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[VIDEO] Berkeley Protesters Take the Pepsi Challenge

Vito brings the taste of a new generation to a violent protest. Can he bridge the divide and save our great nation!?

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*DISCLAIMER* I am not affiliated with the alt-right / antifa / whatever. This video is not an endorsement of anyone or anything (except Pepsi)(though seriously fuck Pepsi for that dumbass ad)

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Music Credit:
Laser Groove by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0

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[VIDEO] ‘Controversial’ Coke Ad Preserved by Latino Rebels: Coca-Cola Apologizes For Ad Showing White People Doing Something Nice

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White people are bad, and everything they do is intrinsically racist. Especially when you throw free-market capitalism into the mix.

Nina Lakhani at the miserable, communist Guardian:

Coca-Cola issued a rare apology and was forced to pull an online advert which was deemed offensive to Mexico’s indigenous people by consumers, media and advocacy groups in the country.

The ad shows fair-skinned, attractive, young people turning up at an indigenous town bearing gifts of sugary fizzy drinks and a Christmas tree for the overawed locals. The company said its ad, set in the Mixe town of Totontepec in the state of Oaxaca, was meant to “convey a message of unity and joy”. Instead, it “reproduced and reinforced stereotypes of indigenous people as culturally and racially subordinate”, according to activists, who want the company sanctioned by the government’s anti-discrimination commission.

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I’m glad Latino Rebels saved this hateful, white-supremacist propaganda for posterity. What do those white people think they’re doing? Don’t they know they’re white? (read more)

Source: The Daily Caller


Tastes Like Freedom

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Review: Black Rifle Coffee

 writes: Veteran-owned Black Rifle Coffee Company (BRCC) sent the Washington Free Beacon some coffee to try and, since reviewing ultra American food is a thing we’ve gotten into lately, we did. We were lucky enough to try out BRCC’s Caffeinated as Fuck, Combat Fuel, Sniper’s Hide, and Gunship blends.

There were some bumps along the way. When we began this journey the Beacon office only had a Keurig and the coffee we got didn’t come in K-cups. So, we bought some of those K-cups you can put your own coffee in but our Keurig was apparently designed specifically to make sure those don’t fit. Unfortunately, somebody didn’t realize this tried to force the cup in and ended up smashing the machine to bits with his bare hands.

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Gunship / Stephen Gutowski

The Keurig has since been replaced and we ended up just buying a separate $9 coffee maker from Walmart so we could try the BRCC coffee. We never did find out who broke the machine, but given Bill McMorris’s past conduct, I’m relatively sure it was him.

[Read the whole review here, at Washington Free Beacon]

The most popular blend with the Free Beacon staff was Caffeinated as Fuck, by a wide margin. Caffeinated as Fuck was developed in partnership with the veterans group OAF Nation—the OAF stands for “Operator as Fuck,” naturally.

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Caffeinated as Fuck / Stephen Gutowski

“This dark roasted cup of freedom is the only coffee in the word worthy of our brand and the M32,” OAF Nation said of the coffee on BRCC’s site. “Get some!”

“This coffee is a blend of Colombian and Brazilian Arabica. Both will be dark, chocolaty and taste like freedom.” Read the rest of this entry »


[VIDEO] Jimmy Kimmel Show: Jon Hamm Suggests Alternate Mad Men Ending

As Jon Hamm explained to Jimmy Kimmel last night, Mad Men creator Matthew Weiner had been thinking about ending the show with that iconic Coca-Cola commercial for years before the company cleared the way for him to use it. If things had gone a different way, the ending might have had a slightly different impact…(read more)

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BONUS CLIP: Lizzy Caplan reveals why she’s “better” than her friend, actor Jon Hamm. Jon then decides to join Lizzy on our stage and plead his case.


In Perfect Harmony: Mad Men Finale

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The Real Story Behind ‘Mad Men’s’ ‘I’d Like to Buy the World a Coke’ Ad

(Warning: spoilers) John Jurgensen writes: For Don Draper, enlightenment apparently came in the form of the perfect advertising pitch. After sinking to the depths of anguish, loss and emptiness in the series finale of Mad Men,” Don ended up in lotus position, bathed in sunshine on a hillside, with a sphinx-like smile on his face. Cut to a grainy 1971 commercial for Coca-Cola, one of the most famous TV spots in advertising history.

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The implication (which sharp viewers predicted, after so many Coke allusions in recent episodes) was that Don would return to McCann Erickson with a brilliant idea in hand for a commercial featuring a multiracial cast singing about a world living in “perfect harmony,” thanks to a particular soda.

In fact, the real-life person behind the idea was a creative director at McCann Erickson named Bill Backer…(read more)

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China: Coca Cola Poster, 1948

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IT’S FRIDAY! Have a Refreshment

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Coca Cola ad, 1947


Super Bowl Ads: The Best, The Worst, The Movies and NBC

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 writes: Super Bowl advertising is almost invariably overrated, which doesn’t spare us from the impulse — even the need — to rate it.

