BREAKING: Port of Charleston Terminal Evacuated Over ‘Potential Threat’

Authorities are investigating a ‘potential threat’ in a container aboard a ship at the Port of Charleston in South Carolina.

Authorities are investigating a “potential threat” in a container aboard a ship at the Port of Charleston in South Carolina, the US Coast Guard said Wednesday night.

The ship, Maersk Memphis, is at the Wando terminal. The terminal is used for container cargo, and has been evacuated to allow federal, state and local bomb detection units to investigate, the Coast Guard said.

The threat came in at about 8 p.m. ET, the Coast Guard said in a statement.

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It later tweeted that a “safety zone has been established around the vessel while law enforcement authorities investigate the threat.”

#Update A 1 NM safety zone has been established around the vessel while law enforcement authorities investigate the threat.

— USCGSoutheast (@USCGSoutheast) June 15, 2017

Capt. Greg Stump, the commander for the Coast Guard sector in Charleston, told ABCNews4 that a YouTube “conspiracy theorist” made a claim about a threat on board one of the ships.

Source: kcci.com

Coast Guard: FBI investigating report of dirty bomb in South Carolina.

MOUNT PLEASANT, S.C. (WCSC) – The U.S. Coast Guard is telling WCSC-TV in South Carolina that both state and federal authorities are investigating a potential dirty bomb threat at the Wando Terminal Wednesday night.

“the Maersk Memphis is currently moored at Charleston’s Wando terminal which has been evacuated while bomb detection units from federal, state and local law enforcement agencies investigate the threat.”

— Coast Guard official

According to witnesses on the scene, the terminal was evacuated and agents were seen taping off the ship.

A dirty bomb is an explosive made with radioactive material.  Read the rest of this entry »


CHESS WORLD ROCKED: 2200 Year-Old Walrus Bones Suggest Medieval Chess Set Might be Icelandic in Origin

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Carbon dating of walrus bones found in Snæfellsnes peninsula indicates that the bones are at least 2000 years old. A large number of walrus skulls and walrus tusks have been found around Garðafjara beach on the south coast Snæfellsnes. The first skull was discovered 1884. All in all the bones of 50 walruses have been found, most in the past 50 years. Biologists argue this indicates Snæfellsnes was the home of a sizable walrus colony prior to the settlement of Iceland.

A previous theory, explaining the concentration of bone discoveries, speculated they came from the wreck of a ship which had been carrying walrus bones to Europe. However, the existence of a large walrus colony in Iceland would have meant the accumulation of walrus skeletons and skulls which would have been discovered by the Viking age settlers of Iceland…(read more)


Pundit Planet Bureau of Really Old Shoes

Oldest-shoe-leather

A woman’s size four, it was made from a single piece of cured cowhide a thousand years before the Great Pyramid of Giza was built – and four hundred years earlier than the erection of Stonehenge.

June 2010, : The oldest known footwear in the world are 8,000 year old makeshift sandals made of plant material that were found in a cave in Missouri about fifty years ago.

Not much is known about the people who wore the shoe but it is thought they would have been some of the earliest farmers or nomadic tribes that used the oldest-shoecave as a base.

“It was only when the material was dated by the two radiocarbon laboratories in Oxford and California that we realised that the shoe was older by a few hundred years than the shoes worn by Otzi, the Iceman.”

The caves is 4,500 ft above sea level, very rocky and temperatures vary form -10 C in winter to 40 C in summer.

A woman’s size four, it was made from a single piece of cured cowhide a thousand years before the Great Pyramid of Giza was built – and four hundred years earlier than the erection of Stonehenge.

Amazingly, it is still in perfect condition – even including the laces – thanks to the stable, cool and dry conditions of the Armenian cave in which it was found.

“It is an amazing find. We thought we were looking at something just a few hundred years old but it turns out to be oldest shoe ever found.”

— Archaeologist Dr Ron Pinhasi

It would have fitted the foot of a woman today – although it may have been worn by a man at the time, claim the researchers.

Dr Ron Pinhasi, an archaeologist at the University College Cork, said: “It is an amazing find. We thought we were looking at something just a few hundred years old but it turns out to be oldest shoe ever found.”

The shoe was packed with grass, but it is unclear whether this was to keep the foot warm or to maintain the shape of the shoe, much like the modern shoe-tree.

