Dems’ Objections to OTC Birth Control?

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Republicans Are Behind It

S. E. Cupp writes: A long, long time ago — way back in 2013 — pro-choice progressives united in a new clarion call to make prescription birth control available over the counter. Now, for political reasons, they’re changing their tune.

“So why can’t we have this, when the public and the medical establishment both think it’s a great idea?

—  Progressive journalist Amanda Marcotte, two years ago

If you’re one of the 10 million women in America who uses the pill, the prospect is nothing short of life-changing. Going to the doctor to refill the pill every month or even a couple times a year is annoying and time-consuming. And, according to many doctors, it’s unnecessary. The pill is safe to take without a prescription.

[Also see – Over-the-Counter Birth Control Bill Provokes Irrational Ire on the Left]

“So why can’t we have this, when the public and the medical establishment both think it’s a great idea?” asked progressive journalist Amanda Marcotte two years ago.

[More – Liberals could lose the ‘war on women’ talking point]

Indeed. Just last year, far-left women’s groups Planned Parenthood and Emily’s List also thought making birth control available OTC was a great idea.

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“Why the about-face? Well, the story the libs are going with is that the bill will actually make the pill more expensive once it’s no longer prescription…Which would be a fair point if it were true.”

And according to a Reason-Rupe poll, so do 70 percent of Americans.

Well, in an uncanny and highly unusual turn of events, lawmakers in Washington actually listened. Just this week, legislators introduced a bill that would encourage drug companies to apply to sell contraceptives without a prescription.

[Read the full text here, at TownHall.com]

But if Republican Sens. Cory Gardner of Colorado and Kelly Ayotte of New Hampshire, along with four other GOP senators, were expecting flowers from Planned Parenthood and others for their bill, the Allowing Greater Access to Safe and Effective Contraception Act, they should brace for disappointment. Suddenly, the idea doesn’t sound so great, and the former supporters aren’t mincing words. Read the rest of this entry »


Get Ready for Voter Fraud in Colorado

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Premeditated: A new election law leaves the door wide open for abuse in hotly contested races

John Fund writes: Perhaps the most hard-fought Senate race this year will be Colorado’s showdown between Democratic senator Mark Udall and Republican congressman Cory Gardner. The RealClearPolitics average of polls in the race shows FraudGardner holding a lead of 1.3 percentage points. The outcome may determine control of the U.S. Senate, and the margin of victory could be less than the 11,000-vote margin by which Democratic senator Michael Bennet was reelected in Colorado in 2010.

[Also see: John Fund’s Voter Fraud: We’ve Got Proof It’s Easy]

But there is a significant difference in this year’s Senate race. In 2013, a new Democratic state legislature rammed through a sweeping and highly controversial election law and convinced Democratic governor John Hickenlooper to sign it. The law, known as House Bill 1303, makes Colorado the only state in the country to combine two radical changes in election law: 1) government-voteabolishing the traditional polling place and having every voter mailed a ballot and 2) establishing same-day registration, which allows someone to appear at a government office and register and vote on the same day without showing photo ID or any other verifiable evidence that establishes identity. If they register online a few days before, no human being ever has to show up to register or vote. A few keystrokes can create a voter and a “valid” ballot. ​Once a ballot cast under same-day registration is mixed in with others, there is no way to separate it out if the person who voted is later found ineligible. Other jurisdictions that have same-day registration, such as Washington, D.C., treat the vote as a provisional ballot pending verification. Colorado immediately counts the vote.

“We have uniquely combined two bad ideas, both of which open the door to fraud and error along with creating huge administrative headaches,” warns Republican Scott Gessler, Colorado’s secretary of state. Along with the liberal Denver Post (the state’s leading newspaper) and a few Republican clerks from the state’s largest counties, Gessler fought passage of the law.fund-book

[Order John Fund’s book Who’s Counting?: How Fraudsters and Bureaucrats Put Your Vote at Risk from Amazon.com]

Wayne Williams is the clerk of El Paso County, which includes Colorado Springs, the state’s second-largest city. He says HB 1303 was sold as a way to “modernize” elections and increase turnout, but it’s fixing a system that wasn’t broken. In 2012, Colorado was among the top three states in the turnout of eligible citizens. Its number of registered voters that year climbed 13.7 percent, well above normal population growth. At the same time, the state’s online voter-registration system processed 250,000 changes submitted by voters, ensuring a more accurate and less duplicative record of the electorate. Read the rest of this entry »


[VIDEO] GOP Candidate Cory Gardner’s New Ad Backs Over-the-Counter Birth Control

Washington Examiner reports: Colorado Republican Senate candidate Cory Gardner is calling for birth-control pills to be sold without a prescription in a new TV ad, putting campaign cash behind a conservative argument that’s been picking up steam in recent months.

“I believe the pill ought to be available over the counter, round the clock, without a prescription — cheaper and easier, for you.”

In a 30-second ad released Tuesday, Gardner argues for cheaper, over-the-counter access to birth-control pills, an argument he previously made in a June op-ed in the Denver Post.

[In an op-ed in 2012, Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal argued that adult women should be allowed to buy birth-control pills without a prescription.]

[In 2013, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, a leading group of women’s physicians, endorsed over-the-counter birth-control pills.]

[Here’s how it’s reported in backward, behind-the-times New York City – Bobby Jindal Offers “Unexpected” Endorsement of Over the Counter Birth Control Pills – nymag.com]

Gardner is running a highly competitive race against incumbent Democratic Sen. Mark Udall, but he’s not the first one to call for over-the-counter birth control. Read the rest of this entry »


Charlie Cook: How 2014 Could Give the GOP False Hope

(Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

Republicans could win the midterms without fixing the party’s problems.

 writes: …Amy Walter wrote a piece about Republicans who worry privately that success in 2014 will leave their party with false hope for 2016: “Even though their party is poised to hold the House and has a good chance of winning control of the Senate, these Republican umbrella carriers aren’t smiling. They worry that success in 2014 will mask the real, structural problems that Republicans need to fix before 2016. Namely, that the party doesn’t stand for much more than standing against President Obama. As important, the GOP heads into 2016 with a brand that has been deeply tarnished and not easily repaired.”

“Republicans do great among those 65 years of age and older, and well among those between 45 and 64. However, they are getting crushed among those between 18 and 29, as well as losing 30-to-44-year-olds…”

This is so true. If Republicans do gain a Senate majority, which they may very well do in November, and manage to pick up eight or more House seats, it will be because of who they are not, not because of who they are. They aren’t in Obama’s party, and they aren’t in the party that unilaterally passed the Affordable Care Act, which, like the president, is unpopular. Republicans may win a bunch of races without measurably improving their party’s “brand” and without making any clear progress among minority, young, moderate, and female voters. The fact that midterm electorates are generally older, whiter, and more conservative than their counterparts in presidential elections exacerbates the difference between the world of 2014 and the one that will exist in 2016. The Republicans can win in 2014 without having fixed their problems. Read the rest of this entry »