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Study Crashes Main Moon-Formation Theory

moon

Paris (AFP) – The Moon, our planet’s constant companion for some 4.5 billion years, may have been forged by a rash of smaller bodies smashing into an embryonic Earth, researchers said Monday.

Such a bombardment birth would explain a major inconsistency in the prevailing hypothesis that the Moon splintered off in a single, giant impact between Earth and a Mars-sized celestial body.

“The multiple impact scenario is a more ‘natural’ way of explaining the formation of the Moon.”

In such a scenario, scientists expect that about a fifth of the Moon’s material would have come from Earth and the rest from the impacting body.

Yet, the makeup of the Earth and the Moon are near identical — an improbability that has long perplexed backers of the single-impact hypothesis.

“In the early stages of the Solar System, impacts were very abundant, therefore it is more natural that several common impactors formed the Moon rather than one special one.”

“The multiple impact scenario is a more ‘natural’ way of explaining the formation of the Moon,” said Raluca Rufu of the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot, who co-authored the new study published in the journal Nature Geoscience.

Such multiple hits would have excavated more Earth material than a single one, which means the moonlets would more closely resemble our planet’s composition, said the study authors.

Rufu and a team created nearly a thousand computer simulations of collisions between a proto-Earth and embryonic planets called planetesimals, smaller than Mars.

Every collision would have formed a disk of debris around the proto-Earth which would, in turn, clump together to form a “moonlet”, they found.

Moonlets would eventually coalesce to form the Moon….(read more)

Source: AFP

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