So Much For The ‘Year of Action’

Obama is full of talk about cutting red tape on job- and energy-creating projects, but it’s just talk.

Obama is full of talk about cutting red tape on job- and energy-creating projects, but it’s just talk.

FREE THE PIPELINE

Jonah Goldberg writes:  Welcome to the “year of action.” In last week’s State of the Union address, the president vowed to do whatever he must to help the economy, even if that means working around Congress: “What I offer tonight is a set of concrete, practical proposals to speed up growth, strengthen the middle class, and build new ladders of opportunity into the middle class. Some require congressional action, and I’m eager to work with all of you. But America does not stand still, and neither will I. So wherever and whenever I can take steps without legislation to expand opportunity for more American families, that’s what I’m going to do.”

The White House has touted the fact the president has a “phone and a pen” and he’s not afraid to use them.

[The Tyranny of Clichés is now on sale in paperback.]

The president also vowed to cut red tape, and not for the first time. In 2013’s State of the Union, he insisted that “my administration will keep cutting red tape and speeding up new oil and gas permits.” And in 2012: “In the next few weeks, I will sign an executive order clearing away the red tape that slows down too many construction projects.”

All of this was in the wake of Obama’s 2011 executive order requiring the elimination of “redundant, inconsistent, or overlapping” regulations. The administration had hailed the order as an “unprecedented” move to boost growth. In an op-ed for the Wall Street Journal touting the order, the president wrote: “We’re also getting rid of absurd and unnecessary paperwork requirements that waste time and money.”

Laymen might have the impression that the president wants to cut red tape and take action on job-creating infrastructure, particularly oil and gas projects.

The fools.

On Friday, the State Department issued a much-awaited study on the Keystone XL pipeline. It found that there would be a negligible effect on climate change — the president’s only expressed reservation about the project, which would create thousands of construction jobs and generate billions in tax revenue.

In fact, the study concluded that if the pipeline from Canada is not built, it could result in a significant increase in greenhouse-gas emissions. That’s because the alternative means (trucks, rail, etc.) of transporting the fuel — which Canada says will be pumped no matter what — are more carbon intensive than a pipeline.

So we’re a go, right? Au contraire, White House chief of staff Denis McDonough explained Sunday on NBC’s Meet the Press. The State Department study is but “one of many important inputs into the process.” Other departments get to weigh in. Which ones? Well, almost all of them, it seems: Defense, Justice, Interior, Commerce, Transportation, Energy, and Homeland Security, plus the Environmental Protection Agency. Those poor saps at Housing and Urban Development must feel like chopped liver.

But it gets funnier….

Read the rest…

National Review Online

— Jonah Goldberg is the author of The Tyranny of Clichés, now on sale in paperback. You can write to him by e-mail at goldbergcolumn@gmail.com, or via Twitter @JonahNRO. © 2014 Tribune Media Services, Inc.


One Comment on “So Much For The ‘Year of Action’”

  1. Reblogged this on Ace News Services 2014 and commented:
    #AceNewsServices says ` It is not what the President should or does say that matter’s but what he really means. In this case he needs to keep the environment lobbyists happy on one hand, and also his cronies on the other. Typical government rhetoric. #evadingthetruth


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