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Pulp Cover: ‘Girls Gone Wild on the D Train’

D-Train

this isnt happiness™

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Illuminated Choirbook: 1436 Consecration of Florence’s Santa Maria del Fiore

Illuminated-Choirbook

The New Criterion


Little Golden Book: ‘Frosty the Snow Man’

frosty-book

rogerwilkerson


Pulp Fiction Cover: ‘The Mystery Man of Soho’

Mystery-Man-Soho

Pulp Covers


Today in Comic Book History, December 11, 1942: Captain Marvel Adventures #18

Captain-Marvel

TODAY IN COMIC BOOK HISTORY: December 11, 1942

In the pages of Captain Marvel Adventures #18 we learn Billy Batson has a long lost twin sister, Mary Batson. Mary is based off of actress Judy Garland by artist Marc Swayze and soon gains the same powers as her brother and is later dubbed Mary Marvel.

Mary Marvel would go on to headline her own book with supporting characters such as Uncle Marvel. Although Wonder Woman debuted a year earlier, Mary Marvel gained a great following especially from younger girls.

In the mid-fifties Fawcett Publications ceased the Mary Marvel books and all the Captain Marvel Family titles due to a copyright lawsuit by DC, and she wouldn’t be seen again for 20 years. DC eventually started publishing stories about the Marvel Family in the early 70s under the title “Shazam”. Read the rest of this entry »


Pulp Fiction: ‘D is for Delinquent’

D-Delinquent

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She Was Strictly For The Boys!

The Jail Bait Age — what with petty thievery and wild marijuana parties, there had been enough problems for the faculty at Seacliff High before the girl named Gloria arrived. She was sixteen, she was sexy and she spelled trouble.

“This masterpiece is one of the most iconic images of teen delinquents and perhaps the finest single example of the JD genre. Published as the cover for three separate major publications, this painting has all the requisite elements of the classic 1950s troubled teen: the obligatory back drop of a basement club, the gorgeous sweater clad blonde, and the leering young tough, a wolf in hood’s clothing. Read the rest of this entry »


Pulp Fiction: ‘Bullets for the Bridegroom’

bullets-bridegroom

Bullets For The Bridegroom / The Lying Killer

Murder Interrupts A Wedding Night

Whit Whitney plays tag with blondes, blackjack and sudden death in Reno

They knew it was a tough town. But they hardly expected to be threatened with death by strangers because they forgot the marriage license…

pulpcovers


REWIND: Reason Magazine’s 1983 Interview with William F. Buckley Jr.

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I came across this delightful interview with William F. Buckley Jr. the other night when searching and browsing Firing Line video archives (see the 1990 Christopher Hitchens Firing Line episode, from earlier today, here) started reading it, and ended up reading it multiple times. What a pleasure to discover this. It’s captured from the pre-digital era, so it’s stored as a PDF of a photocopy directly from the print magazine, you can access the whole thing here. Below is just one image file, which links to Reason. The March 1983 interview reveals Buckley’s characteristic thoughtfulness, charm, rich vocabulary, humor, and well-mannered social persona, his Roman Catholicism, the founding of the National Review, decades of work on Firing Line, his friction with figures like Ayn Rand, his literary and scholarly alliances, and opponents, his spy novels, his views on libertarianism, contemporary conservatism, and much, much more. The Reason interviewer’s questions are good, too, informed, and engaging.

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I was particularly interested in Buckley’s use of the word “schematic”, to describe what he doesn’t have an appetite for, favoring instead an eclectic and evolving world view. This interview barely scratches the surface. To get a sense of the fresh appeal (and timelessness) of Buckley’s thinking, refer to National Review’s “Our Mission Statement“, which Buckley wrote in 1955. As one NR reader notes, “the edits on this for 2014 would be minimal.” Though 1980s references appear in the discussion, I’d say the same could be said about this interview.

buckley-reason-83

 


[BOOKS] Ayn Rand’s Early Novel ‘Ideal’ To Be Published After 80 Years

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Jennifer Maloney writes: Ayn Rand fans, here’s something to whet your appetites: New American Libraryhas released the cover image for “Ideal,” the first Ayn Rand novel to be published in more than 50 years.BN-FV694_ideal_HV_20141203122439

“I’ve heard wishful comments over many years from readers wondering if there were other novels in Ayn Rand’s papers.”

– Richard Ralston, publishing manager at the Ayn Rand Institute

Ayn Rand, author of “Atlas Shrugged” and “The Fountainhead,” invented the philosophy of Objectivism. More than 25 million copies of her novels have been sold around the world.

[Order Ayn Rand’s book Ideal from Amazon]

Ideal” tells the story of a screen actress who is accused of murder and visits six of her most devoted fans to ask for help. In 1934, when she was in her late 20s, Rand first wrote “Ideal” as a work of fiction.

But Rand was dissatisfied with it and set it aside. The same year, she rewrote it as a play. The play didn’t have its New York premiere until 2010 – 66 years after she wrote it. Read the rest of this entry »


Pulp Fiction: ‘Monte Carlo Mission’

Monte-Carlo

killercoversoftheweek


Vintage Fiction: ‘Science Wonder Stories’

science-wonder-stories

The Wonders of Space


Oral history of ‘The Right Stuff’


Complete Detective: ‘House of Too Many Lovers’ & ‘Harlot of the Highways’

Detective-pulp

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Vintage Crime Fiction: ‘NIGHTSHADE’

Ace Double D-21 Paperback Original (1953).  Cover by Norman Saunders


POTUS #42 on #43 About #41


[BOOKS] Midterm Noir: ‘They Lied To Her…’

TOUGH-DOLL


Get Your Kicks at New York’s ‘Poetry Brothel’

poety-brothel

A party where you pay to have verse read to you in a bordello-style setting is the saucy new alternative to New York’s dry literary scene.  Are poetry and sex work really comparable?

