[PHOTO] Lightning And Rainbow Captured Together In Once In A Lifetime Shot

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Julija Televičiūtė writes: It’s been 7 years since Greg McCown has been trying to photograph a lightning bolt and rainbow in one shot. The spectacular image the 42-year-old- real estate salesperson saw once when driving to work in Arizona left such an impression that he knew he had to shoot it someday. He finally succeeded….(read more)

Source: Bored Panda


‘Confessions Of A Chinatown Moll’

chinatown-moll

Confessions Of A Chinatown Moll 

Source: 


Best. Headline. Ever. 

spacing

Emma Seppälä writes: We believe that the opposite of focus— daydreaming, goofing off, spacing out— is to be avoided. Worse yet, having problems focusing is seen as an obstacle to overcome and even as pathological. Self- help books and productivity bloggers strive to keep us on task with advice and hacks.

When we fail to come up with the results we were hoping for, we wonder whether we just aren’t working or concentrating hard enough. We’ve come to consider focus and being on as “good,” and idleness— especially if it goes on for too long— as “bad” and unproductive. We feel guilty if we spend too much time doing nothing.

But in thinking this way, we make a fundamental mistake.

[Order “The Happiness Track: How to Apply the Science of Happiness to Accelerate Your Success” from Amazon.com]

Truly successful people don’t come up with great ideas through focus alone. They are successful because they make time to not concentrate and to engage in a broad array of activities like playing golf.

As a consequence, they think inventively and are profoundly creative: they develop innovative solutions to problems and connect dots in brilliant ways. Dwight Eisenhower logged more hours on the golf course than any other U.S. president yet is also regarded as one of the best presidents this country has ever had. Read the rest of this entry »


Poster: ‘Jazz West Coast’

jazz


[VIDEO] The Geography of Genius: Why Some Places are Better at Fostering Creativity 

Renaissance Florence, Enlightenment Edinburgh, Mozart‘s Vienna: why have certain places at certain times created such monumental leaps in thought and innovation? This is the question at the heart of travel writer Eric Weiner‘s latest book, The Geography of Genius: A Search for the World’s Most Creative Places, From Ancient Athens to Silicon Valley.

“This is a book about process, about how creative genius happens and what are the circumstances,” Weiner explains. “I believe in the power of place and the power of culture to shape our lives in unexpected ways.”

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Traveling the globe, Weiner looked at the locations and cultures that fostered history’s greatest minds. Through his research he pieced together a list of ingredients he believes played a vital role in creating these “genius clusters,” including money, diversity, competition, and disorder.

“A little bit of chaos is good,” says Weiner. “The pot has to be stirred. If you are fully invested in the status quo—either as a person or a place—you are unlikely to create genius because you are too comfortable.”

Thomas_Jefferson's_Monticello

So can a government build a city that will generate the geniuses of tomorrow? Weiner thinks not. “I wish I could sit here and tell you that there was a formula and if you applied that formula you could create the next Silicon Valley,” he says. “There is no formula.”

About 8:30 minutes.

Camera by Austin Bragg and Joshua Swain. Hosted and edited by Meredith Bragg.


[VIDEO] Tal Wilkenfeld: Live at Namm Show, 2016

Live at Namm show 2016 (may be incomplete)


Soasig Chamaillard


Fumi no Kiyogaki 文の清書き Print Artist: Chokyosai Eiri (鳥橋斎 栄里)1801


Michael Kupperman, from ‘Tales Designed to Thrizzle’ Vol. 2

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The 1953 Studebaker Commander Starliner

The 1953 Studebaker Commander Starliner was influenced by this concept design.


‘Diana’, Augustus Saint-Gaudens 1892-93

diana-statue


Author of Benghazi Book Mitchell Zuckoff Stands by Pivotal ‘Stand-Down’ Scene

Bay

Jocelyn Noveck reports: “Stand down,” says the actor playing the CIA station chief in Michael Bay‘s new film, “13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi.” He’s speaking to the security team that wants to go help Americans under siege less than a mile away in a U.S. diplomatic compound under fierce attack. His order keeps the team from leaving for a crucial 20 minutes, before they decide to ignore him and go anyway.

“We worked very hard to get the facts right from the research of the book that Mitch did to the amazing access I have from working 20 years with the military, from the boots on the ground, the people who were in country to the CIA, at a high-level meeting to get just the facts right, the recently released emails. We just had to get it right.”

— Director Michael Bay

It’s the pivotal — and most controversial — scene in the new film, a movie that Bay insists steers clear of politics, but which is bound to spark much political discussion nonetheless. On Friday — the movie’s opening day — the Washington Post quoted the now-retired CIA station chief, identified only as Bob, as strongly denying he ever issued such an order or anything like it.

“There never was a stand-down order,” the base chief was quoted by the Post as saying. “At no time did I ever second-guess that the team would depart.”

The author of the book upon which the film is based, Mitchell Zuckoff, stood by his depiction of the scene on Friday, saying in a telephone interview with The Associated Press that he’d based it on several firsthand accounts. Zuckoff collaborated on his book, “13 Hours,” with some of the surviving security contractors.

[Read the full story here, at US News]

“It’s not credible what he’s claiming,” Zuckoff said of the station chief, whom he said he had tried to interview when writing the book, but his request was denied.

Four Americans died in the attacks, including U.S. Ambassador Christopher Stevens. Read the rest of this entry »


Pulp Fiction Cover: ‘Die by Night’

die-by-night


‘Liberté, Sécurité’: French Poster, 2015 


‘A Creature of Uncontrollable Compulsions’

Liz

Liz


[VIDEO] David Bowie: ‘Young Americans’ 


[VIDEO] The Wizard of Oz Alphabetical Cut 

“This film contains extremely fast editing, flashes of light, abrupt changes in image and sound.” 

The Wizard of Oz in alphabetical order? Preposterous? Maybe. Genius? Also likely. You decide when you watch this video of the entire film recut so that all the words spoken play in alphabetical order….

Vimeo user Matt Bucy

Source: EW.com


The Whimsical World of James Yang

See more here!

Post by @IllustrationAge.

Source: The Whimsical World of James Yang | ILLUSTRATION AGE


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