[VIDEO] ‘All I Want For Christmas is a Goat’: Choir of Goats Sing Classic Christmas Carols

The Swedish branch of ActionAid, an international charity working to fight poverty and further human rights, just released an album entitled “All I Want For Christmas is a Goat.” It’s one of the funniest things we’ve heard all year.

A cacophanous choir of goats sing eight classic Christmas carols including “Jingle Bells”:

Source: Archie McPhee’s


Bring Back the Serialized Novel

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Hillary Kelly writesIn 1847, an English cleaning woman was extremely excited to learn that the boy lodging in her employer’s house was “the son of the man that put together Dombey” — that is, the son of Charles Dickens. The woman could neither read nor write, but she lived above a snuff shop where, on the first Monday of every month, a community of friends would gather to read aloud the latest installment of “Dombey and Son, which had begun serialization on Oct. 1, 1846. By that time, the monthly installments of Dickens’s novels — which started with The Pickwick Papers in 1836 — were such a staple of British culture that an illiterate woman with no access to the actual book knew the author’s work intimately.

“…the publishing industry is in the doldrums, yet the novel shows few signs of digging into its past and resurrecting the techniques that drove fans wild and juiced sales figures. The novel is now decidedly a single object, a mass entity packaged and moved as a whole.”

More than 150 years later, the publishing industry is in the doldrums, yet the novel shows few signs of digging into its past and resurrecting the techniques that drove fans wild and juiced sales figures. The novel is now decidedly a single object, a mass entity packaged and moved as a whole. That’s not, of course, a bad thing, but it does create a barrier to entry that the publishing world can’t seem to overcome. Meanwhile, consumers gladly gobble up other media in segments — whether it’s a “Walking Dead” episode, a series of Karl Ove Knausgaard ’s travelogues or a public-radio show (it’s called “Serial” for a reason, people) — so there’s reason to believe they would do the same with fiction. What the novel needs again is tension. And the best source for that tension is serialization.

“Since the loss of compelling plot is one of the things that readers most often complain of in the modern novel. it might be a salutary discipline for novelists to have to go back to Dickens, or even James, to learn how it’s done.”

— Critic Adam Kirsch

“The Pickwick Papers” wasn’t the original serialized novel — the format had existed for at least a century prior — but it was the work that truly popularized the form. The first installment had a print order of 1,000 copies; by the time the final entry was published, circulation had reached 40,000. Buoyed by the success of “Pickwick,” Dickens serialized his work for the rest of his career, and scores of other notable Victorian novelists joined the publishing craze. William Makepeace Thackeray’s “Vanity Fair, Wilkie Collins’s The Woman in White and Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes stories all emerged as serials.

[Read the full text here, at The Washington Post]

Old and new magazines, such as Blackwood’s and Household Words, competed for established and emerging voices. The constant influx of unresolved plots and elliptical section breaks stoked a fervor for fiction in Victorian England. It wasn’t until book production became cheap and easy, and new mediums such as radio arose to fill leisure time, that serialization slowly shriveled away.

“In many ways, the novel is already designed to be delivered in serial form: Chapters and section breaks bring full stops to the narrative, while flashbacks and shifts in perspective and narration create time and space for momentum to build.”

Why can’t the same techniques that once galvanized readers be revived? Today, when a novel is released, it relies on a series of tried (but not always true) advertising methods. The book is accompanied by a simplified synopsis targeting a specific audience, inflated with blurbs from “influencers” and dropped onto reviewers’ desks with the hope that enough serious critics will praise it that it will wriggle onto a prize list. Even greatness doesn’t always guarantee success. As the Telegraph noted in its look at “Why great novels don’t get noticed now ,” Samantha Harvey’s “Dear Thief” received universally glowing reviews — and sold only 1,000 copies in six months. Publishing houses have a brief window to push a work into the public’s consciousness. If the pilot doesn’t light, the novel doesn’t move. But with a constant stream of exposure over a period of six or 12 or 18 months, a novel would stand a far better chance of piquing the public’s interest. Read the rest of this entry »


Progressives take lessons from ‘Downton Abbey’

(Photo by Robin Marchant/WireImage)

(Photo by Robin Marchant/WireImage)

George Will  writes:  Many “Downton Abbey” watchers are nostalgia gluttons who grieved when Lord Grantham lost his fortune in Canadian railroad shares. There are, however, a discerning few whose admirable American sensibilities caused them to rejoice at Grantham’s loss: “Now perhaps this amiable but dilettantish toff will get off his duff and get a job.”

“It is fitting that PBS offers “Downton Abbey” to its disproportionately progressive audience. This series is a languid appreciation of a class structure supposedly tempered by the paternalism of the privileged. And if progressivism prevails, the United States will be Downton Abbey: Upstairs, the administrators of the regulatory state will, with a feudal sense of noblesse oblige, assume responsibility for the lower orders downstairs, gently protecting them…”

This drama’s verisimilitude extends to emphasizing that his lordship had a fortune to squander only because he married an American heiress. By battening on what they disdained, this republic’s commercial culture, many British aristocrats could live beyond their inherited means — actual work being, of course, unthinkable.

The deserved decline of Downton’s finances demonstrates why estate taxes are unnecessary: Even when Balzac’s axiom is accurate (“At the bottom of every great fortune without apparent source, there’s always some crime”) and fortunes are ill-gotten, subsequent generations often soon fritter them away. Call this Darwinian redistribution.

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Scenes of Privation out of Charles Dickens Haunt Us Today

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WASHINGTON — Donald Lambro writes:   In Charles Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol,” there is a heart-wrenching scene of the struggling Cratchit family’s meager meal that included a small goose and a tiny plum pudding.

The family is barely scraping by on the minuscule wages paid by the miserly Ebenezer Scrooge. Dickens describes “one small atom of a bone upon the dish” that remained on the table, followed by a “speckled cannon-ball” of blazing pudding with a sprig of holly stuck on top that ended the skimpy Christmas Eve dinner.

“But nobody said or thought it was at all a small pudding for a large family. It would have been flat heresy to do so,” Dickens observes.

Such was the daily life of want and hunger among the poor population in 18th-century London. With so many mouths to feed, Mrs. Cratchit managed to stretch what little they had to eat with a few potatoes and some applesauce.

Here in the world’s wealthiest country, some may think that such bleak circumstances are long since past or very rare. But they’re not. Millions of our fellow citizens are still struggling to feed themselves and their families.

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Rickets Making a Comeback in the U.K., Doctors Say

300px-Rickets_USNLMMaria Cheng reports:  (LONDON) — Rickets, the childhood disease that once caused an epidemic of bowed legs and curved spines during the Victorian era, is making a shocking comeback in 21st-century Britain.

Rickets results from a severe deficiency of vitamin D, which helps the body absorb calcium. Rickets was historically considered to be a disease of poverty among children who toiled in factories during the Industrial Revolution, and some experts have hypothesized it afflicted literary characters like Tiny Tim in Charles Dickens‘ “A Christmas Carol.”

Last month, Britain’s chief medical officer, Dr. Sally Davies, described the return of rickets as “appalling.” She proposed the country give free vitamins to all children under 5 and asked the country’s independent health watchdog to study if that would be worthwhile.

More… TIME.com