Google’s Eric Schmidt Wore ‘Staff’ Badge at Hillary ‘Victory’ Party

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Hacked memo revealed Schmidt was working directly with the Clinton campaign

Google came under fire earlier this year for allegedly altering search results to paint Hillary Clinton in a more favorable light than Donald Trump. Schmidt stated at the time that Google did not pick sides in the presidential race.

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“We have not taken a position on the American election and nor do I expect us to,” Schmidt said at the time.

Despite this assurance, Schmidt provided funding to a tech startup called The Groundwork, one of the Clinton campaign’s biggest vendors.

[Read the full story here, at freebeacon.com]

Michael Slaby, the Obama campaign’s chief integration and innovation officer, developed The Groundwork through a company he co-founded called Timshel. The Clinton campaign paid the group $600,000 throughout the election cycle. Read the rest of this entry »


A Washington Gossip Column About Washington Gossip Columns

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Google executive chairman Eric Schmidt attended a party thrown by Google and the Hollywood Reporter on the eve of the 2014 White House Correspondents’ Association Dinner. Jonathan Ernst/Reuters

This Washington Post article is self-serving and shallow. But it’s written by a Politico hack, about Washington D.C. What else would we expect?

Patrick W. Gavin was a reporter at Politico from 2009 to 2014 and is currently at work on a documentary about the White House Correspondents’ Association Dinner.

Patrick W. Gavin writes:

It’s not been a good few years for the Washington gossip industry.

Politico, my home for five years before I left recently to pursue documentary filmmaking, once had six journalists — myself included — writing for its “Click” gossip section. All of us left over the years, and the section was disbanded in December.

“Gossip columns may be dying off, but gossip reconceived as a zero-calorie giggle nugget is alive and well.”

If Politico, whose success has been driven by its aggressive coverage of every move in Washington, has decided that there’s no more water to be squeezed from that rock, then trust me, it must be dry.

“The gossip hasn’t gone away — it’s gone mainstream.”

Look around. While long-standing columns such as The Washington Post’s “In the Loop” and The Reliable Source and U.S. News’s Washington Whispers are still around, many of their brethren are gone. The Washington Examiner folded its “Yeas & Nays” column. The Hill killed its “Washington Scene” section. Roll Call trimmed the staff of its “Heard on the Hill” column in half. The once-titillating Wonkette.com has turned away from snarky stories of Capitol Hill liaisons and toward snarky takes on actual policy. TMZ said it would start TMZDC.com in 2007; the site has yet to launch. Read the rest of this entry »


Google’s Eric Schmidt Wants a Ban on Amazon’s Drones

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 writes: “How would you feel,” Google chairman Eric Schmidt asked in the Guardian last April, “if your neighbour went over and bought a commercial observation drone that they can launch from their back yard. It just flies over your house all day. How would you feel about it?”

Good question. Especially after Jeff Bezos‘ announcement on 60 Minutes Sunday that Amazon plans to build and deploy across the U.S. a fleet of artificially intelligent delivery drones.

How would I feel about a drone that could snoop on me? Probably the same way I’d feel about a company that monitored all my online activities — the e-mail I send and receive, the websites I visit, the places I visit, the products I buy, the YouTubes I watch, etc. etc. — and sold that information to advertisers.

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Even law-abiding people should oppose surveillance

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“If you have something that you don’t want anyone to know,” Google CEO Eric Schmidt said in 2009, “maybe you shouldn’t be doing it in the first place.”

This line was creepy enough coming from one of President Obama’s confidants and fundraisers. It takes on added weight now that the Washington Post and the Guardian have reported that the National Security Agency’s Prism program, in the days before Obama was sworn in, tapped into Google’s servers, gaining access to every message sent or received over Gmail.

Google spokesmen, like spokesmen from all the tech companies, deny participating in any such program. So Americans are left to wonder: Was this corporate-government collusion? Was this federal hacking or infiltration of corporate servers?

These are murky questions, so let’s return for the time being to Schmidt’s point, and the question it raises: If you’re upset about the government reading your emails, or knowing whom you call — when, from where, and for how long — then what are you hiding?

In other words, why should law-abiding citizens mind federal surveillance?

The answer begins with this distressing reality: None of us scrupulously obeys the law. Technically speaking, we’re all criminals.

Federal and state criminal statutes have multiplied like rabbits over the decades, and so now everyone breaks the law, probably every day.

Copy a song to your laptop from a friend’s Beyonce CD? You just violated the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. Did you buy some clothes in Delaware because they were tax free? You’re probably evading taxes. Did you give your 20-year-old nephew a glass of wine at dinner? Illegal in many states.

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