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NPR Struggles to Defend Obama in Supreme Court Defeat: ‘In Narrow Ruling’… ‘Least Significant Loss Possible…’

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On the radio this afternoon, in my car, I heard this opener on NPR:

“In a technically-unianimous” ruling…”

Which I think accurately reflects the tone for how the Left Wing Media will be covering today’s news. To be fair…NPR is technically a news organization.

To insert the word “technically” in the lead sentence in their main news broadcast coverage of the Supreme court decision is bias bullshit political cover predictable spin from an organization whose executives, managers, and employees have been exposed as donors to Obama’s campaign. Note: A Supreme court decision is either unanimous, or it isn’t.

In NPR’s web version of the news report the word “unanimous”, thankfully, stands all by itself, with no fabric softener, no qualifier, no soothing delegitimizer.

In a unanimous ruling, the justices said the Constitution’s recess-appointments clause gave Congress the power to decide when it is in recess, and that there was no recess when Obama acted. The case is National Labor Relations Board v. Noel Canning…

…but it only takes a few paragraphs for NPR to assert its view of the (in)significance of the ruling. Quoting an obscure fragment dug up from an AP report to help fortify the validity of NPR’s sullen attitude:

As The Associated Press notes, “[T]he outcome was the least significant loss possible for the administration. The justices, by a 5-4 vote, rejected a sweeping lower court ruling against the administration that would have made it virtually impossible for any future president to make recess appointments.”…(read more) NPR

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One Comment on “NPR Struggles to Defend Obama in Supreme Court Defeat: ‘In Narrow Ruling’… ‘Least Significant Loss Possible…’”

  1. Paul Lemmen says:

    Reblogged this on Dead Citizen's Rights Society.


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