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Princeton’s Surreal ‘Diversity Training’ for Students

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 writes: We live in the age of inclusion where we are to be welcomed and treated equally, but, paradoxically, we are all to be labeled clearly so that everyone knows what status we may embody. Take college campuses, the incubator of liberalism gone amok. So-called “diversity training” has attempted to make students painfully aware of all of their differences (well, all differences but ones of opinion, since diversity of thought has become intolerable in academia).

“know your kind and stick to it. Don’t risk offending people from other backgrounds by trying to understand their worldviews.”

Student Carrie Pritt recently wrote of her experience as an incoming freshman at Princeton University, where different labels (white, male, wealthy) were rattled off and students were asked to stand if they identified with that group. “But what did it really accomplish?” she asked. “In compressing us into isolated communities based on our race, religion or gender, the minister belittled every other piece of our identities.” He faced a crowd of singular young adults and essentially told them that their heritage outweighed their humanity.

campus-censorship

The message was clear: “know your kind and stick to it. Don’t risk offending people from other backgrounds by trying to understand their worldviews.” Although she understands that the university was trying to do something good, Carrie wonders, “Why were the university administrators, who speak so highly of diversity, choosing to strip us of our individuality?” It’s a good question.

Trying to fit us all into neat little boxes rather than celebrating our individuality is never a good idea; even readers of the New York Times agree. The left-leaning paper ran an article entitled “Campus 101: Learning How Not to Offend,” and letters to the editor came pouring in to push back. … (read more)

Source: Acculturated

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One Comment on “Princeton’s Surreal ‘Diversity Training’ for Students”


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