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‘Paris est uno Fete’: Hemingway’s Paris Memoir Flies Off Shelves in Show of Defiance

Orders surged after a BFM television interview on Monday with a 77-year-old woman called Danielle, who urged people to read the memoir as she laid flowers for the dead. The video was shared hundreds of times on social media.

 reports: Ernest Hemingway’s memoir about the time he spent lounging in cafes and bars in 1920s Paris has become an unlikely totem of defiance against the terrorist attacks that claimed 129 lives in the City of Light last Friday.

“We ate well and cheaply and drank well and cheaply and slept well and warm together and loved each other.”

Hemingway’s ‘‘A Moveable Feast,’’ or “Paris est une Fete” in French, is flying off the shelves at bookstores across the French capital and is the fastest-selling biography and foreign-language book at online retailer Amazon.fr.

paris-feast

“Copies have been laid among the flowers and tributes at the sites of the massacres, and people are reading the book in bars and cafes.”

Daily orders of the memoir, first published in 1964, three years 51lVoALt-2L._SL250_after the American author’s death, have risen 50-fold to 500 since Monday, according to publisher Folio.

[Order Ernest Hemingway’s “A Moveable Feast: The Restored Edition” from Amazon.com]

Copies have been laid among the flowers and tributes at the sites of the massacres, and people are reading the book in bars and cafes, Folio spokesman David Ducreux said Thursday. Orders surged after a BFM television interview on Monday with a 77-year-old woman called Danielle, who urged people to read the memoir as she laid flowers for the dead. The video was shared hundreds of times on social media….(read more)

Source: Bloomberg Business

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Vintage Hemingway: ‘The Sun Also Rises’

Sun-Also-Hemingway

Scribner’s, 1926. This is a later printing with a different and more modern dust jacket from the stated first.. Check out the tagline: “Wherein the lost generation that followed the War goes to the devil with a smile on the lip but with despair in its heart.”

Flickr –Hemingway: Expository Writing Class 

[More: Hopkins Rare Books, Manuscripts, & Archives]

 


Books: The Authentic Hemingway

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Joshua Kotin on The Letters of Ernest Hemingway, Vol. 2 : 1923-1925

Joshua Kotin  writes:  Ernest Hemingway’s from the summer and fall of 1925 are especially thrilling. “I’ve written six chapters on a novel and am going great about 15,000 words already,” he tells Sylvia Beach in August. Two weeks later, in a letter to Ezra Pound, he declares, “48,000 words writ. […] If novel not suppressed sh’d sell 8 million copies.” “It is a hell of a fine novel,” he tells Jane Heap a few days later; “Written very simply and full of things happening and people and places and exciting as hell and no autobiographical 1st novel stuff.” Then in a letter to his father in September, he triumphantly announces, “I have finished my novel — 85,000 words — and am very tired inside and out.”

The completion of The Sun Also Rises, Hemingway’s first novel, is the denouement of the second volume of his letters, which collects his correspondence from 1923 to 1925. (The first volume, published in 2011, includes letters from 1907 to 1922.) The letters document his development as a writer, his life in Paris and Toronto (where he worked as a reporter for the Toronto Star), his travels across Europe (including to Pamplona and Schruns), his marriage to Hadley Richardson and the birth of their son, and his friendships and quarrels with Pound, Gertrude Stein, Ford Madox Ford, Sherwood Anderson, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and many others. The letters are a real time version of A Moveable Feast, combining the memoir’s romantic and gossipy depiction of expatriate life with a powerful sense of precarity. Hemingway describes his life as a struggling writer without knowledge of his future success.

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