[PHOTO] Meet Me at the Beer Machine

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This Day in History, January 30th, 1948: Mohandas Gandhi Assassinated

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Gandhi was assassinated on this day in 1948, a shocking and dispiriting event covered by media all across the world, including a mournful Nation. But perhaps more interesting to read today is this article from our issue of May 6, 1897, “East Indians in South Africa,” written by Alfred Webb, an Irish MP and an early president of the Indian National Congress.

Mahatma Gandhi, lying in state, after his assassinatino in 1948. Photo via Wikimedia Commons.

Mahatma Gandhi, lying in state, after his assassinatino in 1948. Photo via Wikimedia Commons.

According to the historian Ramachandra Guha, this is the first mention of Gandhi ever to appear in the American press.

The population of India increases rapidly and encroaches upon the means of subsistence. South Africa is the nearest outlet for emigration. The climate is congenial; and thither numbers of Indians have repaired…. While all were at first welcomed as helpful toward the development of the country, all alike have been subjected to disabilities by color prejudice and by law…. M.K. Gandhi, a Hindu barrister, long resident in South Africa, returned to India to arouse public interest in the subject. His address at Bombay, last September, has been published…Mr. Gandhi says: “The general feeling throughout South Africa is that of hatred towards the Indians, encouraged by the newspapers and connived at, even countenanced, by the legislators…(read more)

January 30, 1948

The Nation


Makers of Bud Light Buying Seattle-Based Craft Brewer Elysian Brewing Co.

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Q13 FOX News

SEATTLE — Anheuser-Busch says it is buying Seattle-based craft brewer Elysian Brewing Co. for an undisclosed sum.

It is the latest in a string of craft brewery acquisitions by Anheuser-Busch as it tries to counter soft sales of its own brands, such as Budweiser.

Anheuser-Busch and Elysian announced the deal Friday and said it will bring the brewer’s popular beers — most notably Immortal IPA — to a larger audience. The deal includes Elysian’s brewery business and its four Seattle brewpubs. It is expected to close by the end of the first quarter.

Anheuser-Busch is the U.S. arm of Anheuser-Busch InBev SA, which is based in Belgium and is the world’s largest brewer.

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Danger Bullets: Chocolate-Covered Tabasco-Flavored Jelly Beans Available to Consumers, No FBI Background Check Required

Assorted flavors of jelly beans wait to be packaged at the Jelly Belly Candy Co. manufacturing facility in Fairfield, California. Ken James / Bloomberg / Getty Images

Assorted flavors of jelly beans wait to be packaged at the Jelly Belly Candy Co. manufacturing facility in Fairfield, California. Ken James / Bloomberg / Getty Images

ATF & FDA Approved Weaponized Candy

Just think: We’ll no longer have to sit down to a bowl of jelly beans served with the customary bottle of Tabasco on the side. Now these two great flavors are finally combined.

Samantha Grossman reports:

Gone are the days of creative but traditional jelly bean flavors like toasted marshmallow, cotton candy, and cream soda. Jelly Belly is rolling out two new, decidedly risky flavors: draft beer (yes!) and chocolate-covered Tabasco (hm).

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An Old-Fashioned Thanksgiving Feast

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Non-Alcoholic Beer Inventor Unveils New Non-Adhesive Glue

ST. LOUIS–Hot on the heels of his successful line of non-curative medicines, non-alcoholic-beer inventor Thomas O’Doul unveiled “Elmer’s Slick,” a glue that looks and feels like ordinary white glue but has no adhesive properties. “Say goodbye to your fingers getting all stuck together, just because you want to glue things,” O’Doul said at a press conference Monday. “With Elmer’s Slick, you can enjoy gluing without all the messy adhesiveness.” O’Doul said he next plans to develop a flame-retardant gasoline and the world’s first gelatinous construction lumber.

America’s Finest News Source


Pig drinks 18 beers, tries to fight cow before passing out

A wild boar in Australia caused a ruckus in a campsite when the swine stole and drank 18 beers from a camper. The pig then got the drunk munchies and rooted around various campsites for food, the Metro reports. The pig apparently then decided to pick a fight with a nearby cow, however the fight didn’t turn out the way he probably imagined it would. Read the rest of this entry »


Beer by Beer, Houston Home Morphs Into Landmark

By RAMIT PLUSHNICK-MASTI Associated Press
HOUSTON July 29, 2013 (AP)

A child of the Great Depression, John Milkovisch didn’t throw anything away — not even the empty cans of beer he enjoyed each afternoon with his wife.

So, in the early 1970s when aluminum siding on houses was all the rage, he lugged down the cans he had stored in his attic for years, painstakingly cut open and flattened each one and began to wallpaper his home.

“The funny thing is that it wasn’t … to attract attention,” said Ruben Guevara, head of restoration and preservation of the Beer Can House in Houston’s Memorial Park area. “He said himself that if there was a house similar to this a block away, he wouldn’t take the time to go look at it. He had no idea what was the fascination about what he was doing.”

Milkovisch passed away in the mid-1980s, but his wife, Mary, still lived there. Her sons would do work from time to time, replacing rusty steel cans with new ones and restoring a hurricane-destroyed beer wall. And when they feared for her safety because of the gawkers, they put up a privacy fence, embedding beer cans in that as well.

The neighborhood has rapidly transformed since Mary Milkovisch’s death in the mid-1990s, going from a working middle-class area to today’s condo- and loft-lined upper-class sector. But the home remains a well-known entity.

Determined to preserve this accidental piece of folk art, local nonprofit Orange Show Center for Visionary Art bought the property about 10 years ago, began a careful restoration of the house and opened it to the public.

“It shows the human nature of the individual is supreme. You can take the simplest thing, and it can actually affect a lot of other people,” said Houston resident Patrick Louque, who lived in the area when it was John Milkovisch’s pet project. “It’s totally grabbed me, and it’s probably totally grabbed the imagination of more people than I could possibly imagine.”

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