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[VIDEO] How Many iPhones Does It Take To Stop an AK-74 Bullet?

Source: TruthNation

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OH YES HE DID: East Texas Man Shoots Armadillo, Gets Hit in Face by Bullet Ricochet

armadillo-defense

Man airlifted to a nearby hospital, jaw wired shut

DALLAS (Reuters) – Lisa Maria Garza reports: An East Texas man was wounded after he fired a gun at an armadillo in his yard and the bullet ricocheted back to hit him in his face, the county sheriff said on Friday.

Cass County Sheriff Larry Rowe said the man, who was not identified, went outside his home in Marietta, southwest of Texarkana, at around 3 a.m. on Thursday morning. He spotted the armadillo on his property and opened fire.

Mr-Crab

“Big deal. I’ve been shot at least five times”

“We didn’t find the armadillo.”

— Cass County Sheriff Larry Rowe

“His wife was in the house. He went outside and took his .38 revolver and shot three times at the armadillo,” Rowe said.

The animal’s hard shell deflected at least one of three bullets, which then struck the man’s jaw, he said. Read the rest of this entry »


OH YES THEY DID: U.S. Military Develops Self-Guided ‘Smart Bullet’

Videos supplied by DARPA show the bullets making sharp turns in midair as they pursue their targets

(CNN) Don Melvin writes: You know the phrase “dodging a bullet”? Forget about it. Probably not going to happen anymore.

The U.S. military said this week it has made great progress in its effort to develop a self-steering bullet.

DARPA-smart-bullet

“True to DARPA’s mission, EXACTO has demonstrated what was once thought impossible: the continuous guidance of a small-caliber bullet to target.”

— Jerome Dunn, DARPA program manager

In February, the “smart bullets” — .50-caliber projectiles equipped with optical sensors — passed their most successful round of live-fire tests to date, according to the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, or DARPA.

In the tests, an experienced marksman “repeatedly hit moving and evading targets,” a DARPA statement said.

smart-bullet-graph

“This live-fire demonstration from a standard rifle showed that EXACTO is able to hit moving and evading targets with extreme accuracy at sniper ranges unachievable with traditional rounds.”

“Additionally,” the statement said, “a novice shooter using the system for the first time hit a moving target.” In other words, now you don’t even have to be a good shot to hit the mark.

The system has been developed by DARPA’s Extreme Accuracy Tasked Ordnance program, known as EXACTO.

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“Fitting EXACTO’s guidance capabilities into a small .50-caliber size is a major breakthrough and opens the door to what could be possible in future guided projectiles across all calibers.”

“True to DARPA’s mission, EXACTO has demonstrated what was once thought impossible: the continuous guidance of a small-caliber bullet to target,” said Jerome Dunn, DARPA program manager. Read the rest of this entry »


[PHOTO] NO FIREARMS ALLOWED: Objection Noted!

No-Firearms


Homeland Security Still Feeling Insecure

110214ammo

Solution: Purchasing an Additional 141,160 rounds of Hornady Sniper Ammo Helps Ease Insecure Feelings, Inspires Trust, and Promotes Domestic Tranquility

Note: it’s not just DHS that’s stockpiling and doing massive ammo purchases. The U.S. Department of Education (what?) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration are stockpiling ammo. Question: Why does N.O.A.A., and the Department of Education need to stockpile tons of hollow point bullets?

The Department of Homeland Security is buying more bullets with a solicitation for over 141,00 rounds of sniper ammunition.  According to a solicitation posted on FedBizOpps, the federal agency is looking to procure 141,160 rounds of Hornady .308 Winchester 168gr A-MAX TAP ammunition. Such ammunition is sometimes retailed as “Zombie Max,” a marketing gimmick alluding to its power. “What makes the .308 ammunition so deadly is the long range capability of the round,” notes James Smith. “The ability is called ballistic coefficient, or the efficiency of a projectile in overcoming air resistance as it travels to its target.

Read the rest of this entry »


Concealed Carry: What About +P Ammo?

Plus-P-Ammo-e1383858871357Gun Digest‘s Grant Cunningham writes:  The idea behind the +P is to add enough energy to reliably deliver an expanded bullet deep enough to do its job. It doesn’t have to be a lot of extra energy – it just has to be enough. Here’s what you need to know.

What About +P Ammo?

Remember that hollowpoints use part of their energy to expand their diameter, but the energy that’s used to expand the bullet is energy that can’t be used to drive the same bullet forward. There is no such thing as a free lunch; if you want the bullet to expand, it’s going to use energy. If there is too little of it to start with, there won’t be enough left to carry the bullet on its path.

Read the rest of this entry »


Ambitious Military Techno-Failures: Top 10 Amazing Weapons That Never Made It

From Popular Mechanics, don’t miss 10 Weapons That Never Made It, with photos of super-cool failures. Below are two of my favorites. The Rocket-Bullet? How can you not want a Rocket Bullet?

Erik Schechter reports: Making a list of failed weapons systems, the temptation is to trot out the infamous ice-and-sawdust ship, the giant tricycle tank, or some other ridiculous doohickey. But the world of military programs is not neatly divided between the sublime and the stupid. There are a lot in-between cases.

never-weapons-01-1013-lgn-1Flying Platforms

Developed by Hiller Helicopters in the 1950s, the VZ-1 Pawnee was a one-person flying platform kept aloft by two rotors housed in a duct, allowing a single soldier to fire from the air. The vehicle lacked fixed wings or a tail rotor, so if the pilot wanted to bank to the left or right, he had to do so by shifting his body weight. (Think Marty McFly’s hoverboard in Back to the Future Part II.) Although it performed well during tests, the U.S. Army never deployed the VZ-1 Pawnee because it considered the craft too slow, too small, and too delicate for combat. Nowadays, the concept lives on in quirky recreational vehicles.

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Rocket-Bullets

In the 1960s, MB Associates developed the Gyrojet, a family of experimental guns that fired tiny rockets instead of bullets and did so in near silence. Despite making a cameo in the James Bond movie You Only Live Twice, though, the Gyrojet ran into plenty of problems. The rocket-bullet picked up speed only once it left the barrel, so the gun was useless at close range. It also jammed frequently and was not very accurate.

Nevertheless, alternatives to the conventional bullet still pop up now and again. Just last year, Sandia National Laboratories researchers developed a laser-guided, dart-like bullet that can hit a bull’s-eye a mile away.

 

Read more: 10 Weapons That Never Made It – Popular Mechanics