Katherine Timpf: Actually, Red-Carpet Reporters Should Ask What You’re Wearing

Reese

Katherine Timpfpage_2014_200_timpf writes: According to the people behind the #AskHerMore social-media campaign, the red carpet is sexist because reporters ask women about their clothing and appearance more often than they ask men.

“There’s an element of being an actress in Hollywood, it’s like worsening a product,” Jennifer Siebel Newsom, founder and CEO of the Representation Project that started the campaign, told The Hollywood Reporter.

“People actually do care about what these actresses are wearing. A lot of people get their fashion and beauty tips from celebrities — the amount of television programs, websites, and magazine articles about this very subject proves that.”

“It’s like you’re a prostitute,” she continued. “It’s like you owe someone something and you don’t.”

The Official Fainting Couch

The Official Fainting Couch

[Read the full text of Katherine Timpf‘s article here, at National Review]

The idiocy of her notion that having to deal with someone asking you where you got your bajillion dollar gown is like working in the sex industry is asinine  — and so is the idea that these celebrities don’t owe anyone anything in this situation, especially considering how many of them get their gowns for free or even have the designers paying them to wear their clothes.

“The idiocy of her notion that having to deal with someone asking you where you got your bajillion dollar gown is like working in the sex industry is asinine…”

As New York Times fashion director and critic Vanessa Friedman Tweeted: “Sorry #AskHerMore, but the red carpet is a prison of actresses’ own making. They profited, literally, from it for a long time. #Oscars2015”

And as Washington Post fashion critic Robin Givhan tweeted, even if they aren’t getting the gown free, the people who made it still deserve some credit: “#askhermore frankly, I’d like to know who’s responsible for the incredible gowns that a village of artisans worked on for 100s of hours.”

After all, most of the big stars’ dresses are custom-designed and custom-made. The talent and hard work of the designers shouldn’t be ignored just because self-righteous movie stars can’t bear the thought of being asked about anything less weighty than…(read more)

National Review

— Katherine Timpf is a reporter for National Review Online.

 



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