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Pulp Fiction: ‘Monte Carlo Mission’

Monte-Carlo

killercoversoftheweek

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Vintage Fiction: ‘Science Wonder Stories’

science-wonder-stories

The Wonders of Space


Oral history of ‘The Right Stuff’


Complete Detective: ‘House of Too Many Lovers’ & ‘Harlot of the Highways’

Detective-pulp

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Vintage Crime Fiction: ‘NIGHTSHADE’

Ace Double D-21 Paperback Original (1953).  Cover by Norman Saunders


POTUS #42 on #43 About #41


[BOOKS] Midterm Noir: ‘They Lied To Her…’

TOUGH-DOLL


Get Your Kicks at New York’s ‘Poetry Brothel’

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A party where you pay to have verse read to you in a bordello-style setting is the saucy new alternative to New York’s dry literary scene.  Are poetry and sex work really comparable?

The Guardian‘s Sarah Theeboom writes: I am in the back room of the Backroom cocktail bar in New York, reclining on a fur-covered day bed. Next to me is a woman. She wears a leather corset and harem pants, like a gypsy girl from a fairytale. She is barefoot. In the dim candlelight, she asks what I’m in the mood for – something sexy? Something dark? I tell her what will please me, and she reads me a poem.

The Poetry Brothel’s ‘Madam’ presents a rotating cast of poets as ‘whores’, each operating within a carefully constructed character, who impart their work in public readings. Photograph: Don Emmery/Getty

The Poetry Brothel’s ‘Madam’ presents a rotating cast of poets as ‘whores’, each operating within a carefully constructed character, who impart their work in public readings. Photograph: Don Emmery/Getty

“Sex work and poetry are two of the oldest professions. Both are incredibly intimate acts that explore love, fantasy and the underside of people.”

– Madame Stephanie Berger

She calls herself a poetry whore, and I have paid for her company. For the next 10 minutes or so, she will read me her verses, converse with me, entertain me. Between sheer curtains I can see several other transactions unfolding around us, hear stanzas and lines being murmured in close quarters. Now and then, the madam passes unobtrusively through, keeping an eye on her rent boys and girls.

“It’s all about intimacy. You can have pretty good sex or you can enjoy a poem without it. But if it connects to you intimately, it’s so much better.”

– Poetry Brothel co-founder Nicholas Adamski

The madam is Stephanie Berger, who co-founded the Poetry Brothel with Nicholas Adamski in 2008. The two met while enrolled in the New School’s creative writing programme, bonding over a shared dissatisfaction with New York’s dry, highbrow poetry scene. They concocted the idea of a turn-of-the-century bordello – historically the realm of artists and miscreants – where writers could present their work in a more vibrant, visceral setting. They would dress up, invent alter egos, and sell not their bodies but their poems. Read the rest of this entry »


Rod Liddle: The Top 10 Most Fatuous Phrases in the English Language

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Rod_Liddle-40x63Rod Liddle writes: Below are a bunch of the clichés, lies, evasions, obfuscations, PC euphemisms and disingenuous balls words and phrases which, in recent years, have annoyed me the most. There are countless others, but these are the ones which for one reason or other stick in my craw. And of course we begin with:

1. Battling my demons 

It was demons who held down that actress/pop singer/reality TV star and rammed four kilos of charlie up her left nostril leaving her with the IQ of an aspidistra and, alas, sans septum. It was demons who injected Philip Seymour Hoffman with skag. The same creatures regularly waylay the former footballer Paul Gascoigne and siphon several rosenbach-the-headache-george-cruikshank-detaillitres of vodka down his throat. And it was demons, a whole bunch of them, who grappled with Brooks Newmark’s penis and ensured it was transmitted digitally to the fictitious woman of his choice. This was my original Fatuous Phrase of the Week, an utterly ubiquitous cliché which serves only to absolve people from responsibility.

2. Vulnerable

It’s official — the most abused word in the English language these days. Today, as used by the whining liberal left, it means anyone who isn’t an able-bodied middle-aged white heterosexual male in full possession of his mental faculties. In other words, about 70 per cent of the population. It is frequently used as a euphemism for educationally retarded, or what we used to call ‘backward’; when you hear on the news that someone was ‘vulnerable’, you have to work out for yourself why. It’s not tyranny-clicheusually hard.

