Carrie Fisher’s Autopsy Reveals Cocktail of Drugs, Including Cocaine, Opiates and Ecstasy 

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Carrie Fisher had a drug cocktail in her system when she died in late December after going into cardiac arrest aboard an LAX-bound flight.

A Los Angeles County coroner’s report released on Monday revealed a mixture of drugs that were in actress Carrie Fisher’s system when she went into cardiac arrest on an L.A.-bound flight and later died.

Fisher’s toxicology review found evidence of cocaine, methadone, MDMA (better known as ecstasy), alcohol and opiates when she was rushed to Ronald Reagan UCLA Hospital on Dec. 23, a toxicology report showed.

The test results “suggests there was an exposure to heroin, but that the dose and time of exposure cannot be pinpointed.” Therefore we cannot establish the significance of heroin regarding the cause of death in this case.”

The tests revealed that the cocaine would have been consumed within the previous 72 hours, according to the autopsy.

Four days later on Dec. 27, Fisher went into cardiac arrest. After 90 minutes of attempting to revive her, officials declared the “Star Wars” actress dead just before 9 a.m.

Her cause of death was listed as sleep apnea with other factors.

In addition to the listed cause of death, the coroner’s statement cited “other conditions: atherosclerotic heart disease, drug use.”

It also said: “How Injury Occurred: Multiple drug intake, significance not ascertained.”

At family’s request, medical examiners did not dissect the corpse. Instead, they conducted CT scans of the body. Read the rest of this entry »


[VIDEO] The Dick Van Dyke Show: ‘You Wonderful You’, Mary Tyler Moore

Oh How We Met on that Night We Danced- Rob cons his way into dancing with Laura so he could meet her and talk to her. Things don’t go exactly as planned. The Dick Van Dyke Show is an American television sitcom that initially aired on CBS from October 3, 1961, until June 1, 1966. The show was created by Carl Reiner and starred Dick Van Dyke, Rose Marie, Morey Amsterdam, Larry Mathews, and Mary Tyler Moore. It centered on the work and home life of television comedy writer Rob Petrie (Van Dyke). The show was produced by Reiner with Bill Persky and Sam Denoff. The music for the show’s theme song was written by Earle Hagen.[1]

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The series won 15 Emmy Awards. In 1997, the episodes “Coast-to-Coast Big Mouth” and “It May Look Like a Walnut” were ranked at 8 and 15 respectively on TV Guide’s 100 Greatest Episodes of All Time.[2] In 2002, it was ranked at 13 on TV Guide’s 50 Greatest TV Shows of All Time[3] and in 2013, it was ranked at 20 on their list of the 60 Best Series. Read the rest of this entry »


Mary Tyler Moore: 1936 – 2017

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Television great Mary Tyler Moore, the beloved star of “The Dick Van Dyke Show” and “The Mary Tyler Moore Show,” died Wednesday in Connecticut. She was 80. The Associated Press confirmed her death.

The vivacious brunette performer transformed the image of women on television first as Van Dyke’s sexy, vulnerable wife Laura Petrie and then as single career girl Mary Richards in her own series. Her work in the two series brought Moore five Emmy Awards, in 1965, 1966, 1973, 1974 and 1976. She won another Emmy for 1993 TV special “Stolen Babies.”

Moore was also a powerhouse producer via her MTM production company with then-husband Grant Tinker, producing her own series as well as “The Bob Newhart Show” and spinoff series “Rhoda” and “Lou Grant,” among others.

Photo by CBS Photo Archive/Getty

Photo by CBS Photo Archive/Getty

She combined wholesomeness and sex appeal with cracker-jack comedic timing. In many ways Moore was a throwback to Hollywood golden era leading ladies like Myrna Loy and Jean Arthur, but with a decidedly updated twist.

Her role as Laura Petrie, the suburban wife of comedy writer Rob Petrie, also represented a step forward for the portrayal of women on television. Though they maintained separate beds, the Petries otherwise shared an active, romantic marital life. And unlike Desi Arnaz on “I Love Lucy,” Van Dyke’s character was not threatened by his wife’s talents or her intelligence.

The series made Moore a star, and she worked on films under contract at Universal. With the exception of “Thoroughly Modern Millie,” in which she played third fiddle to Julie Andrews and the scene-stealing Carol Channing, the studio’s attempts to fashion her in the Doris Day mold was unsuccessful. Moore also tried her hand at the Broadway stage, co-starring with Richard Chamberlain in David Merrick’s musical version of Truman Capote’s “Breakfast at Tiffany’s.” Read the rest of this entry »


[VIDEO] ‘Singin’ in the Rain’ Returning to Theaters This Month

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Just weeks after Debbie Reynolds’ death at age 84, the legendary entertainer’s most famous movie is dancing back onto the silver screen for a limited engagement. Singin’ in the Rain will screen Sunday, Jan. 15, and Wednesday, Jan. 18, in theaters nationwide as the first film in this year’s TCM Big Screen Classics series.

