Jonah Goldberg on the Sony Fiasco: ‘No Superheroes in The Interview Cave-In’

cap-america-nro

The first issue of Captain America came out on December 20, 1940. It shows Cap slugging Adolph Hitler in the mouth.tyranny-cliche

[Jonah Goldberg‘s book, “The Tyranny of Cliches, is a few keystrokes away, at Amazon]

Good stuff, but note the date. America wouldn’t enter World War II for about another year. At the time, many Americans wanted to stay out of another European war. And here was an American superhero punching the leader of a sovereign nation in the kisser. Subsequent issues kept pitting Captain America against Hitler and his goons.

“A theater chain caved. The movie studio caved. As of now, The Interview will never be theatrically released. In theory, Sony could release it online, via on-demand and streaming channels.”

The angriest reaction came from the German-American Bund, Hitler’s stooges in the U.S. They harassed Jack Kirby and Joe Simon, the creators of Captain America, with hate mail and telephoned death threats.

“The theme was ‘death to the Jews,’” Simon wrote in his memoir. “At first we were inclined to laugh off their threats, but whoop-assthen, people in the office reported seeing menacing-looking groups of strange men in front of the building on 42nd Street, and some of the employees were fearful of leaving the office for lunch.”

[read the full text at National Review]

Simon called the cops, and as soon as the police showed up, the phone rang. Mayor Fiorello La Guardia wanted to speak to the creators of Captain America. Simon got on the line. “You boys over there are doing a good job,” the voice squeaked. “The city of New York will see that no harm will come to you.’”

That is how it’s supposed to work in a democracy.

Unfortunately, America decided to go a different way with the movie The Interview, a reportedly lowbrow comedy about two low-rent TV guys asked to use their interview with North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un as an assassination opportunity.

Computer hackers going by the name “Guardians of the Peace,” but clearly henchmen for the North Korean regime, attacked Sony Pictures Entertainment, spilling the company’s internal e-mails, payroll data, and even scripts and rough cuts of some yet-to-be-released movies onto the Internet…(read more)

National Review Online

— Jonah Goldberg is a senior editor of National Review and a fellow at the American Enterprise Institute.

 



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