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[VIDEO] Daffy Doc: ‘Going Crazy’, 1938

The Daffy Doc is a 1938 animated short subject directed by Bob Clampett starring Daffy Duck and featuring Porky Pig.

Plot: In this short feature by Bob Clampett, the story takes place at the Stitch in Time Hospital where their motto is “As ye sew so shall ye rip!” In the operating room Dr. Quack, assisted by Dr. Daffy Duck (“also a quack”) is about to perform surgery. As the operation starts and Dr. Quack asks for his instruments in an increasing rate, Daffy goes berserk and jumps around the room, tossing the instruments in the air and using the air bag as a punching bag.

daffy-doc

He is then ejected from the room and ends up stuck in an iron lung. He fights his way out of it, but his body begins to inflate and deflate several times. Humiliated, Daffy insists that he will not take this lying down and states that he will soon get his own patient. Daffy opens the window and sees Porky Pig strolling by the hospital. Seeing his big chance, Daffy follows Porky around the corner and knocks him out with his mallet then carries him inside on a stretcher. Inside a hospital room, Daffy is examining Porky by checking his heartbeat with a ratty stethoscope and his temperature with a thermometer, which turn out to be a lollipop. Read the rest of this entry »

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[VIDEO] ‘A Wild Hare’, 1940: Happy Birthday, Wabbit! Bugs Bunny Turns 75 Years Old

The world’s favorite cartoon rabbit is 75 years old today. Bugs Bunny made his first appearance in 1940 in the theatrical short “A Wild Hare.” CBSN’s Elaine Quijano shows us how his catch line, “What’s up doc?” has stuck ever since.

bugs

At WSJ, Mike Ayers writes:

 Bugs is being hunted down by Elmer Fudd, a dance the two would engage in for many years to come. In the first appearance, Bugs’s voice is a bit deeper, but his penchant for trickery at Elmer’s expense is immediate.

Watch the cartoon above.

Fun fact about “A Wild Hare”: In 1940, it received an Academy Award nomination for Best Original Short, but lost to “The Milky Way.”

On “Looney Tunes” animator Chuck Jones’s Facebook page, a note about “Wild Hare” director Tex Avery was posted, with six tips Jones learned from Avery about art and animation:

Happy 75th Anniversary, Bugs Bunny! Bugs first appearance was on July 27, 1940 in a short cartoon directed by Tex Avery, “A Wild Hare”. In August of 1980 when Tex passed away, Chuck wrote an appreciation that appeared in the Los Angeles Times. It said in part:

“What Tex taught me was this:

“1. You must love what you caricature. You must not mock it–unless it is ridiculously self-important.

“2. You must learn to respect that golden atom, that single-frame of action, that 1/24th of a second, because the difference between lightning and the lightning bug may hinge on that single frame.

“3. You must respect the impulsive thought and try to implement it. You cannot perform as a director by what you already know, you must depend on the flash of inspiration that you do not expect and do not know. Read the rest of this entry »


THE NINE COMMANDMENTS: 9 Strict Rules Every ‘Road Runner’ Cartoon Had to Follow

Roadrunner

Try as hard as he might, Wile E. Coyote could never quite catch the Road Runner. Now, the nine rules set for the series by the creator behind the Looney Tunes classic, which stacked the deck against the character, have caused much social media buzz.

Chuck Jones‘ rules that governed each and every encounter between Road Runner and Wile E. Coyote have gone viral on Twitter after director Amos Posner shared a page from the 1999 autobiography of Jones, Chuck Jones, Chuck Amuck: The Life and Times of an Animated Cartoonist.

The nine strict rules made sure there was no dialog apart from “beep beep,” that every episode was set in the American south west, that Wile E. Coyote only shopped at Acme Corporation despite the appalling success rate of their products and, most tellingly, gravity was to be the coyote’s worst enemy whenever possible…(read more)

Hollywood Reporter