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Cragstan Astronaut: Vintage Japanese Toy

Astronaut-Toy

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Pulp Fiction: ‘Monte Carlo Mission’

Monte-Carlo

killercoversoftheweek


[VIDEO] Scariest Voice in the World? Russian Sports Fan Lets Loose Animal Roar to Support Her Team, Terrify Humanity

Source:  – Rocketnews24


[PHOTO] Louis Armstrong in London,1970

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Louis Armstrong in London, October 28th, 1970

(Photo by Express/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)


[PHOTO] Pundit Planet’s West Coast Correspondent Robert Holguin Now Channeling State-of-the-Art Turbo Power

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Behind the Curtain at the New York Times

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Herbie Hancock and Miles Davis, Amsterdam 1964

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[VIDEO] Greatest NFL Catch of All Time? Odell Beckham Jr’s One-Handed Feat

 


Vintage Fiction: ‘Science Wonder Stories’

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The Wonders of Space


[PHOTO] Audrey Hepburn on the Set of ‘Breakfast at Tiffany’s’, 1963

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Mural: The Least-Popular Guys in America

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“Quickly becoming DC’s most wince-inducing mural”

– daveweigel


[VIDEO] SNL Cold Open: Obama Shoves The Schoolhouse Rock Bill Down The Capitol Steps

November 22, 2014 – Finally, the first biting political spoof from Saturday Night Live in a while: the Bill from Schoolhouse Rock explains to a student how he becomes a law, only to be violently beat up by Barack Obama and his new best friend, “Executive Order.” Even then, the poor Executive Order still thinks he’s used for simple things, like declaring holidays and creating national parks, until Obama informs him that he’s going to be used to grant amnesty to 5 million undocumented immigrants. His only reaction: “Whoa.”


[PHOTO] Django Reinhardt, Stephane Grappelli and Dizzy Gillespie

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Django Reinhardt, Stephane Grappelli and Dizzy Gillespie


[PHOTO] Natalie Wood

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[VIDEO] Tal Wilkenfeld: ‘Chelsea Hotel’

 “Chelsea Hotel” written by Leonard Cohen, performed by Tal Wilkenfeld on Nov 9th, 2013 at the Henry Fonda Theater, Los Angeles.


The Sounds of Silence

Graduate


‘He Has His Father’s Eyes’

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Mia Farrow, Rosemary’s Baby 1968


[PHOTO] Audrey Hepburn on the Set of ‘Breakfast at Tiffany’s’, 1961

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Critic’s Notebook: Todd McCarthy Reflects on the Film Career of Mike Nichols

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Todd McCarthy writes: Mike Nichols is such a great talker, my first desire after reading The Hollywood Reporter’s current skipping-stone account of his theatrical directing career is to buy his own 20-disc recording of the autobiography he unfortunately hasn’t written yet.

My second desire is to see Death of a Salesman before it closes.

My third is to know: Who is Mike Nichols?

As Meryl Streep attests, he always is “the smartest and most brilliant person in the room.” I spent a couple of hours with him many years ago, a memorable encounter that directly led to my first job in Hollywood — as assistant to his former partner, Elaine May. At the time, Nichols was preparing to direct the film version of The Last Tycoon, a project that eventually passed to his self-proclaimed idol, Elia Kazan, while Nichols moved on to The Fortune. This sequence of events didn’t work out well for either of them; it was the end for Kazan, and Nichols didn’t direct another dramatic feature for nearly a decade.

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Nichols’ best films, in order:

ANGELS IN AMERICA (2003) Nichols’ distinct talents for stage and screen merge perfectly in this superlative adaptation of one of the great American epic plays. Jeffrey Wright and Al Pacino are out of this world in it.

CARNAL KNOWLEDGE (1971) With a terrific Jules Feiffer script (originally written as a play) and a bold visual style, this bracing study of men’s attitudes toward women is probably the director’s most probing, self-revelatory film.

THE GRADUATE (1967) Still funny and sharp-edged after all these years, it’s one of the great zeitgeist films of the ‘60s or any other era, caricatured, perhaps, but with truth and insight to support it. Dustin Hoffman and Anne Bancroft are simply sensational.

WHO’S AFRAID OF VIRGINIA WOOLF? (1966) Richard Burton remains the standout in Nichols’ vibrant and vital adaptation of one of the seminal American plays, with Haskell Wexler’s mobile, unflattering black-and-white cinematography still a marvel.

WORKING GIRL (1988) This key female empowerment comedy is sheer enjoyment, plain and simple, with Nichols displaying his great skill with actors by making everyone in the variously talented cast look equally good.

And therein lies the first mystery. Why did this golden boy, who had conquered improv, recording, cabaret and Broadway by his early 30s, won an Oscar for his second film and batted .750 in his first four times up to the plate — with Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?The Graduate and Carnal Knowledge all going for extra bases while Catch-22 was a deep fly out to left — suddenly flatline, lose “The Knack” (also the title of a play he successfully directed in the early 1960s) and retreat to Broadway? Read the rest of this entry »


Vintage Iron Man

Iron-Man-Lighting


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