“As usual, the hype surrounding the ads turned many into a super-bust, suggesting that the folks on Madison Avenue are either bereft of ideas or, in some instances, taking too much advantage of liberalized pot laws.”

There was some excitement going into the game about an influx of relatively new advertisers, offering the promise of new blood. But just as a wave of newcomers in 2000 preceded the dot-com meltdown, this year’s crop of novice sponsors merely exposed a lot of not-ready-for-primetime players in the marketing world.

Of course, the criticism isn’t limited to the new guys. Car companies in general had a bad day. And Budweiser– which traditionally wields the biggest stick during the game – didn’t so much come up with new creative as recycle it, going back to the cross-species love affair between puppies and Clydesdales and erecting a giant Pac-Man maze to prove that, um, what was the point of that Bud Light spot again? (Admittedly, the puppy ad will no doubt be one of the day’s most popular in snap polls.)

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“There was also a surplus of poorly utilized celebrities, including Mindy Kaling for Nationwide; Kim Kardashian for T-Mobile, along with Chelsea Handler and Sarah Silverman; and Pierce Brosnan for Kia. And while Liam Neeson was great, can anybody remember what the product was?”

The overall mix once again seemed to careen from the hopelessly schmaltzy (“Care makes a man stronger,” says Dove) to the simply goofy (Doritos strapping a rocket to a pig) to the borderline bizarre, such as Snickers dropping Danny Trejo and Steve Buscemi into an old “The Brady Bunch” episode.

There was also a surplus of poorly utilized celebrities, including Mindy Kaling for Nationwide; Kim Kardashian for T-Mobile, along with Chelsea Handler and Sarah Silverman; and Pierce Brosnan for Kia. And while Liam Neeson was great, can anybody remember what the product was?

Another subcategory would be the overproduced extravaganza, such as Mercedes’ CGI “Tortoise & the Hare” retelling or Bud Light’s aforementioned Pac-Man spot. Some of these fare well in audience surveys, but the link between creative and advertiser is so tenuous the benefits often seem exaggerated. And while it’s not necessarily fair, both Microsoft and Toyota’s ads featuring people walking thanks to prosthetic blades were undermined in part by the specter of Olympic runner Oscar Pistorius, who was found guilty of murder last year.

“Finally, there were the public-service announcements, with the sobering NoMore.org domestic violence spot – which resonated in light of the NFL’s Ray Rice fiasco – and Always’ ‘Like a Girl’ campaign. Yet as compelling as those spots were, they almost have to be broken out separately from more directly commercial advertising.”

So what were the principal highlights and lowlights? Separating out movies (which are essentially their own animal), public-service announcements and NBC’s promos for its midseason lineup, they loosely breakdown as follows:

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THE BEST

ESurance: Tapping Bryan Cranston in “Breaking Bad” mode was a genius move, mostly because of the instant cool the association creates in the mind of the show’s fans. In this case, they really did have a lot of us at hello.

Fiat: Look, we all know car ads are essentially about sex. Fiat made the connection overt by dropping a Viagra tablet into one of its cars. If not the best ad of the day, it was the most truthful, since it’s hard to think of any other reason to drive a Fiat.

Carnival Cruises: Wedding John F. Kennedy’s voice discussing man’s love affair with the ocean to beautiful imagery of ships at sea accomplished the near-impossible: It almost made me forget Kathie Lee Gifford and think, at least momentarily, about taking a Carnival Cruise. Plus, in practical terms, the Kennedy-era contingent probably a big part of the company’s target demo.

Coca-Cola: While it’s unlikely spilling Coke on the Internet will sap the venom out of Web comments and our political discourse, it’s hard not to applaud the underlying sentiment and idealism. Notably, McDonald’s went for a similar uplifting spiel with its “Pay With Lovin’” ad, which is probably effective from a marketing standpoint but felt cloying as a commercial. Read the rest of this entry »


BREAKING: General Mills’ ‘French Toast Crunch’ Cereal is Back by Popular Demand

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Sugar-blasted Breakfast Treat Gets New Life

NEW YORK (CNNMoney) — 2006 was the year Twitter debuted and Pluto was demoted to dwarf planet status. It was also the last time French Toast Crunch cereal was for sale in U.S. stores.

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“Little toast-shaped, maple-flavored bites of deliciousness…”

Now, General Mills has given the sugar-blasted breakfast treat new life, announcing its return to supermarket shelves after an eight-year hiatus.

The distinctive “little toast-shaped, maple-flavored bites of deliciousness,” as General Mills describes them, were survived by their sister cereal Cinnamon Toast Crunch.

General Mills said it was responding to demand by relaunching French Toast Crunch.

But it also wants to ride a wave of nostalgia: Children who ate the cereal in the mid-to-late 1990s are now in their 20s and buying cereal themselves. Read the rest of this entry »


Photo by Alfred Eisenstaedt: Little Boy Selling Coca Cola, Atlanta, Ca. 1936

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Little boy selling Coca-Cola, Atlanta, ca. 1936. Photo by Alfred Eisenstaedt.


