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[VIDEO] Wood Turned Bamboo Death Star 

The build consists of making two segmented halves that seam together at the trench. Each half is made of 9 rings. Each ring has 13 segments. (13 seemed like an evil number). There is one extra ring to help the two halves overlap at the seam. The superlaser dish was turned separately. The hole in the Death Star and the profile of the dish were cut on the CNC router to allow to two to fit together.

Some of the tools used in this project Read the rest of this entry »

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[PHOTO] Guitar of the Day

guitar-project


Do You Have an Inexplicable Love of Baked Potatoes, with Butter? This is the Chair for You

baked-potato-chair

BFiberandCraft made this incredibly awesome Baked Potato Bean Bag Chair that even comes with a Butter Pat Pillow for the ultimate comfort food experience. Everyone knows that butter makes anything better.

“Do you have an inexplicable love of baked potatoes? This is the chair for you! Even if you don’t like baked potatoes, this chair is absolutely the most comfortable thing you will ever sit in! Made from hand-dyed cotton, you will sink into its cushion-y softness and never want to get out! Comes complete with a satin butter pillow!”

After a heavenly nap on this tater we’d probably wake up in a happy puddle of drool. Read the rest of this entry »


Hackers, Makers, and the Next Industrial Revolution

Enthusiasts of the maker movement foresee a third industrial revolution. Illustration by Harry Campbell.

Enthusiasts of the maker movement foresee a third industrial revolution. Illustration by Harry Campbell.

Evgeny Morozov  writes:  In January of 1903, the small Boston magazine Handicraft ran an essay by the Harvard professor Denman W. Ross, who argued that the American Arts and Crafts movement was in deep crisis. The movement was concerned with promoting good taste and self-fulfillment through the creation and the appreciation of beautiful objects; its more radical wing also sought to advance worker autonomy. The problem was that no one in America seemed to need its products. The solution, according to Ross, was to provide technical education to the critics and the consumers of art alike. This would stimulate demand for high-quality objects and encourage more workers to take up craftsmanship. The cause of the Arts and Crafts movement would be achieved, he maintained, only “when the philosopher goes to work and the working man becomes a philosopher.”

In a long rebuttal, Mary Dennett, who later became an important advocate for women’s rights, pointed out that the roots of the problem were economic and moral. Reforming the school curriculum wouldn’t do much to change the structural conditions that made craftsmanship impossible. The Arts and Crafts movement was spending far too much time on “rag-rugs, baskets, and . . . exhibitions of work chiefly by amateurs,” rather than asking the most basic questions about inequality. “The employed craftsman can almost never use in his own home things similar to those he works on every day,” she observed, because those things were simply unaffordable. Economics, not aesthetics, explained the movement’s failures. “The modern man, who should be a craftsman, but who, in most cases, is compelled by force of circumstances to be a mill operative, has no freedom,” she wrote earlier. “He must make what his machine is geared to make.”

Read the rest of this entry »


[VIDEO] Park Seung-mo’s Wire Art

Wire art is certainly nothing new, head down to any local craft fair and you’ll probably find a little wire frog or ostrich overflowing with folksy charm.

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