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[VIDEO] U.S. Flies Bombers Near North Korean Border

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The U.S. Air Force on Tuesday conducted a low-altitude flight over South Korea in a show of force against North Korea, which last week conducted its fifth and most powerful nuclear test to date.

 

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[VIDEO] ‘Kumbaya’: Activists & Feminists Cross Demilitarized Zone Between North and South Korea to Buy the World a Coke

The group wants to promote peace, love, harmony, understanding, and reconciliation between the two sides

A international group of female activists crossed the border between North and South Korea on Sunday to promote peace between the two countries, which have yet to sign a peace treaty 60 years after the Korean War ended.

“Several groups have criticized the march, arguing that the women should have crossed the North Korea-China border, which is more dangerous than the DMZ. Others called the crossing “empty,” blasting the activists for allowing North Korea an opportunity to cover up its record of human rights abuses.”

The group of about 30 women, WomenCrossDMZ, was taken by bus across the Korean Demilitarized Zone (DMZ), CNN reports, which was created by a 1953 armistice that halted, but never ended, the Korean War.

U.S. activist Gloria Steinem, sixth right in front, two Nobel Peace Prize laureates Mairead Maguire, from Northern Ireland, second from right, Leymah Gbowee, from Liberia, third from right, and other activists march to the Imjingak Pavilion with South Korean activists along the military wire fences near the border village of Panmunjom, in Paju, north of Seoul, South Korea, Sunday, May 24, 2015. International women activists including Steinem and two Nobel Peace laureates on Sunday were denied an attempt to walk across the Demilitarized Zone dividing North and South Korea, but were allowed to cross by bus and complete what one of them called a landmark peace event. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)

U.S. activist Gloria Steinem, sixth right in front, two Nobel Peace Prize laureates Mairead Maguire, from Northern Ireland, second from right, Leymah Gbowee, from Liberia, third from right, and other activists march to the Imjingak Pavilion with South Korean activists along the military wire fences near the border village of Panmunjom, in Paju, north of Seoul, South Korea, Sunday, May 24, 2015. International women activists including Steinem and two Nobel Peace laureates on Sunday were denied an attempt to walk across the Demilitarized Zone dividing North and South Korea, but were allowed to cross by bus and complete what one of them called a landmark peace event. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)

The crossing was sanctioned by both sides, and included feminist Gloria Steinem and Nobel laureates Leymah Gbowee of Liberia and Mairead Maguire of Northern Ireland.

Several groups have criticized the march….(read more)

[TIME]


[VIDEO] What If You Could Live for 10,000 years? Q&A with Transhumanist Zoltan Istvan

“I’m not saying let’s live forever,” says Zoltan Istvan, transhumanist author, philosopher, and political candidate. “I think what we want is the choice to be able to live indefinitely. That might be 10,000 years; that might only be 170 years.”

“I’d say the number one goal of transhumanism is trying to conquer death.”

Istvan devoted his life to transhumanism after nearly stepping on an old landmine while reporting for National Geographic channel in Vietnam’s demilitarized zone.

“I’d say the number one goal of transhumanism is trying to conquer death,” says Istvan.

Reason TV‘s Zach Weissmueller interviewed Istvan about real-world life-extension technology ranging from robotic hearts to cryogenic stasis, Istvan’s plan to run for president under the banner of the Transhumanist party, the overlap between the LGBT movement and transhumanism, and the role that governments play in both aiding and impeding transhumanist goals.

Approximately 10 minutes. Produced by Zach Weissmueller. Camera by Justin Monticello and Paul Detrick. Music by Anix Gleo and nthnl.