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Hong Kong Readies for Protester Vote

HK-tent-protest

City Calm Ahead of a Vote Organized by Pro-Democracy Protest Leaders

Chester Yung, Fiona Law and Prudence Ho reporting: Hong Kong was calm Sunday ahead of a two-day vote organized by protest leaders—an attempt to seek popular legitimacy for a pro-democracy movement that for almost a month has clogged the city’s main arteries.
[Follow Pundit Planet’s EXCLUSIVE coverage of the Hong Kong protests]

Crowds grew Saturday at the downtown protest site, as they have during other weekends, though there were no reports of clashes between demonstrators and police as on other recent evenings.

The student-led protesters want anyone to be able to stand for Hong Kong’s first ever public ballot for chief executive in 2017. China’s government in August ruled a selection committee largely loyal to Beijing will select those who can stand, sparking the protests.

People listened to talks between student leaders and senior government officials as they were broadcast live at a protest site in the Mong Kok district of Hong Kong, Oct. 21, 2014. PHILIPPE LOPEZ/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES

People listened to talks between student leaders and senior government officials as they were broadcast live at a protest site in the Mong Kok district of Hong Kong, PHILIPPE LOPEZ/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES

Some local citizens—who have taken to wearing blue ribbons—are angry that students have shut down parts of the city over the issue. On Saturday night there were reports that some blue ribbon demonstrators had attacked journalists covering their counter protests in Kowloon.

“I agree with the students’ goal. Who doesn’t want a democratic society?” 

— Tung Chee-hwa

Radio Television Hong Kong and Television Broadcasts Ltd. issued statements complaining their journalists had been pushed and kicked by blue ribbon protesters. Police haven’t made any arrests.

Hong Kong Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying reiterated Saturday he won’t resign, saying the protesters’ demands aren’t in accordance with the Basic Law, the city’s mini-constitution.

Financial Secretary John Tsang weighed in on his blog Sunday, warning the protesters’ tactics of civil disobedience could cause long-term political damage.

“My concerns about the economy do not match my worries about the movement’s harm to Hong Kong’s administration and rule of law,” Mr. Tsang wrote.

Student leaders want to show their aims have broad support in this city of seven million. Protests have numbered in the thousands recently, and the thoughts of many citizens are unclear….(read more)

WSJ

—Isabella Steger, Kate O’Keeffe and Ned Levin contributed to this article.

Write to Chester Yung at chester.yung@wsj.com, Fiona Law at fiona.law@wsj.com and Prudence Ho at prudence.ho@wsj.com

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2 Comments on “Hong Kong Readies for Protester Vote”

  1. […] The Butcher City Calm Ahead of a Vote Organized by Pro-Democracy Protest Leaders Chester Yung, Fiona Law and […]

  2. […] Hong Kong Readies for Protester Vote (punditfromanotherplanet.com) […]


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