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Kentucky Fried Microaggression

chicken

Gastronomically correct students at an ultra-liberal Ohio college are in an uproar because the cafeteria food isn’t ethnically accurate enough.

Students at Oberlin College are so angered by the “insensitive” and “culturally appropriative” offerings at their Dascomb Dining Hall that they are filling screeds of protest in the school newspaper and even demanded a meeting with Campus Dining Service officials and the college president.

“When you’re cooking a country’s dish for other people, including ones who have never tried the original dish before, you’re also representing the meaning of the dish as well as its culture.”

At issue are foods such as General Tso’s chicken being served with steamed chicken instead of fried — which is not authentically Chinese, and simply “weird,” one student bellyached.

[Read the full text here, at New York Post]

Others were up in arms over Banh Mi Vietnamese sandwiches served with coleslaw instead of pickled vegetables on ciabatta bread — rather than traditional French baguette.

“How could they just throw out something completely different and label it as another country’s traditional food?”

“It was ridiculous,” Diep Nguyen, a freshman who is a Vietnam native, told The Oberlin Review, the school newspaper.

“How could they just throw out something completely different and label it as another country’s traditional food?”

“So if people not from that heritage take food, modify it and serve it as ‘authentic,’ it is appropriative.”

Not only that, but the sushi rice was undercooked in a way that was, according to one Japanese student, “disrespectful” of her culture.

That student, Tomoyo Joshi, a junior from Japan, was very offended by this flagrant violation of her rice. Read the rest of this entry »


[VIDEO] Americans Forget Martin Luther King and What He Did – First African American to Walk on the Moon?

Americans Forget Martin Luther King and What He Did. Mark Dice interviews beachgoers in San Diego about MLK for Martin Luther King Day 2015.

 


What Do Kobe Bryant and Zora Neale Huston Have in Common? (Besides Racial Identity)

kobe-huston

Re: the Trayvon Martin case:

“I won’t react to something just because I’m supposed to, because I’m an African-American” 

wearetrayvon-tweet-img

To which Bryant replied:

“I won’t react to something just because I’m supposed to, because I’m an African-American,” he said. “That argument doesn’t make any sense to me. So we want to advance as a society and a culture, but, say, if something happens to an African-American we immediately come to his defense? Yet you want to talk about how far we’ve progressed as a society? Well, we’ve progressed as a society, then don’t jump to somebody’s defense just because they’re African-American. You sit and you listen to the facts just like you would in any other situation, right? So I won’t assert myself.”

For those that remember early 20th Century Harlem Renaissance artist Zora Neale Huston, whose contribution to Ethnography, Anthropology, and Literature made her a rock star in her time (Zora’s popularity reemerged in the 1980s when Alice Walker reintroduced her work) not many remember that Huston’s political views were contrary.

[check out Zora Neale Huston‘s classic book Their Eyes Were Watching God at Amazon]

Neale was a conservative. Unlike many of her literary peers, she rejected notions of group identity, grievance, and identity politics. Though we’re not suggesting Kobe Bryant is a conservative, Neale and Bryant both declined to speak for the “black community”, believing that we should be beyond that. Once asked to comment on a news-making achievement of a fellow African American (just because she, too, is black) her response was not unlike Bryant’s. It was identical. Huston said dismissively (though not an exact quote, this is the gist of her comment):

“When Thomas Edison invented the light bulb, do you think white people jumped for joy (that one of their race made this achievement)?’ 

Which expresses the same common-sense rejection of racial grouping Kobe Bryant expresses here:

“Well, we’ve progressed as a society, then don’t jump to somebody’s defense just because they’re African-American. You sit and you listen to the facts just like you would in any other situation, right?”

From NRO: Hurston held a fiercely asserted black conservative politics akin to Clarence Thomas’s. Her most famous statement in this vein comes from How It Feels to Be Colored Me,” an essay of 1928:

“I am not tragically colored. There is no great sorrow dammed up in my soul, nor lurking behind my eyes. . . . I do not belong to the sobbing school of Negrohood who hold that nature has somehow given them a lowdown dirty deal and whose feelings are all hurt about it.”

Commentary from Hot Air’s ALLAHPUNDIT, and a Video after the jump

Read the rest of this entry »