Reynolds landed her breakout role in the 1952 musical, playing a budding actress caught up in Hollywood’s transition from the silent era to the talkies. Though she had no dancing experience at the time, then-18-year-old Reynolds held her own with the likes of Gene Kelly and Donald O’Connor in numbers like “Good Morning” and “You Were Meant for Me.”

In her 1988 biography, Debbie, she wrote that “Singin’ in the Rain and childbirth were the hardest things I ever had to do in my life.” Read the rest of this entry »


[VIDEO] ‘Mother’: Director Albert Brooks Remembers Debbie Reynolds

Albert Brooks, who cast Debbie Reynolds in the title role of his 1996 comedy Mother, reacted on Twitter to the death of the 84-year-old actress, which came just one day after the untimely passing of her daughter Carrie Fisher.

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Mother marked Reynolds’s first major screen role in decades. Brooks, who wanted to cast an icon of 1950s cinema in the part, enlisted Fisher’s help to persuade her mother to play his. The role landed Reynolds her fifth Golden Globe nomination(read more)

mother Read the rest of this entry »


Debbie Reynolds Has Died

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Debbie Reynolds has died after suffering a stroke at her son’s home in Beverly Hills.

Debbie Reynolds — who rose to stardom in “Singin’ in the Rain” and quickly became a staple among Hollywood royalty — died Wednesday as a result of a stroke, TMZ has learned … just one day after her daughter Carrie Fisher passed away … this according to her son Todd.

Debbie was rushed to a hospital shortly after 1 PM when someone at the Beverly Hills home of her son, Todd, called 911 to report a possible stroke. We’re told Debbie and Todd were making funeral plans for Carrie, who died Tuesday of cardiac arrest.

Debbie famously divorced Eddie Fisher in 1959 after his affair with Elizabeth Taylor. Debbie married 2 more times in 1960 and 1984.

She played iconic roles in “Tammy and the Bachelor” and “The Unsinkable Molly Brown” … for which she earned an Oscar nomination. Read the rest of this entry »


Report: Carrie Fisher Suffers Heart Attack on Plane

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Police were radioed for help around 1 p.m.

Ryan Parker reports: Carrie Fisher reportedly suffered a heart attack on a plane Friday, according to TMZ.

Airport police confirmed to The Hollywood Reporter units were responding to someone with a medical emergency on a plane, but they could not identify the victim, officer Alicia Hernandez said.

Police were radioed for help around 1 p.m. she said.

A rep did not immediately respond to THR‘s request for comment. Read the rest of this entry »


How VR Has the Power To Make You Care

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Thanksgiving Weekend Primatologist Browser Tabocalpyse

Across The Line‘ is the latest example of VR attempting to evoke empathy.

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Alice Bonasio

Alice Bonasio writes: There’s an iconic scene in Blade Runner where Harrison Ford’s character Deckard meets the replicant Rachel for the first time, but he doesn’t know she’s not human. He then uses a test called Voight-Kampff  to determine whether or not she’s a real person. The test consists of a series of questions designed to elicit emotion. The idea – which is beautifully challenged later on in the film – is that machines are incapable of such empathetic responses.

Empathy, in other words, is what makes us human.

With an emerging consensus that the immersive nature of VR is particularly effective in triggering those empathetic responses, we’re seeing artists throughout the creative industries exploring new possibilities for storytelling – with a purpose. Chris Milk’s UN-Commissioned Clouds Over Sidra showed the plight of refugees through the eyes of a 12-year old Syrian girl, while the National Theatre’s Immersive Storytelling Studio production HOME/AAMIR transported viewers to the infamous Calais ‘Jungle’ camp.

VR can even make people feel more empathetic toward more abstract things like the environment, as was recently shown with the Crystal Reef project – showcased this year at the Tribeca Film Festival by researchers from the Virtual Human Interaction Lab (VHIL) at Stanford. The simulation, where you watched the devastating effects of ocean acidification caused by man, served to connect people to the consequences of their own actions in a much more tangible way.

[Read the full story here, at uploadvr.com]

Journalist and Filmmaker Nonny de la Peña – Co-Founder of the Emblematic Group and affectionately known as the “Godmother of VR” – has long explored the power of Virtual Reality experiences to break through viewer apathy. Her pioneering work often transports viewers into uncomfortable situations – such as a line for food handouts outside a shelter in LA, where you see a man collapsing from hunger next to you – and makes them re-think their outlook on often controversial issues.

The latest of those projects is Across The Line, an experience which tells the story of a young woman going to an abortion clinic. I viewed it recently at London’s Raindance Film Festival – where it was selected for this year’s VR showcase Arcade – and spoke to la Peña and their partners at the Planned Parenthood Federation of America (PPFA) to find out more about how the project developed and what the reaction to it has been like so far. Read the rest of this entry »