GERMANY OR BUST: Migrants Flee Hungary, March to One Particular European Country

So flagrant is Hungary’s apparent animosity for migrants that the U.N. said its leaders had declined to accept assistance from the agency that supports refugees.

LONDON —  Haggard and defiant, hundreds of migrants stormed out of the Keleti train station in Budapest on Friday and set off on foot towards Germany, choosing a 300-mile walk over spending another night in a country where they are not welcome.

“This is going to go down in history,” said Rami Hassoun, an Egyptian migrant from Alexandria helping to corral the crowds on a six-lane highway to Austria, where the migrants were accompanied by a police patrol.

Elsewhere, hundreds of migrants remained locked in a standoff with the police at the Bicske station outside Budapest, demanding that train service to the west be restored, so they could continue their journeys to more prosperous European countries, like Germany or Sweden.

drudge-migrants-march

Hundreds of others stormed out of a reception camp in the country’s south, highlighting their desperation to flee.

The chaos in Hungary reflected the inadequacy of an asylum policy across the 28-member European Union bloc that has forced migrants to register or apply for asylum in the country where they arrive — though in many cases that becomes the country where they are discovered or detained by authorities.

[Read the full text here, at The New York Times]

Once they register and apply, they must remain in that country — even if that country, like Hungary, is so hostile to migrants that it is building a 110-mile fence on its border with Serbia to keep them away.

On Friday, as the humanitarian crisis involving tens of thousands of migrants continued, lawmakers introduced changes to its penal code that would impose tougher measures on migrants — including a new law that makes crossing or damaging the fence punishable by prison or expulsion.

So flagrant is Hungary’s apparent animosity for migrants that the U.N. said its leaders had declined to accept assistance from the agency that supports refugees, including for migrants at Keleti, the main Budapest railway station, where thousands have been stranded in recent days without adequate food, lodgings or water….(read more)

Source: The New York Times



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