HOAX ALERT: Diver Claims Viral Porn Star Shark Bite Video was Staged

This porn star really was faking it.

Joshua Rhett Miller reports: A veteran shark diver claims the viral video featuring a porn star being attacked by a shark during a promo shoot last week was faked for publicity, RealClearLife.com reported.

Bryce Rohrer, owner and operator of Florida Shark Diving, said adult film actress Molly Cavalli wasn’t really attacked by a lemon shark off the coast of Florida during a promotional video for sex cam website CamSoda — and claimed they staged the stunt to get their name in the news.

“[Molly] said ‘we want to do a film shoot with a few scantily-clad women diving with sharks,’ and we were kin fog skeptical of even that,” Rohrer told the website. “Then once we started getting the facts of what they actually wanted to do … we declined.”

Rohrer claims Cavalli laid out her plans in a string of text messages, saying she wanted to stage the shark attack to make the clip go viral.

Rohrer claims Cavalli sent him this text message detailing her plan to stage an injury from a shark attack.

Rohrer claims Cavalli sent him this text message detailing her plan to stage an injury from a shark attack.

“She basically spelled out, ‘We want to do this fake bite, this is what we want it to look like,’” Rohrer said.

Darren Press, CamSoda’s vice president, later said in a statement that Cavalli was bitten as she swam near the surface. Read the rest of this entry »


Peggy Noonan: ‘It’s Not Really Hunger That’s Propelling Hillary Now, it’s Newton’s 1st law: Objects in Motion Tend to Stay in Motion’

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Hillary Seems Tired, Not Hungry

Peggy Noonan writes: Maybe we’re not stuck in Scandal Land.

For a while I’ve assumed Hillary Clinton would run for her party’s nomination and be a formidable candidate in the general election. After Tuesday’s news conference I’m not so sure.

Did she seem to you a happy, hungry warrior? She couldn’t make eye contact with her questioners, and when she did she couldn’t sustain it. She looked at the ceiling and down at notes, trying, it seemed, to stick to or remember scripted arguments. She was shaky. She couldn’t fake good cheer and confidence. It is seven years since she ran for office. You could see it.

“This wasn’t the work of a national, high-grade political-response team, it was the thrown-together mess of someone who knew she was guilty of self-serving actions, who didn’t herself believe what she was saying, who didn’t think the press would swallow it, and who didn’t appear to care.”

Her claims—she stayed off the State Department email system for “convenience,” she thought “it would be easier to carry just one device,” her server “contains personal communications from my husband and me”—were so transparent, so quickly disprovable. Minutes later journalists were posting earlier statements in which she said she carries two devices, and The Wall Street Journal’s report saying Bill has sent only two emails in his life.

“She didn’t look hungry for the battle, she looked tired of the battle.”

This wasn’t high-class spin. These were not respectable dodges. They didn’t make you grudgingly tip your hat at a gift for duplicity. I could almost feel an army of oppo people of both parties saying, “You can do better than that, Hillary!”

This wasn’t the work of a national, high-grade political-response team, it was the thrown-together mess of someone who knew she was guilty of self-serving actions, who didn’t herself believe what she was saying, who didn’t think the press would swallow it, and who didn’t appear to care.

She didn’t look hungry for the battle, she looked tired of the battle.

“Defenses of Mrs. Clinton were ad hoc, improvised, flat-footed. It all looks disorderly, as if no one’s in charge, no one has drawn clear lines of responsibility or authority. We hear about loyalists, intimates, allies, pals, hangers-on, Friends of Hill. People buzz around her like bees on random paths to the queen.”

Everyone knows what the scandal is. She didn’t want a paper trail of her decisions and actions as secretary of state. She didn’t want to be questioned about them, ever. So she didn’t join the government’s paper-trail system, in this case the State Department’s official email system, which retains and archives records. She built her own private system and got to keep complete control of everything she’d done or written. She no doubt assumed no one outside would ask and no one inside would insist—she’s Hillary, don’t mess with her.

“Is this thing really happening? Is the much-vaunted campaign coming together?”

She knew the story might blow but maybe it wouldn’t, worth the chance considering the payoff: secrecy. If what she did became public she’d deal with it then. When this week she was forced to, she stonewalled: “The server will remain private.”

Is it outrageous? Of course. Those are U.S. government documents she concealed and destroyed. The press is not covering for her and hard questions are being asked because everyone knows what the story is. It speaks of who she is and how she will govern. Everyone knows it.

She knows it too. Read the rest of this entry »


Brutally Honest New Revlon Ad Campaign Reminds Customers You Can’t Change What You Are

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Revlon executives say their products cannot conceal the horrors inside of you.

NEW YORK—Asserting that makeup can do little beyond creating a fleeting illusion of youth and beauty, cosmetics giant Revlon launched a new series of ads this week aimed at reminding its customers they will never be able to change what they are.

The company’s “You Are What You Are” campaign, which debuted with dark and haunting multi-page spreads in several major fashion magazines, cautions consumers that, at best, makeup is a sad disguise people hide behind in a futile attempt to avoid uncomfortable facts about their true nature.

“If you’re disappointed by what you see on the outside, just imagine how horrifying you must be on the inside…”

“With our new ad campaign, we want to emphasize that you can buy all the lotions, powders, and fragrances you want, but you can’t escape who you really are: a fragile, flawed, and ultimately insignificant being who is tormented by fear and insecurity,” Revlon vice president Vivian Falk said in a press release introducing the advertisements. “It’s fine to use our products if they make you feel a little more attractive, but just remember it’s only a temporary distraction from the terrifying reality of your barren, unfulfilling life.”

“Your existence is a dismal and feeble one, and no amount of mascara is ever going to change that,” Falk added. Read the rest of this entry »


The Apocalypse is Here: State Department bureau spent $630,000 on Facebook ‘likes’

State Department officials spent $630,000 to get more Facebook “likes,” prompting employees to complain to a government watchdog that the bureau was “buying fans” in social media, the agency’s inspector general says.

The department’s Bureau of International Information Programs spent the money to increase its “likes” count between 2011 and March 2013.

“Many in the bureau criticize the advertising campaigns as ‘buying fans’ who may have once clicked on an ad or ‘liked’ a photo but have no real interest in the topic and have never engaged further,” the inspector general reported.

The spending increased the bureau’s English-language Facebook page likes from 100,000 to more than 2 million and to 450,000 on Facebook’s foreign-language pages.

Despite the surge in likes, the IG said the effort failed to reach the bureau’s target audience, which is largely older and more influential than the people liking its pages. Only about 2 percent of fans actually engage with the pages by liking, sharing or commenting.
Read the rest of this entry »