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FAA Extends WTF Travel Ban to Israel for Another 24 Hours

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ABC News reports: The FAA announced today that they have not lifted their ban against travel to or from Tel Aviv‘s airport and will prohibit travel to the country for an additional 24 hours.

[See [VIDEO] Lowry: FAA Ban ‘an Overreaction and a Real Blow to Israel’]

“The agency is working closely with the Government of Israel to review the significant new information they have provided and determine whether potential risks to U.S. civil aviation are mitigated so the agency can resolve concerns as quickly as possible,” the FAA said in a statement.

This comes a day after they barred all American air carriers from flying to or from Ben Gurion International Airport in Tel Aviv following a rocket attack within a mile of the airport. Read the rest of this entry »

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[VIDEO] Bill Whittle: It’s Been 45 Years Since Man Walked on the Moon for the First Time. Have We Been Challenged Since?

Its been 45 years since man walked on the moon for the first time. Have we been challenged since? Or are we a windless sail, full of potentital without a direct challenge? We tamed a continent, we conquered the skies, and we did fly to the moon–don’t let us, as a people, only have political discussion as our challenge.

Afterburner w/Bill Whittle


USA 45 Years Ago: NYT Cover ‘Men Walk On Moon’


[IMAGE] APOLLO 11: 45th Anniversary

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Passionately Curious – 45!


Global Air Traffic Avoiding Ukraine


BUSTED: Pro-Russian Rebel Leader Boasted About Downing a Plane Before He Realized…


[VIDEO] ISS Apollo 11 45th Anniversary Message

“When Apollo 11 landed on the moon 45 years ago, this space station that we live on was science fiction”

International Space Station astronauts Steve Swanson and Reid Wiseman salute the Apollo 11 mission on the 45th anniversary of its launch.

“But today it is reality thanks to the legacy of the Apollo astronauts…”

“When Apollo 11 landed on the moon 45 years ago,” says Swanson, “this space station that we live on was science fiction. But today it is reality thanks to the legacy of the Apollo astronauts and all the nations that have followed the path to space since then.”

 


Joe Pappalardo: Everything You Need to Know About the Air Forces New Bomber

Defense contractors are now bidding on the right to build the Long Range Strike Bomber. This is what you need to know about the Air Force’s next big machine of death.

For Popular Mechanics, Joe Pappalardo writes: The U.S. Air Force this week made it official: They are officially in the market for a next-gen-stealth-0714-mdnnew bomber. In wonk speak, the service sent a formal Request for Proposals to defense contractors who will vie for the (at least) $55 billion program.

“Will the LRS-B be designed to deliver nukes? The Air Force has indicated that the priority for America’s new bomber is not an ability to drop nuclear bombs but to deliver other weapons”

Like any massive, classified national security effort, few things about the Long Range Strike Bomber (LRS-B) are exactly what they appear to be. So here’s a cheat sheet.

1. Our Bomber Fleet is Old—Very Old

The average B-52 Stratofortress is 50 years old, and the B-1 Lancer fleet has a mean age of 28. Now, there are plenty of things you can do with a B-52; you can fly over undefended terrain and drop bombs, or launch missiles from longer, safer ranges. But you can’t fly a B-52 anywhere that is guarded by the kind of top-notch, integrated air defense radar and anti-aircraft missiles that Russia sells and that China, Iran, Syria, and others use. Only the B-2 stealth bomber can breach those defenses.  Read the rest of this entry »


[PHOTO] Gordon Cooper in Mercury Spacesuit

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Official portrait of Gordon Cooper while wearing the Mercury spacesuit

Exploring Space


Space: The Apollo 11 Mission to the Moon Took Place 45 Years Ago This Week


[PHOTO] Space: Robert C. Stewart Flying a Rarely Used MMU in 1984

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Exploring Space


United Flight Over Pacific Ocean Makes Emergency Landing, Burning Smell Reported

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CNN WIRE SERVICE reports: A youngster described on social media how “something was on fire” on a harrowing United Airlines flight Friday over the Pacific Ocean that the FAA said was forced to land on Midway Island because of an electrical odor on board.

The United Airlines plane, carrying 335 passengers and 13 crew on a Boeing 777, was flying from Honolulu to Guam when it was forced to land and spend seven hours on the Pacific atoll, said United spokeswoman Mary Clark. A replacement aircraft later carried everyone back to Hawaii on Friday, she said.