Other items discovered in the cave in the Vayotz Dzor province on the Iranian border included large containers, many of which held well-preserved wheat and barley, apricots and other edible plants. Read the rest of this entry »


Researchers Believe They Have Identified Remains of ‘Don Quixote’ Author Cervantes

Cervantes

Cervantes died one year after his magnum opus, The Ingenious Gentleman Don Quixote of La Mancha, was published in 1615.

MADRID— Jeannette Neumann reports: Researchers announced Tuesday they believe they have identified some of the 400-year-old remains of Miguel de Cervantes, the author of “The Ingenious Gentleman Don Quixote of La Mancha,” considered the first modern novel.

“We are convinced that among these fragments, we have something of Cervantes. However, I can’t say that with absolutely certainty.”

— Francisco Etxeberria, a lead researcher on the project

Researchers said they weren’t able to individually or categorically identify Cervantes’ remains in a Madrid convent after four centuries of deterioration that have left many of the bones as fragments.

But based on a combination of historic documentation that details where Cervantes was buried and anthropological evidence about the age of the bones and clothing, researchers said they were mostly convinced they had found remains of Spain’s prince of prose.

“Between 1698 and 1730, researchers said construction to expand that church lead to the removal of 17 bodies nearby to what is now the crypt of the Convent of the Barefoot Trinitarians in central Madrid. Cervantes and his wife were among the 17 bodies that were moved.”

“We are convinced that among these fragments, we have something of Cervantes,” Francisco Etxeberria, a lead researcher on the project, said at a news conference Tuesday at Madrid’s city hall. “However, I can’t say that with absolutely certainty.”

Cervantes died one year after his magnum opus, which follows the adventures of the knight errant Don Quixote and his sidekick, was published in 1615. But only in the last 12 months has a serious hunt for his remains been launched. Read the rest of this entry »


Ancient DNA Shows Earliest European Genomes Weathered the Ice Age

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A ground-breaking new study on DNA recovered from a fossil of one of the earliest known Europeans – a man who lived 36,000 years ago in Kostenki, western Russia – has shown that the earliest European humans’ genetic ancestry survived the Last Glacial Maximum: the peak point of the last ice age.

The study also uncovers a more accurate timescale for when humans and Neanderthals interbred, and finds evidence for an early contact between the European hunter-gatherers and those in the Middle East – who would later develop agriculture and disperse into Europe about 8,000 years ago, transforming the European gene pool. Read the rest of this entry »


Ancient Roman Silver Treasure Revealed

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LOS ANGELES — Accidentally discovered by a French farmer plowing his field near the village of Berthouville in rural Normandy in 1830, the spectacular hoard of gilt-silver statuettes and vessels known as the Berthouville Treasure was an ancient offering to the Gallo-Roman god Mercury.

Following four years of meticulous conservation and research in the J. Paul Getty Museum’s Antiquities Conservation Department, the exhibition Ancient Luxury and the Roman Silver Treasure from Berthouville, on view at the Getty Villa November 19, 2014, to August 17, 2015, will present this unique collection of ancient silver in its full splendor and offer new insights about ancient art, technology, religion, and cultural interaction. Read the rest of this entry »


Pirate News: Archaeologists Pull 5 Of Blackbeard’s Cannons From The Sea

Capture of the Pirate, Blackbeard, 1718 Jean Leon Gerome Ferris

Capture of the Pirate, Blackbeard, 1718 Jean Leon Gerome Ferris

Until today, this cannon hadn’t seen air for 295 years.

CannonOne-1

In 1718, legendary Caribbean pirate Blackbeard sank his ship, Queen Anne’s Revenge, after it got stuck on too-shallow land outside the coastal city of Beaufort, N.C. For almost three centuries, the ship’s hodgepodge of cannons from around the world has sat at the bottom of the sea. Today several of Blackbeard’s big guns rose to the surface in the largest cannon catch yet from the site.

Led by North Carolina’s Department of Cultural Resources, today’s cannon recovery is the latest development in an archeological endeavor scheduled to conclude in 2014. The wreck, recorded at least as early as July 12th, 1718, was discovered on the ocean floor in 1996. Since then, archeologists have recoveredtens of thousands of artifacts. A museum dedicated to the wreck offers this fun interactive map of the ship on the ocean floor.

Read the rest of this entry »