Presidential Historian: Coca-Cola’s Revised Ad Shows Americans Still See Country as ‘Melting Pot’

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Michael Patrick Leahy  reports:  In an exclusive interview with Breitbart News, presidential historian Craig Shirley said that Coca-Cola’s decision to revise their controversial “America the Beautiful” ad and specifically reference America’s unofficial motto, “E Pluribus Unum,” in the ad’s opening segment shows that the company quickly understood their original ad missed the mark with the majority of Americans.

“The storm of opposition to Coke’s infamously tasteless ad shows that a vast majority of Americans still see this country as a melting pot and not a gaggle of entitled special interest groups…”

Read the rest of this entry »


BlackBerry Sues the Competition

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When patent law blocks innovation

Jesse Walker  writes:  Patents are supposed to foster innovation by restricting competition—in the Constitution’s words, to “promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts” by giving inventors a temporary “exclusive Right” to their creations. But sometimes those restrictions can suppress innovation instead of encouraging it.

Consider the Typo Keyboard Case, which is supposed to start shipping to consumers this month. The idea behind the device is simple. Right now, people who prefer a smartphone with a physical keyboard basically have just one option, the BlackBerry. If you like real keyboards but prefer the iPhone’s operating system, you have to either put up with the BlackBerry’s software or put up with the iPhone’s virtual keyboard; no phone-maker offers a product that combines the best of both worlds. The Typo fills that gap. It’s a case that lets you slip a keypad over an iPhone and type the way the QWERTY gods intended, without a flat touchscreen that makes errors inevitable and without an algorithm that “corrects” words that weren’t errors in the first place.

Read the rest of this entry »


Something is wrong with my Coke

Brand integrity issues in Hong Kong. Exhibit A: Bottled Coca Cola appears somewhat questionable.

Brand integrity issues in Hong Kong. Exhibit A: Bottled Coca Cola appears somewhat questionable.

“Just goes to prove that it is really tough to manage your channel when you are one of the biggest. Not going to buy my Coke here.”

Is this the new, new Coke? –The Butcher

Brilliantly documented by emba_ron

Read the rest of this entry »


A Brief History of American Prosperity

Via City Journal
by Guy Sorman

An entrepreneurial culture and the rule of law have nourished the nation’s economic dynamism.

Autumn 2012

Worry over America’s recent economic stagnation, however justified, shouldn’t obscure the fact that the American economy remains Number One in the world. The United States holds 4.5 percent of the world’s population but produces a staggering 22 percent of the world’s output—a fraction that has remained fairly stable for two decades, despite growing competition from emerging countries. Not only is the American economy the biggest in absolute terms, with a GDP twice the size of China’s; it’s also near the top in per-capita income, currently a bit over $48,000 per year. Only a few small countries blessed with abundant natural resources or a concentration of financial services, such as Norway and Luxembourg, can claim higher averages.

America’s predominance isn’t new; indeed, it has existed since the early nineteenth century. But where did it come from? And is it in danger of disappearing?

By the 1830s, the late British economist Angus Maddison showed, American per-capita income was already the highest in the world. One might suppose that the nation could thank its geographical size and abundance of natural resources for its remarkable wealth. Yet other countries in the nineteenth century—Brazil is a good example—had profuse resources and vast territories but failed to turn them to comparable economic advantage.

A major reason that they failed to compete was their lack of strong intellectual property rights. The U.S. Constitution, by contrast, was the first in history to protect intellectual property rights: it empowered Congress “to promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts, by securing for limited Times to Authors and Inventors the exclusive Right to their respective Writings and Discoveries.” As Thomas Jefferson, who became the first commissioner of the patent office, observed, the absence of accumulated wealth in the new nation meant that its most important economic resource was innovation—and America’s laws encouraged that innovation from the outset. Over two centuries later, the United States has more patents in force—1.8 million—than any other nation (Japan, with 1.2 million, holds second place). America is also the leader in “triadic patents” (that is, those filed in the United States, Europe, and Asia) registered every year—with 13,715 in 2009, the most recent year for which statistics are available, ahead of Japan’s 13,322 and Germany’s 5,764.

Another reason for early American prosperity was that the scarcity of population in a vast territory had pushed labor costs up from the very beginning of the colonial era. By the early nineteenth century, American wages were significantly higher than those in Europe. This meant that landowners, to make a profit, needed high levels of productivity—and that, in turn, meant the mechanization of agriculture, which got under way in America before it did overseas.

The replacement of labor with capital investment helped usher in the American industrial revolution, as the first industrial entrepreneurs took advantage of engineering advances developed in the fields. The southern states made a great economic as well as moral error in deciding to keep exploiting slaves instead of hiring well-paid workers and embracing new engineering technologies. The South started to catch up with the rest of the nation economically only after turning fully to advanced engineering in the 1960s as a response to rising labor costs.

Read the rest of this entry »