English captain.

[The source book, Washington's Spies: The Story of America's First Spy Ring is available at Amazon]

We know about these folks, who will form part of the Revolution’s Culper spy ring in AMC’s new Sunday show Turn, in large part thanks to the 2007 book  Washington’s Spies: The Story of America’s First Spy Ring by National Review alumnus Alexander Rose. In the show’s press materials, Rose praises Turn’s creators for exploring “these very human factors lying at the heart of that titanic clash of nations and ideologies” and for their “creation of an alien and often startling world.”

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Vintage Image of the Night: Strip Tease on Conveyor Belt, Tokyo, 1957

A stripper at a Tokyo striptease show is taken past the audience on a moving conveyor belt. 1957

A stripper at a Tokyo striptease show is taken past the audience on a moving conveyor belt, 1957.

This reveals as much about mid-20th Century post-war industrial history as it does about a form of entertainment as old as human history.

vintage everyday


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