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[VIDEO] SUPERCUTS! Watch A Bunch Of Democrats Try To Steal Our Democracy 

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[VIDEO] Highlights From the Anti-Trump Electoral College Tantrums 

You can almost taste the delicious liberal tears.

Donald Trump won the electoral college on Election Night, which means he is going to be the next president. That’s because the electoral college—not the popular vote — is the only thing that matters in our presidential elections.

The electoral college participants formally cast their votes on Monday. Some liberals had hoped enough of the electors would change their votes to deny Trump the presidency. That didn’t happen. Read the rest of this entry »


FOR THE LOVE OF ALL THAT IS HOLY: Faithless Electors Less Faithful to Clinton

faithless-dems

TRUMPAGEDDON 2.0: For all of the hype about electors switching their vote from reports, the majority of those electors who cast protest votes were supposed to vote for Hillary Clinton.

Salena Zito reports: Electoral College voters who were faithless on Monday were more upset with Hillary Clinton‘s candidacy than that of President-elect Trump.

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For all of the hype about electors switching their vote from reports: Trump to anyone but Trump, the majority of those electors who cast protest votes were supposed to vote for Hillary Clinton.

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Four electors in Washington state who were supposed to vote for Clinton instead voted otherwise: three for former Secretary of State Colin Powell, and one for a Native American leader. In contrast, just two electors in Texas voted against Trump.

The rules vary by state. In 29 states, electors are legally bound to vote for the winner of their state. The rest are not.

Voters who fail to vote the will of their state are known as faithless electors. “That occurrence is nothing new,” said Paul Sracic, a Youngstown State University political scientist and expert in the electoral college. “There have been approximately 157 electors have done just that in the past 200 plus years.” Read the rest of this entry »


[VIDEO] EMOPALOOZA 1.0: MSNBC Clip of Electors Having Election-Night Meltdowns

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REVISED: Signs (Not) Posted Around Her Brooklyn Campaign Headquarters

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“Don’t say…”

Revised from: The Extract


The US Election Without the Electoral College

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OUT: #SafetyPin IN: #DrainTheSwap

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In Case You Were Wondering: President Romney? Yes, if the election were held today

English: Governor Mitt Romney of MA

Aaron Blake writes: For Mitt Romney, the 2012 election was held about a year too early.

[I have to interrupt Aaron: The election was held at the right time. Romney would likely have achieved a decisive victory last November if not for the virtual blackout of media coverage unfavorable to the incumbent. It’s on the record: falsified job report numbers, systematic intimidation of citizen opposition groups by the IRS, and holding back of negative economic news until after the election. The massive cascade of job layoff news stories and bad economic reports that spilled out immediately after the election reveals the pre-election suppression beyond doubt.]

Romney would hold a slight lead on President Obama if the 2012 election were replayed today, according to a new Washington Post-ABC News poll.

The poll of registered voters shows Romney at 49 percent and Obama at 45 percent in the rematch, a mirror image of Romney’s four-point (51-47) popular-vote loss in 2012.

Obama’s shifting fortunes, of course, come as his signature health-care is increasingly embattled — both thanks to a glitchy Web site and a broken promise by Obama to allow people who like their insurance to keep it.

Obama’s loss of support is spread across many demographics, but he has suffered most among the young, the less-educated, the poor and, perhaps most interestingly, among liberals. Read the rest of this entry »


Analysis: Federalists vs. Technocrats

Today, we treat politics as a sport, but it’s really a conflict of ideologies between federalists and technocrats…

Illustration by Barbara Kelley

Illustration by Barbara Kelley

Bruce S. Thornton writes: The media and pundits treat politics like a sport. The significance of the recent agreement to postpone the debt crisis until January, for instance, is really about which party won and which lost, which party’s tactics are liable to be more successful in the next election, and which politician is a winner and which a loser. But politics rightly understood is not about the contest of policies or politicians. It’s about the philosophical principles and ideas that create one policy rather than another—that’s what it should be about, at least.

From that point of view, the conflict between Democrats and Republicans concerns the size and role of the federal government, which is no surprise to anyone who even casually follows politics. But more important are the ideas that ground arguments for or against limited government. These ideas include our notions of human nature, and what motivates citizens when they make political decisions. Our political conflicts today reflect the two major ways Americans have answered these questions.

Read the rest of this entry »

Wisconsin: The New Ohio?

Commentary By Scott Rasmussen

In Election 2000, Florida was the decisive state in the Electoral College. In 2004, Ohio was the ultimate battleground that put George W. Bush over the top. This year, it might come down to Wisconsin.

That’s a state President Obama won by 14 points four years ago. But Wisconsin has gone through an amazing two years of nonstop campaigning since Gov. Scott Walker was elected in 2010. After he took on the teachers unions, there were efforts to recall several Republican state senators and then Walker himself.

The governor not only survived, but he won more votes in his recall election this year than he won on Election Day in 2010. But it’s not what happened in Wisconsin that could make the state decisive in Election 2012; it’s what’s happening all around the country.

All signs point to a close race with just over a week to go. In fact, current polling suggests it might be close enough to produce a split decision, with Mitt Romney winning the popular vote and the president keeping his job with a victory in the Electoral College.

Read the rest of this entry »