[You’re on the wrong side of history if you haven’t read Jonah Goldberg‘s book, “The Tyranny of Cliches, but you can order it from Amazon]

[The complete text of ‘s article is here, at The Spectator]

3. Diversity 

Something brilliant, to be championed. We all love diversity, don’t we? As used by the left it means ‘lots of ethnic angels-fighting-demons-paintings-wallpaper-pictures-of-angels-fighting-demons-wallpaper-hd-e1405873872626minorities’. Quite often it is deployed to mean precisely the opposite of its original meaning. As in ‘the area is very diverse’, referring to a place populated exclusively by Bangladeshis.

4. Denier

A horrible and recent confection of, again, the liberal left. You can be a ‘climate change denier’, which means you might doubt that global warming will cause quite the catastrophic circumstances — annihilation of all living creatures, earth burned to a crust, polar bears howling in agony — dreamed up by the maddest, gibbering eco-warriors. You can be a ‘sexual abuse denier’, which means you have one or two doubts about Operation Yewtree. The term was appropriated from the Holocaust, of course: the implication being that to deny that absolutely all 1970s celebrities were busy molesting kiddies is on a par with denying that Nazi Germany murdered six million Jewish people. Nice. Read the rest of this entry »


Pre-Ebola Pulp Fiction: ‘Prison Nurse: A Young Woman in an Underworld of Men’

prison-nurse


Pulp Fiction Cover: ‘Murder in the Blackout’

Murder in the Blackout


‘He Lived For Love And Was Well Paid For It’

call-boy


An American Wife on the Loose in France: ‘Secrets of Paris Nights’

Paris-secret-nights


[PHOTO] Books, Babes, Bullfights, Bravado; 20th Century Man, Ernest Hemingway

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From LIFE magazine

[Explore the vast Hemingway collection at Amazon]


Mae Risked It All to Fight For Your Right to Read: ‘I Was an Intellectual Freedom Fighter’

Intellectual-freedom-fighters


Pulp Fiction: ‘Chasse Aux Documents’

Bookcover art by Salva for Jerry Crayton, Chasse aux documents, Ed. Le Trotteur

Seattle Mystery Bookshop  – carrefouretrange


Swag Be Like, Old School: Slang for the Ages

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Kory Stamper writes: Everyone knows that slang is informal speech, usually invented by reckless young people, who are ruining proper English. These obnoxious upstart words are vapid and worthless, say the guardians of good usage, and lexicographers like me should be preserving language that has a lineage, well-bred words with wholesome backgrounds, rather than recording the modish vulgarities of street shakesargot.

[Check out McGraw-Hill’s Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions at Amazon.com]

In fact, much of today’s slang has older and more venerable roots than most people realize.

Take “swag.” As a noun (“Check out my swag, yo / I walk like a ballplayer” — Jay Z), a verb (“I smash this verse / and I swag and surf” — Lil Wayne), an adjective (“I got ya slippin’ on my swag juice” — Eminem), and even as an interjection (“Say hello to falsetto in three, two, swag” — Justin Bieber), swag refers to a sense of confidence and style. It’s slangy enough that few dictionaries have entered it yet. Read the rest of this entry »


Panetta Book: ‘Obnoxious and Lacks Stature’

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“‘Worthy Fights’ is highly self-regarding even for a Washington book.”

Peggy Noonan writes: There’s the sense of an absence where the president should be.

Decisions are made—by someone, or some agency—on matters of great consequence, Ebola, for instance. The virus has swept three nations of West Africa; a Liberian visitor has just died in Dallas. The Centers for Disease Control says it is tracking more than 50 people with whom he had contact.

“Publicly Mr. Panetta has always been at great pains to show the smiling, affable face of one who is above partisanship. But this book is smugly, grubbily partisan.”

The commonsense thing—not brain science, just common sense—would be for the government to say: “As of today we will stop citizens of the affected nations from entering the U.S. We will ban appropriate flights, and as time passes we’ll see where we are. We can readjust as circumstances change. But for now, easy does it—slow things down.”51O63wb9qqL._SL250_

[Check out Panetta’s “Worthy Fights: A Memoir of Leadership in War and Peace” at Amazon.com]

Instead the government chooses to let the flow of individuals from infected countries continue. They will be screened at five U.S. airports, where their temperatures will be taken and they will be asked if they have been around anyone with Ebola.

