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A Washington Gossip Column About Washington Gossip Columns

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Google executive chairman Eric Schmidt attended a party thrown by Google and the Hollywood Reporter on the eve of the 2014 White House Correspondents’ Association Dinner. Jonathan Ernst/Reuters

This Washington Post article is self-serving and shallow. But it’s written by a Politico hack, about Washington D.C. What else would we expect?

Patrick W. Gavin was a reporter at Politico from 2009 to 2014 and is currently at work on a documentary about the White House Correspondents’ Association Dinner.

Patrick W. Gavin writes:

It’s not been a good few years for the Washington gossip industry.

Politico, my home for five years before I left recently to pursue documentary filmmaking, once had six journalists — myself included — writing for its “Click” gossip section. All of us left over the years, and the section was disbanded in December.

“Gossip columns may be dying off, but gossip reconceived as a zero-calorie giggle nugget is alive and well.”

If Politico, whose success has been driven by its aggressive coverage of every move in Washington, has decided that there’s no more water to be squeezed from that rock, then trust me, it must be dry.

“The gossip hasn’t gone away — it’s gone mainstream.”

Look around. While long-standing columns such as The Washington Post’s “In the Loop” and The Reliable Source and U.S. News’s Washington Whispers are still around, many of their brethren are gone. The Washington Examiner folded its “Yeas & Nays” column. The Hill killed its “Washington Scene” section. Roll Call trimmed the staff of its “Heard on the Hill” column in half. The once-titillating Wonkette.com has turned away from snarky stories of Capitol Hill liaisons and toward snarky takes on actual policy. TMZ said it would start TMZDC.com in 2007; the site has yet to launch. Read the rest of this entry »

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Robert Spencer: 5 Things Media & Government Won’t Tell You About Boko Haram

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Why was Hillary Clinton’s State Department so notoriously slow to recognize a terrorist group?

5. The abduction of the schoolgirls is only the latest in a huge string of atrocities.

The world has only begun to notice them because of the abduction of the schoolgirls, but the Nigerian jihad terror group Boko Haram has been around for years. Without attracting the international outrage they have drawn upon themselves now, they have committed innumerable acts of unimaginable savagery,murdering over 2,500 people in the first three months of 2014 alone andtorching numerous churches and Christian homes.

At my website Jihad Watch a Google search turns up about 115,000 results for “Boko Haram,” indicating that anyone who has been tracking jihad activity over the last few years has had plenty to track in Boko Haram, and that the outrage over the abducted schoolgirls, as welcome as it is if it results in genuine action to stop this brutal and bloody group, is quite late and arbitrary.

Of course, in the Obama administration it hasn’t been fashionable to talk about jihad activity other than within the context of al Qaeda, and Boko Haram is not al Qaeda. Therefore it essentially did not exist (either for the administration or for the mainstream media that it carries around in its pocket like so many nickels), or if it did, it wasn’t a terrorist group: Hillary Clinton’s State Department wasnotoriously slow to designate it as such, even as the dead bodies piled up.

4. Their real name is Party of the People of the Sunnah for Dawah and Jihad.

Boko Haram means “Western education is sin,” or more literally, “Books bad.” The mainstream media has reported this as if the group were a bunch of Luddites with AK-47s – people who for some unexplained reason object to modern technology except for the weaponry. But actually the moniker “Boko Haram” is a specifically Islamic name, referring to the sinfulness of any system of education that is not based and centered upon the Qur’an and Islam.

And the actual name of the group is not Boko Haram at all; it is the Party of the People of the Sunnah for Dawah and Jihad. Sunnah is accepted Islamic practice as derived from the Qur’an and Hadith; dawah is Islamic proselytizing; and jihad, of course, is (according to mainstream Islamic tradition) primarily warfare against unbelievers in order to establish the hegemony of Islamic law. Clearly, then, the group’s focus and motivation is entirely Islamic – which is probably why the media never calls the group by its actual name: too much focus on Islam in connection with terrorism is, for the media, as verboten for today’s media as it would have been for Der Stürmer to run a piece favorable to Jews. Read the rest of this entry »


[PHOTO] Hitchcock and His Scripts, 1966

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Out There Films


[VIDEO] Gowdy: Democrats’ ‘Selective Amnesia’ About Fundraising on Tragedies

On Fox News Sunday, Representative Trey Gowdy R-SC, the newly appointed chair of the Houses Benghazi select committee, accused Democrats of having “selective amnesia” when it came to fundraising off of tragedies, arguing they had no problem raising funds from everything from Hurricane Katrina to Sandy Hook.

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[VIDEO] Ponnuru: Hillary Clinton Has Struggled to Answer What Her Biggset Accomplishment Is

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A Message from Frank Zappa

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For all you Mothers out there…

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Rep Mike Rogers: ‘You Can’t Base Your Policy on What’s Trending on Twitter’

The administration is right to address the kidnapping of hundreds of young girls in Nigeria, but its decision to not designate Boko Haram as a terrorist group years ago displays a failure to take these foreign policy issues seriously, says Representative Mike Rogers (R., Mich.).

“You can’t base your policy on what’s trending on Twitter. It has to be more than hashtags and selfies.”

Rogers outlined other examples of threats and dangerous situations abroad that are largely going unaddressed under this administration, particularly those affecting and harming women…(read more)

National Review Online


Will: I Can’t Believe Adults Use Hashtag Foreign Policy, ‘An Exercise in Self-Esteem’

“Are these barbarians in the wilds of Nigeria supposed to check their Twitter accounts and say, ‘Uh oh, Michelle Obama is very cross with us — we better change our behavior’?” 

George Will doesn’t quite understand the thinking behind the first lady’s recent tweet in which she used the hashtag #BringBackOurGirls, referencing the Boko Haram kidnapping of Nigerian girls.

“It’s an exercise in self-esteem. I do not know how adults stand there, facing a camera, and say, ‘Bring back our girls.’”

In March, the State Department engaged in a similar strategy to signal its support for Ukraine by tweeting a picture of spokeswoman Jen Psaki with the hashtag #UnitedForUkraine.

 “Power is the ability to achieve intended effects, and this is not intended to have any effect on the real world.” 

 

Review Online


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