REWIND: Kevin D. Williamson on Harry Reid

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Good piece : In honor of ‘s retirement, ‘s cover piece from June

Via 


Howell Dodd: True Fact Crime, 1953

Trufactcrimetruefact2True Fact Crime, June 1953; cover art by Howell Dodd.

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Is Russian Literature Dead?

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Is Russian literature dead?


Pulp Cover: ‘Youth Against Obscenity’

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Pulp Covers


Edgar Rice Burroughs ‘Tarzan of the Apes’

TARZAN


Sci Fi Cover: ‘La Astronauve Fantasma’

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Pulp Cover: ‘Thrilling Mystery’

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Pulp Covers


Charles C. W. Cooke’s Apollo 11 Lunchbox

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Read the Charles C. W. Cooke profile here, at NYTimes.com


[VIDEO] The Conservatarian Manifesto: Should Libertarians and Conservatives Unite?

“I think the ‘conservatarian’ term is not a linguistic trick, it is a substantive attempt to describe a certain coterie on the right,” explains Charles C. W. Cooke, a writer for National Review and author of The Conservatarian Manifesto: Libertarians, Conservatives, and the Fight for the Right’s Future. “These are the people who say when they are around libertarians they feel conservative, and when they are around conservatarianconservatives they feel libertarian…(read more)

[Check out Charles C. W. Cooke‘s new book: “The Conservatarian Manifesto: Libertarians, Conservatives, and the Fight for the Right’s Futureat Amazon.com]

Reason TV‘s Nick Gillespie sat down with Cooke to discuss his book…(read more)

Reason.com


The Evolution of Literature

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Tough, Torrid Terrific! I, The Jury

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Pulp Fiction: ‘The Racket in Fatherless Babies!’

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Pulp Fiction: ‘Final Terror’

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Pulp Covers


[VIDEO] Charles C. W. Cooke: Becoming American, and a Variety of Accents

Author of “The Conservatarian Manifesto” Charles C.W. Cooke joins Will Cain for “The Cain Conversation,” to talk about what it means to become American. Also, Cooke does a variety of accents.

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[Order Charles C.W. Cooke‘s new book, “The Conservatarian Manifesto from Amazon.com]

“The Cain Conversation” with Charles C. W. Cooke


Vintage Pulp Fiction: ‘Cop Hater’

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Pulp Fiction: ‘Don’t Tempt the Hangman’

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Agency Ends Probe Into Publication of New Novel ‘Go Set a Watchman’ by ‘To Kill A Mockingbird’ Author Harper Lee

Harper Lee in the Monroeville courthouse. Photograph: Donald Uhrbrock/Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images

Surprise news of second book prompted speculation over whether she is capable of consent 

(MONTGOMERY, Ala.) —Kim Chandler reports: Alabama investigators looked into whether the recent deal to publish Harper Lee’s “To Kill A Mockingbird” sequel involved financial fraud, but they have closed the inquiry, a state official said Thursday.

Harper Lee with Gregory Peck, the star of the 1962 adaptation of To Kill a Mockingbird. Photograph: Bettmann/Corbis

Harper Lee with Gregory Peck, the star of the 1962 adaptation of To Kill a Mockingbird. Photograph: Bettmann/Corbis

“’To Kill a Mockingbird’ is among the most beloved novels in history, with worldwide sales topping 40 million copies. It was released on July 11, 1960, won the Pulitzer Prize and was adapted into a 1962 movie of the same name.”

Alabama Securities Commission Director Joseph Borg said his agency sent an investigator to speak with Lee at the request of the Alabama Department of Human Resources. Borg said the department, which handles complaints of elder abuse, asked his investigators toHarper Lee look into the situation because of their expertise in financial matters.

“We closed the file. Let’s just say that she was able to answer questions we asked to our satisfaction from our point of view.”

– Alabama Securities Commission Director Joseph Borg

The surprise news that the 88-year-old author would publish a second book prompted speculation over whether she is capable of giving consent to the publication.

“We don’t make competency determinations. We’re not doctors. But unless someone tells us to go back in, our file is closed on it.”

– Joseph Borg

A high-ranking state official said the Department of Human Resources began an investigation into Lee’s treatment following news that her second novel would be released. The official wasn’t authorized to release the information publicly and spoke only on condition of anonymity. It’s unclear whether that investigation entails anything beyond the interview the commission employees did with Lee, who lives in an assisted-living facility in her south Alabama hometown of Monroeville, the inspiration for “Mockingbird.”

Barry Spear, a spokesman for the department, declined comment. Read the rest of this entry »


[VIDEO] Weapons of Mass Instruction


In celebration of World Book Day (today!) 7UP commissioned Argentinian artist Raul Lemesoff to construct one of his famous book tanks.

Argentinian artist Raul Lemesoff Converts 1979 Ford Falcon into an Armored Tank Weaponized with 900 Free Books

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In this case he began with a stripped down 1979 Ford Falcon which he used to build a new roving library on wheels with an exterior framework capable of carrying 900 free books.

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Lemesoff refers to his militaristic bibliothecas as Weapons of Mass Instruction, and he drives them around the streets of Argentina giving free books to anyone who wants one, as long as they promise to read it.

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Watch the video above to see it all come together. (via Designboom)

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(more)

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Pulp Fiction: ‘Unfinished Business

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Seattle Mystery Bookshop


Pulp Fiction: ‘The Book of the Dead’

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October 1948 paperback reissue

cover art by Ed Grant

Seattle Mystery Bookshop


Absolute Beginners: ‘Inside the Teenage World of Coffee Bars, Motor Scooters, and Jazz Clubs’

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“And that’s what jazz music gives you: a big lift up of the spirits, and a Turkish bath with massage for all your nerves. I know even nice cats (like my Dad, for example) think that jazz is just noise and rock and sound angled at your genitals, not your intelligence, but I want you to believe that isn’t so at all, because it really makes you feel good in a very simple, but very basic, sort of way. I can best explain it by saying it just makes you feel happy. When I’ve been tired and miserable, which has been quite more than often, I’ve never known some good pure jazz music fail to help me on.”

