Philadelphia Gun Range Owner And Activist Say ‘Black Guns Matter’

“No one can deny, with the things that have happened over the last few weeks, we’re being murdered by law enforcement — and in our own community — at alarming rates,” said Maj Toure.

There was one shooting every six hours on average last year in Philadelphia. In the past 10 years, more than 14,500 shootings occurred, with at least 2,600 killed by guns — many of whom were black residents.negores-guns-book

“What I can say to the American people from whatever background you are, is exercise your Second Amendment rights. Be open-minded, be objective and learn.”

— Maj Toure

While some see the numbers as a reason to increase gun control, others see things differently.

Yuri Zalzman of North Philadelphia’s The Gun Range and Maj Toure of the activist group Black Guns Matter have come together to try to find solutions.

[Read the full story here, at Here & Now]

Both teach inner-city residents how to properly handle firearms and believe the effort to reduce the number of guns in the city would mean residents would be less safe.

[Check out Nicholas Johnson’s book “Negroes and the Gun: The Black Tradition of Arms” at Amazon]

[Also see – [VIDEO] How the Civil Rights Movement Changed Black Gun Culture]

Here & Now’s Robin Young visited The Gun Range and spoke with Zalzman and Toure about their efforts.

The Constitution and Bill of Rights hang on the wall of The Gun Range in North Philadelphia. (Dean Russell/Here & Now)

The Constitution and Bill of Rights hang on the wall of The Gun Range in North Philadelphia. (Dean Russell/Here & Now)

Interview Highlights: Maj Toure & Yuri Zalzman

On individuals and gun ownership

Maj Toure: “For one they should choose to exercise anything that will defend themselves. If someone has a firearm and you don’t, you lose. That’s it. No different than if someone has a knife and you don’t have the means to defend yourself, you lose.

So I think that the community that I’m from, I think that information is deliberately kept away. It’s made to seem that if you have a firearm you’re either law enforcement or you must be the bad guy. No one can deny, with the things that have happened over the last few weeks, we’re being murdered by law enforcement — and in our own community — at alarming rates.”

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On police in Dallas being suspicious of black men who were carrying rifles

Toure: “That’s the police officers’ and law enforcement’s responsibility to balance that out. Because there’s one or two or a few bad apples, I wouldn’t say throw the whole bunch out. You cannot group and have a monolithic statement or blanket solution for everyone when people don’t fall in alignment with that particular… I don’t even think it’s even a level of confusion. That’s law enforcement’s responsibility to be better trained and execute their duties in a much more productive way.”

On how Dallas police had to control the situation with the shooterYuri Zalzman: “What we’re talking about is one additional, very unfortunate tragic event. We don’t normally have these situations I think that the discussion should not take place on the fringes, no more than it is pleasant to have a conversation with somebody whose thoughts are at the extremes one way or the other. Read the rest of this entry »

[VIDEO] Is There a Wrong Side of History?

Are you on the wrong side or the right side of history? Is there even a “wrong side” or a “right side”? What do those terms mean and why do politicians and pundits use them? Nationally syndicated columnist and best-selling author Jonah Goldberg explains.

time-travel

You can support Prager University by clicking here. Free videos are great, but to continue producing high-quality content, even small contributions are greater. Read the rest of this entry »


BREAKING: Rachel Dolezal Steps Down as President of Spokane NAACP

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Exposed for Reporting Fictional Hate Crimes, Caught Misrepresenting her Ethnic Identity, Outed by Her Own Mom, Rachel Dolenzal Resigns Presidency of NAACP

SPOKANE, Washington –  The President of the Spokane chapter of the NAACP resigned her post Monday morning after days of controversy swirled around her own ethnicity…rachel-d-busted!

“This is not about me. It’s about justice.”

Here is the complete statement:

Dear Executive Committee and NAACP Members,

It is a true honor to serve in the racial and social justice movement here in Spokane and across the nation. Many issues face us now that drive at the theme of urgency. Police brutality, biased curriculum in schools, economic disenfranchisement, health inequities, and a lack of pro-justice political representation are among the concerns at the forefront of the current administration of the Spokane NAACP. And yet, the dialogue has unexpectedly shifted internationally to my personal identity in the context of defining race and ethnicity.

I have waited in deference while others expressed their feelings, beliefs, confusions and even conclusions – absent the full story. I am consistently committed to empowering marginalized voices and believe that many individuals have been heard in the last hours and days that would not otherwise have had a platform to weigh in on this important discussion. Additionally, I have always deferred to the state and national NAACP leadership and offer my sincere gratitude for their unwavering support of my leadership through this unexpected firestorm.

While challenging the construct of race is at the core of evolving human consciousness, we can NOT afford to lose sight of the five Game Changers (Criminal Justice & Public Safety, Health & Healthcare, Education, Economic Sustainability, and Voting Rights & Political Representation) that affect millions, often with a life or death outcome. The movement is larger than a moment in time or a single person’s story, and I hope that everyone offers their robust support of the Journey for Justice campaign that the NAACP launches today!

I am delighted that so many organizations and individuals have supported and collaborated with the Spokane NAACP under my leadership to grow this branch into one of the healthiest in the nation in 5 short months. In the eye of this current storm, I can see that a separation of family and organizational outcomes is in the best interest of the NAACP.

