Advertisements

Czech Republic Plans To Combat Terrorism By Arming Its Citizens

Czech Republic Votes To Put Gun Rights In Constitution.

‘In reaction to the recent increase of security threats’

Jacob Bojesson The lower house of the Czech parliament voted to put gun owners’ rights in the constitution Wednesday, arguing it protects citizens from Islamist terrorists.

The European Commission passed stricter gun laws in December in response to a growing terror threat. The Czech Republic was one of three countries to oppose the changes, and it is now about to make it legal for citizens to use firearms to protect the security of the country.

“This constitutional bill is in reaction to the recent increase of security threats, especially the danger of violent acts such as isolated terrorist attacks … active attackers or other violent hybrid threats,” a draft of the bill reads.

Critics argue the changes will never take effect as European Union directives overrule the proposed legislation.

“Putting it in the constitution is therefore nonsense,” Jan Farský, the deputy mayor of Chovanec, told Hospodarske Noviny. Read the rest of this entry »

Advertisements

European Ruling against Apple and Ireland Vindicates Brexit

apple-store-foster-and-partners-ceiling1

The European Union has shown itself to be a compulsory tax cartel.

 writes: Taxation is bad enough: two consenting parties arrange a mutually-beneficial exchange, and an interloping third party demands a cut.

What compounded injustice then for a fourth party to enter the scene: a super-state/super-bandit who insists that the shakedown wasn’t big enough. No, the victim must hand over more to the lesser thief, even against the recipient’s will and in spite of his protest!

Tim Cook

Thou Shalt Not… Not Steal

Ireland must join the rest of the Union in bleeding the private sector dry.

That is what happened today when the European Commission slapped Apple Inc. with a $14.5 billion bill for back taxes, ruling that Ireland had violated European Union rules by taxing the tech company at too low a rate.

[Read the full story here, at Foundation for Economic Education]

But the Irish government doesn’t want the money! It had promised the low rates decades ago to entice Apple to set up and keep shop in Ireland, bringing the struggling country desperately needed jobs and economic growth. Irish officials are worried that if they renege on that deal, they will risk driving off the geese that lay the golden eggs: Apple, and other businesses as well.

Featured Image -- 82153

But no, insists the European super-state: sustainably prudent parasitism is not an option. The Irish government must join the rest of the Union in recklessly bleeding its private sector hosts dry until the whole system collapses under its own dead weight. Read the rest of this entry »


Apple Stands Up to The Feds: Formally Appeals eBooks Antitrust Ruling, Asks for Monitor to be Suspended

apple-ibooks-doj_620x350

Apple has formally appealed the Department of Justice’s ebooks antitrust case, via the Associated Press. Previously, Apple has only officially complained about the power of the appointed monitor — now they are asking for the entire case to be re-evaluated.

Apple said that the ruling is a “radical departure” from modern antitrust law.

Apple claims it was ignorant of any inter-publisher price fixing and that Apple setup iBooks through legal arrangements without knowledge of any behind-the-scenes collusion.

Read the rest of this entry »


Judge appoints external monitor to ensure Apple complies with antitrust laws

ipad-ebooks-photoYoni Heisler reports: This past July, US District Judge Denise Cotefound Apple guilty of colluding with book publishers in an effort to raise the price of e-books across the industry. Following that, the Department of Justice proposed a wide array of remedies to ensure that Apple wouldn’t run afoul of antitrust laws in the future.

One of the proposed remedies called for the court to appoint an external monitor tasked with keeping an eye on Apple as to ensure that they comply with antitrust laws going forward. On Wednesday, Judge Cote appointed former Assistant US Attorney Michael Bromwich as that external monitor.

CNET reports:

Bromwich was one of two names picked by the Justice Department as well as plaintiff states as part of last month’s injunction ruling. As monitor, he’ll work from inside Apple to maintain the company’s compliance with US antitrust laws.

Bromwich filled a similar, independent monitor role within the Metropolitan Police Department of the District of Columbia a little more than a decade ago, and more recently served as part of US oversight on the oil industry.

Apple previously argued that an external monitor was wholly unnecessary, but ultimately failed to persuade Cote.

Bromwich will keep an eye on Apple’s antitrust compliance for two years. Note that the two-year period is less than the five-year period initially proposed by the DOJ.

Lastly, Apple earlier this month filed a motion indicating that it plans to appeal Cote’s ruling. Formal arguments on the matter, however, won’t be submitted until early 2014.

The Unofficial Apple Weblog