[VIDEO] The Sexiest Man Alive

What makes a man sexy? What makes a man…a man? Is there something about being the “bad boy”? Or is it more about predictability and reliability? Jim Geraghty of National Review explains.

8. Hugh Beaumont as Ward Cleaver (Leave It To Beaver)

 

 


[VIDEO] SHOCK: TV Advertising That Doesn’t Demean, Mock, Diminish, and Insult Dads

#HowToDad


All Your Children Belong to Us

Family-Lenin-quote

RJ-Glenn CookFor the Las Vegas Review-Journal, Glenn Cook writes: Is any freedom more important, more sacred than the right to raise a family without government intrusion?

It’s a good question to ask this Independence Day weekend, as Americans reflect on the birth of a nation dedicated to the preservation of individual liberties: “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.”

“Don’t pretend to be shocked by this development. This is not a radical, new idea…”

But as government grows bigger and more powerful, as politicians, bureaucrats and busybodies increasingly think they know best, American families constantly must fight interference in their most personal decisions and judgments.free-range-kids

[Check out Lenore Skenazy’s book “Free-Range Kids, How to Raise Safe, Self-Reliant Children at Amazon.com]

Of all the threats to our freedoms — warrantless snooping, government secrecy, expanded police powers — none worries me more than the relentless march of the Nanny State, which not only assumes that all parents are unfit to raise children, but that parents themselves must be treated like children.

It’s not a stretch to say that this movement considers all children the property of the state. As proof, look at what’s happening in Scotland.

[Also see: Every Child in Scotland to Be Supervised by State-Appointed Busybody – reason.com]

The Scottish government for years has pursued what amounts to state-sponsored surveillance of families. By August 2016 — unless a court or public pressure can stop it — the country will appoint an official state guardian for every child in Scotland. Read the rest of this entry »


Now Wanted: Girl Babies in China

AFP Photo/Peter Parks

AFP Photo/Peter Parks

Tiffanie Wen writes:  According to the updated version of China’s new one-child policy,  formalized by the country’s top legislative committee in the final days of 2013, couples in which one parent is an only child are now permitted to have a second child. Rural couples whose first child is a girl are also entitled to a second, presumably so they can try for a much-coveted boy, which is particularly important in areas where men are needed to do the heavy lifting.

It’s easy to conceptualize this second part of the policy as indicative of China’s famous patriarchal system and history of infanticide and abandonment in favor of baby boys, responsible for millions of “lost girls” and an unbalanced sex ratio that will leave an estimated 30 million adult Chinese men unmarried by 2020.

Thankfully, the story is not so simple. According to experts on Chinese society and family planning, the value of women in China has actually been increasing as a consequence—surprisingly enough—of the oppressive one-child policy introduced in 1978 and enacted in 1979.

Read the rest of this entry »


Lost Generation

adoption

Adoption in America has collapsed; here’s what to do about it. 

Kevin D. Williamson  writes:  Adoption is an unexpectedly rare phenomenon in the United States, and that’s a supply-side problem. The United States is the third-most populous country in the world, and each year more than a third of our country’s 4 million births are to unmarried women, but it is estimated that in a typical year the total number of mothers who voluntarily relinquish their children for adoption is fewer than 14,000 — barely enough to make a statistical radar blip on the demographic Doppler. Would-be parents trek to the Far East and mount expeditions to South America because there are so few infants available for adoption in the United States.

At the same time, a half million children languish in foster care, awaiting permanent adoptive homes. There are would-be parents who want to adopt them, too, but this situation is more complex: Older children are less eagerly sought after, and the longer a child is in foster care the less likely he is to find a permanent home. The lot of these foster children has been made worse by years of bad public policy discouraging transracial adoptions — a significant barrier, since most of the couples looking to adopt are white and the children in foster care are disproportionately nonwhite. