China’s Chili-Eating Competition

 


More: Burger King Japan’s Burgers of Color

burger-red

The red buns are colored with tomato powder. The cheese is also made with tomato powder to turn it red. The sauce is also red. It’s based on miso paste mixed with Chinese chili bean sauce and red pepper

Kazuaki Nagata reports: Burger King Japan surprised the public when it released its black burger series in 2012. Now the fast-food chain has announced a similarly colorful promotion involving red sandwiches.

Just as the black burger series had dark black buns and cheese, the new red burgers come with red buns and cheese.

Tokyo-based Burger King Japan said it will sell two types of seasonal red burger starting July 3. One is called “Aka Samurai Chicken” that sandwiches fried chicken, lettuce, tomato and cheese between red buns colored with tomato powder. Read the rest of this entry »


[VIDEO] Courage: Danish National Chamber Orchestra Performing Under the Influence of Murderously Hot Chili Peppers

Members of the Danish National Chamber Orchestra playing Tango Jalousie while eating the worlds hottest chili peppers. The orchestra is conducted by Chili Klaus – a Danish Chili Pepper enthusiast.
Unfortunately The Danish National Chamber Orchestra closes by the end of 2014.
Chili Klaus on facebook

http://www.chiliklaus.dk


Fire-Eaters: The Search for the Hottest Chili

131104_r24188_p233

Lauren Collins writes:  In mid-December of 2011, Brady Bennett went out drinking at Adobe Gila’s at the Greene, a Mexican restaurant in Dayton, Ohio. After two beers, the bartender offered him a free shot. Bennett chose Patrón tequila with apple schnapps. Soon, he recalled, his throat began to swell. He struggled to breathe, and his nose, mouth, and lungs “felt as though they were on fire.” He called for an ambulance, moaning, and was taken to the hospital. A year later, Bennett filed a lawsuit against Adobe Gila’s, claiming that the bartender had spiked his drink with extract of the bhut jolokia, or ghost chili. (Adobe Gila’s denies the allegations.) “It wasn’t as if they gave him a little Tabasco,” Jeff McQuiston, Bennett’s lawyer, told the DaytonDaily News. “This stuff is lethal.” The bhut jolokia is a hundred and fifty times hotter than a jalapeño. Gastromasochists have likened it to molten lava, burning needles, and “the tip of my tongue being branded by a fine point of heated steel.” Yet, at more than a million Scoville heat units—the Scoville scale, developed by the pharmacist Wilbur Scoville in 1912, measures the pungency of foods—the bhut jolokia is at least 462,400 SHU short of being the world’s hottest chili pepper.

Read the rest of this entry »


Contemplating the Ghost

Contemplating the Ghost Chile

Happy Halloween! I’ve eaten and cooked with various kinds of dangerously hot peppers before, but have yet to encounter the Ghost Pepper ভূত জলকীয়া) (Bhot Jolokia) fresh or preserved, though I’ve been curious to try it. I discovered this at an Asian market last week, and immediately bought it.

I’m looking for ideas, recipes to try. Help me take advantage of the Ghost’s legendary heat! I welcome instructions from any chefs out there. Any suggestions?

From friedas.com:

Also known the Bhut Jolokia or Naga Jolokia, the Ghost Chile originates in India and is considered one of the hottest commercially available chiles in the world. (At this time, only the Trinidad Scorpion Chile is hotter.) Frieda’s Dried Ghost Chiles are twice as hot as Dried Habanero Chiles, and should be used sparingly in recipes. CAUTION: Wear gloves and use caution when handling this chile, and do not touch eyes, nose or mouth after handling.


The Gut-Wrenching Science Behind the World’s Hottest Peppers

Chiliheads crave the heat that hurts so good, but nothing compares to the legendary superhot that spices life in remote India

By Mary Roach

The 17 tribes of Nagaland are united, historically, by an enthusiasm for heads. The Nagas: Hill Peoples of Northeast India—my reading matter on the two-hour drive from Dimapur to Kohima, in the state of Nagaland —contains dozens of references to head-taking but only one mention of the item that has brought me here: the Naga King Chili (a.k.a. Bhut Jolokia), often ranked the world’s hottest. “In the Chang village of Hakchang,” the anthropologist J. H. Hutton is quoted as saying in 1922, “…women whose blood relations on the male side have taken a head may cook the head, with chilies, to get the flesh off.” Hutton’s use of “cook” would seem to be a reference to Chang culinary practice. Only on rereading did I realize the Chang weren’t eating the chilies—or the flesh, for that matter—but using them to clean the skull.

Such is the perplexing contradiction of the genus Capsicum: condiment and industrial solvent, pleasure and pain. I’ve come to Nagaland to confront the conundrum on its home turf at the annual all-tribe get-together, the Hornbill Festival, which includes a Naga King Chili-Eating Competition.

The last known head-taking raid occurred sometime in the last century. (The verb “taking” is preferred over hunting. You do not hunt heads. You hunt people and then take their heads.) Most Nagas are Baptists now. Nonetheless, they appear to have pride in their gruesome heritage. A crossbeam on the front of the Chang exhibit building on the festival grounds is decorated with a row of cephalic bas-reliefs; lest anyone mistake them for family portraiture, the neck stalks drip red.

Men in loincloths stand outside on a break from rehearsing a warrior dance. I hold out a Bhut Jolokia I’ve been carrying in my jacket like a concealed weapon. I want to see who’s tough enough. Only one man steps closer. He points to the chili and uses an English word all Chang men know. “One of the enemy!”

It’s a sensible assessment. The chili pepper does not want to be your friend. It wants to hurt you so badly you turn it loose. Plants cannot bare teeth or run for the hills; they must protect themselves passively. Some are horribly bitter. Others, less forgiving, are poisonous. Capsaicin, the primary active ingredient in hot peppers, falls into the category of irritant, but that’s an insult to its power. (Chemical irritation, or chemical feel, is the third of the chemical senses, along with smell and taste.) Capsaicin in the eyes or airways is disabling to the extent that it is used as a nonlethal weapon—pepper spray. Bhut Jolokia grenades were developed several years ago by India’s Defence Research and Development Organization and used on protesters in Kashmir. (The grenades were shelved because the chili powder is prone to fungal rot.) Both the eyes and the airways are extremely sensitive, far more so than the skin or tongue. This is normally—outside of protests and riots—a good thing, because seeing and breathing are crucial to survival; the sensitivity of these organs and tissues motivates their owner to keep them safe.

Less immediate but no less excruciating are the effects on the digestive tract. As I’m about to see.

Read the rest of this entry »