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The VA Scandal is Another Government Example of the Failure to Follow a Collective Mission

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Secretary of Veterans Affairs Eric Shinseki waves goodbye after addressing the National Coalition for Homeless Veterans on May 30 in Washington, D.C. (Photo: Win McNamee, Getty Images)

For USA TodayGlenn Harlan Reynolds writes: Government, we are sometimes told, is just another word for things we choose to do together. Like a lot of things politicians say, this sounds good. And, also like a lot of things politicians say, it isn’t the least bit true.

“…Whether the sign out front says “Department of Veterans Affairs” or “Ministry of Silly Walks,” their behavior will tend to favor those personally agreeable outcomes…”

Many of the things government does, we don’t choose. Many of the things we choose, government doesn’t new-schooldo. And whatever gets done, we’re not the ones doing it. And those who are doing it often interpret their mandates selfishly.

[Glenn Harlan Reynolds is the author of The New School: How the Information Age Will Save American Education from Itself, check it out at Amazon.com]

Take, for example, the Veterans Administration. The American people — most of us, anyway — did “choose” to provide first-class medical care for our veterans. But we didn’t do it. We set up the Veterans Administration to do it. And the Veterans Administration — or, more accurately, some of the people who work for and run the Veterans Administration — had a stronger interest in other things. Things like fat bonuses, and low workloads in comfy offices. Thus we find that, even though veterans were dying, and books were being cooked, every single VA senior executive received an evaluation of “fully successful” or better over a 4-year period. That’s right. Every single one. Over four years. At least 65% of them received bonuses (“performance awards“). All while veterans around the country were suffering and dying because of delayed care. The executives got these bonuses, in part, because they cooked the books, because the bonuses were more important to them than the veterans’ care.

It would be nice to believe that this sort of problem is limited to the VA, but there’s no particular reason to think that it is. The problem with the VA is that, like every other government agency — and every other human institution — it’s not a machine that runs itself. It’s a collection of people. And people tend to act in their own self interest.

Left to their own devices, people will tend to make choices that produce a more comfortable life for them, and that produce a higher paycheck. Whether the sign out front says “Department of Veterans Affairs” or “Ministry of Silly Walks,” their behavior will tend to favor those personally agreeable outcomes more than the mission of the institution….(read more)

USA Today

Glenn Harlan Reynolds, a University of Tennessee law professor, is the author of The New School: How the Information Age Will Save American Education from Itself

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