Science & Fiction: 10 Technologies That Are Changing the Game


3-D Printing That Matters: Pancake Bot! Miguel Valenzuela’s Robotic Pancake ‘Printer’

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CHICAGO (CBS) — For generations, moms and dads across America have tried to dazzle their kids on the weekends, creating silly designs out of pancakes.

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Typically, it would involve creating some sort of animal out of the batter. (Think, Mickey Mouse.)

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Miguel Valenzuela aims to change that game, with the Pancake Bot–which is essentially a device that prints flapjacks. Read the rest of this entry »


The Bullet That Could Make 3D-Printed Guns Practical Deadly Weapons

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 writes: As 3-D printed guns have evolved over the past 18 months from a science-fictional experiment into a subculture, they’ve faced a fundamental limitation: Cheap plastic isn’t the best material to contain an explosive blast. Now an amateur gunsmith has instead found a way to transfer that stress to a component that’s actually made of metal—the ammunition.

“This is a building block for the future of 3-D printed firearms that will enable people to develop semiautomatic and—if you had the proper legal paperwork—even fully automatic weapons.”

Michael Crumling, a 25-year-old machinist from York, Pennsylvania, has developed a round designed specifically to be fired from 3-D printed guns. His ammunition uses a thicker steel shell with a lead bullet inserted an inch inside, deep enough that the shell can contain the explosion of the round’s gunpowder instead of transferring that force to the plastic body or barrel of the gun. Crumling says that allows a home-printed firearm made from even the cheapest materials to be fired again and againwired-3-D-bullets without cracking or deformation. And while his design isn’t easily replicated because the rounds must be individually machined for now, it may represent another step towards durable, practical, printed guns—even semi-automatic ones.

“It’s a really simple concept: It’s kind of a barrel integrated into the shell, so to speak. Basically it removes all the stresses and pressures from the 3-D printed parts. You should be able to fire an unlimited number of shots through the gun without replacing any parts other than the shell.”

Last week, for instance, Crumling shot 19 rounds from a 3-D printed gun of his own design created on an ultra-cheap $400 Printrbot printer using PLA plastic. (He concedes his gun isn’t completely 3-D printed; it uses some metal screws and a AR-15 trigger and firing hammer that he bought online for a total of $30. But he argues none of those parts affected the gun’s firing durability.) Though the gun misfired a few times, it didn’t suffer from any noticeable internal damage after all of those explosions. Here’s a time lapse video that shows 18 of those shots.

When the top of Crumling’s gun shattered in an earlier test, he determined that the breakage was caused by the shell’s movement, not the explosion inside of it. So in his most recent gun design, the roof of his gun’s chamber is left open. That allows the shell to eject itself.  Read the rest of this entry »


Not a Star Trek Replicator- but a Step in that Direction: 3D printer to International Space Station


[VIDEO] A Robot on a Hoverbike – Why Not?

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A Reddit Gun Lover Has A Hilarious Present For Anti-Gun Mother Jones

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 writes:  If there’s one thing the anti-gun zealots at Mother Jones hate, it’s firearms in the hands of law-abiding American citizens. If there’s another thing Mother Jones hates, it’s probably the ability of those same law-abiding citizens to manufacture their own means of self-defense from the comfort of their own homes via a 3D printer.

One gun lover at reddit decided to 3D-print his own homage to Mother Jones: a homemade lower receiver for an AR-15-style rifle, complete with serial number. And just for kicks, he made sure the serial number matched the phone number for the main office at Mother Jones. The redditor even printed the Mother Jones logo on the receiver.

Read the rest of this entry »