— Colin MacInnes, Absolute Beginners


[BOOKS] Tocqueville’s Nightmare: The Administrative State Emerges in America, 1900-1940, by Daniel R. Ernst

Tocquevilles Warning to America: The Dangers of Despotism

Review of TOCQUEVILLE’S NIGHTMARE: The Administrative State Emerges in America, 1900-1940, by Daniel R. Ernst Oxford University Press, 2014

ADRIAN VERMEULE is the John H. Watson Professor of Law at Harvard Law School. He is the author or co-author of eight books on public law and legal theory, most recently The Constitution of Risk (2014).

Adrian Vermeile writes: Although Dan Ernst ends his account of the emergence of the American administrative state in 1940, the true climax, at least from the lawyer’s point of view, occurs in 1932. In that year the great Chief Justice Charles Evans Hughes undertook his titanic effort to forge a charter of compromise, a treaty of peace, between the administrative state and the rule of law. The case was Crowell v. Benson, involving an agency charged with deciding workman’s compensation cases involving injured maritime workers.

Franklin Roosevelt

“The mid-century attempt to domesticate the American administrative state, described so skillfully by Ernst, ultimately came undone, and it is a live question whether anything else has taken its place.”

Hughes’s opinion in many ways laid down lines of demarcation that were written into the Administrative Procedure Act of 1946, the great framework statute or quasi-constitution of the administrative state. It is a tribute to Hughes that his effort created an equilibrium that outlasted the turbulent years of his Chief Justiceship — despite the intervening constitutional revolution of 1937, after which the courts stopped trying to enforce narrow readings of the national government’s power tocquevilles_nightmare_bookover interstate commerce, and stopped trying to police statutory grants of authority from Congress to the executive (the so-called “nondelegation doctrine”).

[Order Daniel R. Ernst’s bookTocqueville’s Nightmare: The Administrative State Emerges in America, 1900-1940” from Amazon.com]

Having paid due tribute, however, it must be said that the equilibrium Hughes brought into being is a thing of the past. The line of demarcation between administration and law, the frontier of the administrative state, has shifted markedly, with law giving way to administration across almost every margin identified in Crowell — in large part because law has abnegated its authority to administration. Ernst is not wholly clear about whether the equilibrium he identifies persists all the way into the present, doubtless because the story from 1940 to the present is not the story he is trying to tell. But to understand the significance of his book, it is important to understand that what it offers is a portrait of a particular equilibrium, one that has since vanished. The mid-century attempt to domesticate the American administrative state, described so skillfully by Ernst, ultimately came undone, and it is a live question whether anything else has taken its place.

“Ernst’s narrative is highly readable and strikes just the right balance among the historian’s love of detail, the lawyer’s need for conceptual organization, and the political theorist’s addiction to high-level principles.”

Ernst’s narrative is highly readable and strikes just the right balance among the historian’s love of detail, the lawyer’s need for conceptual organization, and the political theorist’s addiction to high-level principles. Let me begin with the level of political and constitutional theory. The high-level frame of the book is a choice or contest among possible visions of the relationship between law and administration. Traditional lawyers were afflicted by “Tocqueville’s nightmare,” a vision of a centralized administration abusing its powers and trampling on legal rights. (The nightmare persists, of course, as Philip Hamburger’s recent book Traveling throughout the United States of the 1830s, Alexis de Tocqueville pondered the question of just how funny Americans were before deeming us decidedly unfunny.shows). The main alternatives or competitors may be understood as different conceptions of “the rule of law.”

[Read the full text of Adrian Vermeile‘s book review here, at New Rambler Review]

One alternative, championed by Ernst Freund, was the German idea of the Rechtsstaat — the rule-of-law state founded on clear positive enactments that would fix the metes and bounds “where the sovereign’s will prevailed and where it yielded to the will of the individual” (p. 2). The Rechtsstaat ideal, however, lost out to a different conception of the rule of law, championed by Hughes among others — a modified and updated version of Albert Venn Dicey’s ideal that subjected all official action to review by ordinary common-law courts.

Nomination Hearing Held For Thomas Wheeler To Chair The FCC

“…perhaps the major expansion of the administrative state since Crowellhas come not in the areas it addressed, but in an area it said almost nothing about: agency rulemaking. Agencies may act like little courts, as in Crowell, or like little legislatures, making general rules with the force and effect of law.”

After the emergence of the administrative state, the original version of the Diceyan ideal was a non-starter. Ernst shows convincingly that even some traditional lawyers came to understand and appreciate the expertise and efficiency of relatively nonpolitical agencies, who were more professional and less (Photo by Brendan Smialowski/Getty Images)liable to be overrun by patronage politics than other potential suppliers of lawmaking, such as legislative committees, and more knowledgeable and less expensive than the common-law judges and the elaborate processes of litigation. Such lawyers reinvented themselves as transactional engineers, shepherding clients through the administrative process — not “officers of the court” but “officers of the state” (6). Yet lawyers like Hughes also worked to translate or adapt Dicey’s commitments in the new environment, developing an approach that retained a crucial role for judicial review of administrative action. As Richard Fallon has observed in a different but related context, the translated Diceyan approach attempted not so much to get every given case right, but instead to provide an overall scheme of review that would suffice to keep the administrative state within the bounds of law. Read the rest of this entry »


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