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The White Ghetto

One of my favorite NRO writers, Kevin D. Williamson, has a thoughtful, lengthy item this week:

white-ghetto

In Appalachia the country is beautiful and the society is broken

Owsley County, Ky. – Kevin D. Williamson  writes:  There are lots of diversions in the Big White Ghetto, the vast moribund matrix of Wonder Bread–hued Appalachian towns and villages stretching from northern Mississippi to southern New York, a slowly dissipating nebula of poverty and misery with its heart in eastern Kentucky, the last redoubt of the Scots-Irish working class that picked up where African slave labor left off, mining and cropping and sawing the raw materials for a modern American economy that would soon run out of profitable uses for the class of people who 500 years ago would have been known, without any derogation, as peasants. Thinking about the future here and its bleak prospects is not much fun at all, so instead of too much black-minded introspection you have the pills and the dope, the morning beers, the endless scratch-off lotto cards, healing meetings up on the hill, the federally funded ritual of trading cases of food-stamp Pepsi for packs of Kentucky’s Best cigarettes and good old hard currency, tall piles of gas-station nachos, the occasional blast of meth, Narcotics Anonymous meetings, petty crime, the draw, the recreational making and surgical unmaking of teenaged mothers, and death: Life expectancies are short — the typical man here dies well over a decade earlier than does a man in Fairfax County, Va. — and they are getting shorter, women’s life expectancy having declined by nearly 1.1 percent from 1987 to 2007.

If the people here weren’t 98.5 percent white, we’d call it a reservation.

Driving through these hills and hollows, you aren’t in the Appalachia of Elmore Leonard’s Justified or squatting with Lyndon Johnson on Tom Fletcher’s front porch in Martin County, a scene famously photographed by Walter Bennett of Time, the image that launched the so-called War on Poverty. The music isn’t “Shady Grove,” it’s Kanye West. There is still coal mining — which, at $25 an hour or more, provides one of the more desirable occupations outside of government work — but the jobs are moving west, and Harlan County, like many coal-country communities, has lost nearly half of its population over the past 30 years.

There is here a strain of fervid and sometimes apocalyptic Christianity, and visions of the Rapture must have a certain appeal for people who already have been left behind. Like its black urban counterparts, the Big White Ghetto suffers from a whole trainload of social problems, but the most significant among them may be adverse selection: Those who have the required work skills, the academic ability, or the simple desperate native enterprising grit to do so get the hell out as fast as they can, and they have been doing that for decades. As they go, businesses disappear, institutions fall into decline, social networks erode, and there is little or nothing left over for those who remain. It’s a classic economic death spiral: The quality of the available jobs is not enough to keep good workers, and the quality of the available workers is not enough to attract good jobs. These little towns located at remote wide spots in helical mountain roads are hard enough to get to if you have a good reason to be here. If you don’t have a good reason, you aren’t going to think of one.

Appalachian places have evocative and unsentimental names denoting deep roots: Little Barren River, Coal Pit Road. The name “Cumberland” blankets Appalachian geography — the Cumberland Mountains, the Cumberland River, several Cumberland counties — in tribute to the Duke of Cumberland, who along with the Ulster Scots ancestors of the Appalachian settlers crushed the Young Pretender at the Battle of Culloden. Even church names suggest ancient grievances: Separate Baptist, with the descriptor in all-capital letters. (“Come out from among them and be ye separate” — 2 Corinthians 6:17.) I pass a church called “Welfare Baptist,” which, unfortunately, describes much of the population for miles and miles around…

read the rest…

National Review Online

— Kevin D. Williamson is a roving correspondent for National Review. This article originally appeared in the December 16, 2013, issue of National Review.

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6 Comments on “The White Ghetto”

  1. Richard M Nixon (Deceased) says:

    Reblogged this on Dead Citizen's Rights Society.

  2. […] Pundit from another Planet One of my favorite NRO writers, Kevin D. Williamson, has a thoughtful, lengthy item this week: In […]

  3. You’ve seen the dark side of the Appalachians. I hope you have also seen the light and beautiful side.I invite you to take a look at my blog once in a while to see the funny side as well. As a native Southeastern Kentucky daughter, my life is living proof that everything from the hills is not negative, not ignorant, not hopeless. I grew up there. My home was beautiful, clean, safe, wholesome, happy and blessed. There was none of the bleakness you mentioned around me. It was an idyllic life. I look back on it with tremendous fondness. In fact, I long to go home every day. I know, however, that not everyone in the area was so fortunate. I am aware of the meth labs and the prostitutes exchanging their favors for pills. I am aware of the grocery carts full of soda pop bought with foodstamps and traded for drug money. This is the dark side of my area. This is a “subculture”, if you will. This is not us as a whole. We as a whole are decent, God fearing, clean living, hard working people with old fashioned values often misunderstood by others and wrongfully perceived as backward. There are more educated and gifted individuals among us than the rest of the country realizes.


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