Comic Panel from a Canadian edition (in French) of Iron Man #151, an Ant-Man story

ant-man

From a Canadian edition (in French) of Iron Man #151, an Ant-Man story.

Some days after an attack on Stark International headquarters, Scott Lang, a technician, must do some repairs in a facility.  Some drops of a corrosive liquid falls through the central computer.  The security system, out of control, locks down the building and tries to kill Lang. He puts his Ant-Man costume, becomes small and, with the help of some ants, goes inside the computer to fix it. 

This issue was one of my few comics when I was a kid. I liked this story a lot. There was some suspense, the character was more vulnerable than most heroes. And the ability to become miniature and to communicate with ants seemed fantastic. So, I feel some excitement for the Ant-Man movie. If this is well done, that could be fun to see a scene like the picture above in 3D. 


[VIDEO] Latest Ant-Man Trailer Shows Why it Could Be the Funniest Marvel Movie Yet

 writes:

…The story of the Ant-Man character is an interesting one, but all you really need to know is that Paul Rudd’s character, Scott Lang, is a reformed thief with a chance to do good… by stealing something. The stakes are high for Lang and his loved ones, but the patented Marvel sense of humor appears to be intact as well.

ant-man-tv-spot

“If this technology gets out, it’s going to be chaos.”

Hank Pym, the original Ant-Man, tells Lang. His response?

“I think our first move should be calling The Avengers.”

Read more…

BRG.com


Today in Comic Book History, December 11, 1942: Captain Marvel Adventures #18

Captain-Marvel

TODAY IN COMIC BOOK HISTORY: December 11, 1942

In the pages of Captain Marvel Adventures #18 we learn Billy Batson has a long lost twin sister, Mary Batson. Mary is based off of actress Judy Garland by artist Marc Swayze and soon gains the same powers as her brother and is later dubbed Mary Marvel.

Mary Marvel would go on to headline her own book with supporting characters such as Uncle Marvel. Although Wonder Woman debuted a year earlier, Mary Marvel gained a great following especially from younger girls.

In the mid-fifties Fawcett Publications ceased the Mary Marvel books and all the Captain Marvel Family titles due to a copyright lawsuit by DC, and she wouldn’t be seen again for 20 years. DC eventually started publishing stories about the Marvel Family in the early 70s under the title “Shazam”. Read the rest of this entry »