The Guardian‘s Sarah Theeboom writes: I am in the back room of the Backroom cocktail bar in New York, reclining on a fur-covered day bed. Next to me is a woman. She wears a leather corset and harem pants, like a gypsy girl from a fairytale. She is barefoot. In the dim candlelight, she asks what I’m in the mood for – something sexy? Something dark? I tell her what will please me, and she reads me a poem.

The Poetry Brothel’s ‘Madam’ presents a rotating cast of poets as ‘whores’, each operating within a carefully constructed character, who impart their work in public readings. Photograph: Don Emmery/Getty

The Poetry Brothel’s ‘Madam’ presents a rotating cast of poets as ‘whores’, each operating within a carefully constructed character, who impart their work in public readings. Photograph: Don Emmery/Getty

“Sex work and poetry are two of the oldest professions. Both are incredibly intimate acts that explore love, fantasy and the underside of people.”

– Madame Stephanie Berger

She calls herself a poetry whore, and I have paid for her company. For the next 10 minutes or so, she will read me her verses, converse with me, entertain me. Between sheer curtains I can see several other transactions unfolding around us, hear stanzas and lines being murmured in close quarters. Now and then, the madam passes unobtrusively through, keeping an eye on her rent boys and girls.

“It’s all about intimacy. You can have pretty good sex or you can enjoy a poem without it. But if it connects to you intimately, it’s so much better.”

– Poetry Brothel co-founder Nicholas Adamski

The madam is Stephanie Berger, who co-founded the Poetry Brothel with Nicholas Adamski in 2008. The two met while enrolled in the New School’s creative writing programme, bonding over a shared dissatisfaction with New York’s dry, highbrow poetry scene. They concocted the idea of a turn-of-the-century bordello – historically the realm of artists and miscreants – where writers could present their work in a more vibrant, visceral setting. They would dress up, invent alter egos, and sell not their bodies but their poems. Read the rest of this entry »


Rod Liddle: The Top 10 Most Fatuous Phrases in the English Language

vat070-museumceilingpainting-angelsanddemonds

Rod_Liddle-40x63Rod Liddle writes: Below are a bunch of the clichés, lies, evasions, obfuscations, PC euphemisms and disingenuous balls words and phrases which, in recent years, have annoyed me the most. There are countless others, but these are the ones which for one reason or other stick in my craw. And of course we begin with:

1. Battling my demons 

It was demons who held down that actress/pop singer/reality TV star and rammed four kilos of charlie up her left nostril leaving her with the IQ of an aspidistra and, alas, sans septum. It was demons who injected Philip Seymour Hoffman with skag. The same creatures regularly waylay the former footballer Paul Gascoigne and siphon several rosenbach-the-headache-george-cruikshank-detaillitres of vodka down his throat. And it was demons, a whole bunch of them, who grappled with Brooks Newmark’s penis and ensured it was transmitted digitally to the fictitious woman of his choice. This was my original Fatuous Phrase of the Week, an utterly ubiquitous cliché which serves only to absolve people from responsibility.

2. Vulnerable

It’s official — the most abused word in the English language these days. Today, as used by the whining liberal left, it means anyone who isn’t an able-bodied middle-aged white heterosexual male in full possession of his mental faculties. In other words, about 70 per cent of the population. It is frequently used as a euphemism for educationally retarded, or what we used to call ‘backward’; when you hear on the news that someone was ‘vulnerable’, you have to work out for yourself why. It’s not tyranny-clicheusually hard.

[You’re on the wrong side of history if you haven’t read Jonah Goldberg‘s book, “The Tyranny of Cliches, but you can order it from Amazon]

[The complete text of ‘s article is here, at The Spectator]

3. Diversity 

Something brilliant, to be championed. We all love diversity, don’t we? As used by the left it means ‘lots of ethnic angels-fighting-demons-paintings-wallpaper-pictures-of-angels-fighting-demons-wallpaper-hd-e1405873872626minorities’. Quite often it is deployed to mean precisely the opposite of its original meaning. As in ‘the area is very diverse’, referring to a place populated exclusively by Bangladeshis.

4. Denier

A horrible and recent confection of, again, the liberal left. You can be a ‘climate change denier’, which means you might doubt that global warming will cause quite the catastrophic circumstances — annihilation of all living creatures, earth burned to a crust, polar bears howling in agony — dreamed up by the maddest, gibbering eco-warriors. You can be a ‘sexual abuse denier’, which means you have one or two doubts about Operation Yewtree. The term was appropriated from the Holocaust, of course: the implication being that to deny that absolutely all 1970s celebrities were busy molesting kiddies is on a par with denying that Nazi Germany murdered six million Jewish people. Nice. Read the rest of this entry »


Pre-Ebola Pulp Fiction: ‘Prison Nurse: A Young Woman in an Underworld of Men’

prison-nurse


Pulp Fiction Cover: ‘Murder in the Blackout’

Murder in the Blackout


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