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Race-Obsessed Social Justice Warriors Target Director Tim Burton, Director Flips Bird

 reports: For fans of Ransom Riggs‘ 2011 bestseller Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children, one of the things that made the news of its big-screen adaptation so intriguing was imagining which actors would make up the ensemble. The book features a large cast of characters, from the eponymous children to the many adults who throw them into peril.

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Source: Jamie McCarthy/Getty Images Entertainment/Getty Images

“Nowadays, people are talking about it more,” he says regarding film diversity. But “things either call for things, or they don’t. I remember back when I was a child watching The Brady Bunch and they started to get all politically correct. Like, OK, let’s have an Asian child and a black. I used to get more offended by that than just… I grew up watching blaxploitation movies, right? And I said, that’s great. I didn’t go like, OK, there should be more white people in these movies.”

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“I had to go back in my head and go, ‘how many black characters have been in Tim Burton movies?’ And I may have been the first, I don’t know, or the most prominent in that particular way, but it happens the way it happens. I don’t think it’s any fault of his or his method of storytelling, it’s just how it’s played out. Tim’s a really great guy.”

— Samuel L. Jackson

Of the film’s entire cast, Jackson appears to be the only nonwhite character, playing the villainous Barron, the leader of a group of creatures who aim to murder children with supernatural abilities. When I ask Jackson about the film’s lack of diversity, he says that while he “noticed it,” it didn’t deter him from taking on his part. Read the rest of this entry »

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