Crackdown: Chinese Communist Party Warns Officials: ‘Calligraphy Isn’t for Amateurs’

ashamed-chinese-officials

Doing calligraphy, along with playing badminton, is a one of the few hobbies government officials in China admit to having

James T. Areddy and Lilian Lin report: Officials should put down their calligraphy brushes and stick to governing.

calligraphy

“The problem today, according to the editorial, comes when officials promote their squiggles as valuable works of art.”

A new warning to officials about their calligraphy is the latest anti-corruption guideline from the Chinese Communist Party’s Central Commission for Discipline Inspection.

calligraphy-brushes

“Officials should put down their calligraphy brushes and stick to governing.”

Wang Qishan, the Politburo Standing Committee member who heads the party’s anti-graft commission, hit out at the traditional craft during a plenary meeting of the organization last week in Beijing, and the message was backed up by an editorial from the agency posted on Tuesday to its website.

Central Commission for Discipline Inspection

Central Commission for Discipline Inspection

Officials shouldn’t “grab meat from the plates of artists,” the editorial said.

Doing calligraphy, along with playing badminton, is a one of the few hobbies government officials in China tend to admit to having. State leaders often pen well-wishes in calligraphy when they drop into companies around the country, creating valuable mementos that tend to get BN-GN087_callig_E_20150120025827displayed in prominent spots in the companies.

 “As you have promised to make contribution to the party and to the country, why are you greedy for an unnecessary title for unjustified interests?”

Officials can be forgiven for thinking it’s OK to strive for recognition in calligraphy, an art form associated with erudition and wisdom. Chinese leaders from Qing dynasty emperor Qianlong to Mao Zedong have been celebrated for their ability to put brush to paper, though there is some debate as to whether the latter’s distinctive style deserved the praise the Communist Party has lavished upon it ever since.

The problem today, according to the editorial, comes when officials promote their squiggles as valuable works of art.

The admonishment takes particular aim at officials who scramble for seats atop artistic associations, suggesting the positions are little more than grabs to establish credibility in the absence of artistic ability – and therefore a ticket to higher priced sales.

Calling it “trendy” for officials to insert themselves into an artistic association…(read more)

China Real Time Report – WSJ



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