When explicitly asked Saturday whether the disturbing smell was smoke or something burning, Clark described the incident as an odor in the cabin.

But one passenger, a minor, tweeted about parts of the incident, including how the “flight attendant said there’s a burning smell in the cockpit…. (expletive) what?”

At one point, the plane dipped dramatically, he said. Read the rest of this entry »


#Orb2 Launch to the #ISS Starts at Noon ET Sunday on NASA TV


The Surprisingly Strong Case for Colonizing Venus

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Science fiction writers have come up with a plausible scenario for a floating city above the fiery planet.

For CityLabJames McGirk writes: Why worry about building a colony on Mars when instead you could float one high above the surface of Venus? Science fiction writer Charles Stross recently revived the idea of building a Venutian colony when he suggested, cheekily, that billionaires ought to be compelled to donate to massive humanity-improving projects. He suggested two: a Manhattan Project-like focus on developing commercial nuclear fusion, or the construction of a floating city on Venus.

The second planet from the Sun might seem like a nasty place to build a home, with a surface temperature hot enough to melt lead and an atmosphere so dense it would feel like being submerged beneath 3000 feet of water. But the air on Venus thins out as you rise above the surface and cools considerably; about 30 miles up you hit the sweet spot for human habitation: Mediterranean temperatures and sea-level barometric pressure. If ever there were a place to build a floating city, this would be it.

Believe it or not, a floating city might be a feasible project. Scientist and science fiction author Geoffrey Landis presented a paper called “Colonizing Venus” [PDF] at the Conference on Human Space Exploration, Space Technology & Applications International Forum in Albuquerque, New Mexico back in 2003. Breathable air floats in Venus’s soupy carbon dioxide atmosphere, which means on Venus, a blimp could use air as its lifting gas, the way terrestrial blimps use helium to float in our much thinner atmosphere.

This figure shows the volcanic peak Idunn Mons in the Imdr Regio area of Venus. The topography derives from data obtained by NASA's Magellan spacecraft, with a vertical exageration of 30 times. Radar data (in brown) from Magellan has been draped on top of the topographic data. Bright areas are rough or have steep slopes. Dark areas are smooth. (NASA/JPL/ESA)

This figure shows the volcanic peak Idunn Mons in the Imdr Regio area of Venus. The topography derives from data obtained by NASA’s Magellan spacecraft, with a vertical exageration of 30 times. Radar data (in brown) from Magellan has been draped on top of the topographic data. Bright areas are rough or have steep slopes. Dark areas are smooth. (NASA/JPL/ESA)

A group of science fiction authors and scientists have been discussing the idea on the blog Selenian Boondocks, which founder Jonathan Goff describes as “a blog I founded to discuss space politics, policy, technology, business, and space settlement.” One of the biggest problems with a lunar or Martian colony is that an astronaut’s bones and muscles deteriorate in low gravity. No one knows yet how much gravity a human needs to prevent deterioration, but Venus’s gravity is the closest to Earth’s, at about 9/10ths. Mars only has a third of the gravity that the Earth does, while the moon has a mere sixth. Read the rest of this entry »


[VIDEO] Fireworks Filmed With a Drone

Fantastico! Flying through a firework show with a DJI Phantom 2 and filming it with a GoPro Hero 3 silver. The quad was not damaged. Here’s one in HD.


[PHOTO] Floating Water Droplets

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A photo through two floating water droplets

Exploring Space


[VIDEO] Yo-Yo Tricks In Space!

Fun with Physics! NASA astronaut Don Pettit enjoyed some of his off-duty time showcasing yo-yo behavior in microgravity aboard the International Space Station.

 


A Decade of Amazing Saturn Images

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Images via NASA. 

For Popular MechanicsNiko Vercelletto writes: Since it reached the orbit of Saturn 10 years ago today, the Cassini spacecraft has captured mind-blowing images and collected invaluable data about the ringed planet and its multitude of moons.

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Launched from Earth in 1997, the probe was originally approved for a four-year mission, but that mission has now been extended three times. Good thing, too. With so much time spent in orbit of the sixth planet, Cassini has studied not only the gorgeous gas giant but also moons such as Titan, with its great hydrocarbon lakes, and Enceladus, with its jets of ice.  Read the rest of this entry »


Honda Jet with Engine Mounted Over the Wing Takes its First Flight.


First Test Flight of NASA’s Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator a Success


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