It is with complete allegiance to the cause of racial and social justice and the NAACP that I step aside from the Presidency and pass the baton to my Vice President, Naima Quarles-Burnley. It is my hope that by securing a beautiful office for the organization in the heart of downtown, bringing the local branch into financial compliance, catalyzing committees to do strategic work in the five Game Changer issues, launching community forums, putting the membership on a fast climb, and helping many individuals find the legal, financial and practical support needed to fight race-based discrimination, I have positioned the Spokane NAACP to buttress this transition.

Read the rest of this entry »


#BaltimoreRiots: Violence Breaks Out in Baltimore After Freddie Gray’s Funeral

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Police officers injured in clashes; mayor imposes overnight curfew starting Tuesday evening

BALTIMORE— Scott Calvert and Kris Maher report: Violent confrontations between demonstrators and police broke out in this city for the second time in three days, hours after thousands of people attended Monday’s funeral for Freddie Gray , a 25-year-old black man who died in police custody this month.

“Right now, we’re seeing unprecedented violence throughout the city.”

— Darryl DeSousa, chief of patrol for the city police department

Fifteen officers were injured and two were hospitalized, police officials said. Earlier Monday a police spokesman said the injuries included broken bones. One patrol car was attacked and at least one more engulfed in flames as looters ransacked stores. A CVS store was looted, then apparently set on fire. At least 27 people were arrested.

“It is so frustrating that people think that this makes sense, to destroy our community.”

— Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake

The altercations took place along several busy intersections near the Mondawmin Mall in northwest Baltimore, in a neighborhood near the church where the funeral was held. Demonstrators pelted lines of police in riot gear with rocks, bricks and other objects.

Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake hugs a member of the Gray family during Freddie Gray's funeral. Photo: Shawn Hubbard for The Wall Street Journal

Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake hugs a member of the Gray family during Freddie Gray’s funeral. Photo: Shawn Hubbard for The Wall Street Journal

Police responded with tear gas and set up a cordon seeking to restore order. Chunks of bricks, rocks and broken glass littered the streets, and smoke from burning cars and trash cans rose into the sky. The Maryland Transit Administration closed several subway stops near the unrest, and the Baltimore Orioles baseball game was canceled.

“It began as a cause and is ending in pure ignorance.”

— Sean Berry-Bey, a 33-year-old resident of West Baltimore

“Right now, we’re seeing unprecedented violence throughout the city,” said Darryl DeSousa, chief of patrol for the city police department.

[Read the full text here, at the Wall Street Journal]

Gov. Larry Hogan declared a state of emergency Monday evening, activating the Maryland National Guard. Maryland State Police troopers arrived on the scene earlier in the evening, as did police from several counties, including Prince George’s County, outside Washington.

Demonstrators throw rocks at police in Baltimore after the funeral of Freddie Gray on Monday. Photo: Jose Luis Magana/Associated Press

Demonstrators throw rocks at police in Baltimore after the funeral of Freddie Gray on Monday. Photo: Jose Luis Magana/Associated Press

Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake imposed a citywide 10 p.m. to 5 a.m. curfew beginning Tuesday evening and lasting at least a week. “It is so frustrating that people think that this makes sense, to destroy our community,” the mayor said. Read the rest of this entry »


Reverend Sam Mosteller: ‘Let me just say it this way, I am going to have to advocate at this point that all African-Americans advocate their Second Amendment right’

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President Of MLK Group Advocates For Second Amendment

Chuck Ross reports: The president of the Georgia chapter of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference said Tuesday nonviolence is not working and African-Americans should ”avail themselves” to their Second Amendment rights.

Rev. Sam Mosteller made the statements during a press conference Tuesday in Atlanta. He and members of SCLC, which was co-founded by Martin Luther King Jr. in 1957, were protesting the recent shootings of two young black men in the state.

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“You know, the SCLC stands for nonviolence, but nonviolence hasn’t worked in this instance,” Mosteller said, according to My Fox Atlanta.

“Let me just say it this way, I am going to have to advocate at this point that all African-Americans advocate their Second Amendment right,” he added. Read the rest of this entry »


Cartoonist Barry Blitt the Cover of Next Week’s New Yorker: ‘…the reconciliation of people who seemed so hard to reconcile’

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The artist Barry Blitt on his inspiration for next week’s cover:

“It struck me that King’s vision was both the empowerment of African-Americans, the insistence on civil rights, but also the reconciliation of people who seemed so hard to reconcile”

The New Yorker


A Shocker From NPR: ‘Guns Made the Civil Rights Movement Possible’

For NewsBustersTim Graham reports: The liberals at National Public Radio can’t really imagine guns being necessary for anything…unless perhaps it’s to keep Southern segregationists at bay.

"Legitimate self defense has absolutely nothing to do with the criminal misuse of guns." —Gerald Vernon, veteran firearms instructor

“Legitimate self defense has absolutely nothing to do with the criminal misuse of guns.”
—Gerald Vernon, veteran firearms instructor

On Thursday afternoon’s Tell Me More talk show, host Michel Martin brought on Charles Cobb, who wrote the book This Nonviolent Stuff’ll Get You Killed: How Guns Made The Civil Rights Movement Possible. She called it a “hiding in plain sight story” and asked why he wrote the book:

COBB: I’m very conscious of the gaps in the history, and one important gap in the history and the portrayal of the movement is the role of guns in the movement. I worked in the South. I lived with families in the South. There was never a family I stayed with that didn’t have a gun. I know from personal experience and the experiences of others that guns kept people alive, kept communities safe. And all you have to do to understand this is simply think of black people as human beings, and they’re going to respond to terrorism the way anybody else would….

MARTIN: Why do you think we don’t know more stories like this? Read the rest of this entry »