[VIDEO] Marco Rubio: Immigration Reform Will ‘Never’ Pass in One Comprehensive Bill

More from the talking-head shows, from The Corner.  Rubio was on the defensive for most of the interview (who wouldn’t be, under the hot lights with interviewer Chris Wallace?) and for good reason: Rubio was a leading proponent of  comprehensive immigration reform, until he flamed out in the polls, and is now trying to reinvent his message. Here’s some of Andrew Johnson‘s summary of Rubio’s Fox News Sunday interview:

“We’re not debating what to do — we’re debating how to do it. I’m just telling you we will never have the votes necessary to pass in one bill all of those things — it just won’t happen.”

Though the political class hasn’t caught up with this yetAmericans are rightly skeptical of any public policy package with the word “comprehensive” on it. It’s kryptonite. Don’t open that package. Send it back.

[Chris Wallace grills Rubio on immigration: “If it’s not political, why did you flip?” – Mediaite]

Some of Rubio’s more interesting comments, not included here (I just watched the broadcast of Rubio’s Fox News Sunday interview a moment ago) was not about immigration, but in defense of characterizing Hillary Clinton as a “20th Century candidate“. Chris Wallace noted that some see it as a veiled reference to Hillary’s advanced age. Rubio responded that you can be 40 years old, and be a candidate of the 20th Century. Rubio launched into a fairly typical monologue outlining an entrepreneurial alternative to Hillary’s statism. Some of it was good, not defensive, occasionally colorful and distracting. Here’s a money quote:

“We are going through the equivalent of an industrial revolution every five years.”

True? Not true? Either way, it’s a campaigner’s flourish. Not unlike something an ascendant Newt Gingrich or Bill Clinton would say when they wanted to change the subject with futuristic-sounding language. 

 [Sen. Marco Rubio tests presidential hype in New Hampshire]

Rubio, who was a member of the “Gang of Eight” who worked on the Senate’s comprehensive immigration reform bill, would not directly say if he was advocating for the new approach to reform, but offered up the reality of such a bill’s chances…(read more)

National Review Online



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