A lot of them, knowingly or unknowingly, have been around Ebola. People who are sick do not in the early stages have elevated temperatures. People who are desperate to leave a plague state will, understandably if wrongly, lie on questionnaires.

“He is telling partisan Democrats on the ground that he’s really one of them, he hates those Republicans too, so you can trust him when he tells you Mr. Obama’s presidency is not a success.”

U.S. health-care workers at airports will not early on be organized, and will not always show good judgment. TSA workers sometimes let through guns and knives. These workers will be looking for microbes, which, as they say, are harder to see. A baby teething can run a fever; so will a baby with the virus. A nurse or doctor with long experience can tell the difference. Will the airport workers?

None of this plan makes sense. Read the rest of this entry »


[PHOTO] Woody Allen, Bibliophile

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Hemingway Grandsons Celebrate 60th Anniversary of Author’s Nobel Prize

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Hemingway, who lived from 1899 until his suicide in 1961, was a journalist, author, world traveler and sportsman. In the 1940s and 1950s, he spent half the year in Cuba and would summer in Idaho

“This is a really emotional day, being here with the people of Cojimar. It’s something personal, it’s a family thing, and I also think it is historic.” 

– John Hemingway

COJIMAR – Carlos Batista writes: Just like Ernest Hemingway used to do, two of his grandsons sailed into the fishing town of Cojimar on Monday, marking 60 years since the iconic US author won the Nobel prize.

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John and Patrick Hemingway sailed in from the Ernest Hemingway International Yacht Club west of Havana, through the Gulf waters where “Papa” used to fish, with a group of 16 that arrived Sunday.

[Explore books and other cool stuff about Ernest Hemingway at Amazon.com] 

“This is a really emotional day, being here with the people of Cojimar. It’s something personal, it’s a family thing, and I also think it is historic,” John Hemingway, 54, said in Spanish to about 200 people who gathered on the fishing town’s waterfront to greet them.

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The author, also known for works such as “The Sun Also Rises,” “For Whom the Bell Tolls,” and “A Farewell to Arms,” received the Nobel prize for literature in 1954.

About a dozen boats joined the four yachts carrying the Hemingway party in the two-hour sail over to Cojimar.

Hemingway, who lived in Cuba for over 20 years, rented a home in the town. He fished enthusiastically and was inspired here to write the classic “The Old Man and the Sea.0

Hemingway’s boat is in dry dock these days, near his Cojimar home, now a museum run by the government of Raul Castro, 83

The four yachts flew both US and Cuban flags; the two countries have not had full diplomatic ties since 1961.

Events like this “could contribute to some positive things between the United States and Cuba,” said John, a writer who lives in Montreal, alongside brother Patrick, 48, a photographer who lives in Vancouver.

Hemingway’s close ties to Cuba

Hemingway, who lived from 1899 until his suicide in 1961, was a journalist, author, world traveler and sportsman. In the 1940s and 1950s, he spent half the year in Cuba and would summer in Idaho.

“I met Hemingway myself when I was very young, maybe 13 or 14, and then we became friends.”

– Osvaldo Carrero Pina, now 78.

The dramatic twists were not just in his books; he struggled with mental illness and health consequences of heavy drinking even as he became an acclaimed author with a singular and strong spare style.

Married four times, Ernest Hemingway had three sons: Jack, Patrick and Gregory, the latter being John and Patrick’s father.

Ernest Hemingway was fascinated by game hunting and deep sea fishing, capped with drinks and some writing.

Ernest Hemingway and Carlos Gutierrez aboard Hemingway's boat, the Pilar, 1934. Photograph in the Ernest Hemingway Photograph Collection, John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, Boston.

Ernest Hemingway and Carlos Gutierrez aboard Hemingway’s boat, the Pilar, 1934. Photograph in the Ernest Hemingway Photograph Collection, John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, Boston.

The author, also known for works such as “The Sun Also Rises,” “For Whom the Bell Tolls,” and “A Farewell to Arms,” received the Nobel prize for literature in 1954.

And it was here in Cojimar that Hemingway docked his boat “El Pilar,” obsessed about marlin, knocked back mojitos, and where Cuban fishermen inspired his “Old Man.

When the Americas’ only communist government took power, around 1960, Hemingway left Cuba for the last time—but not before meeting longtime president Fidel Castro. Read the rest of this entry »


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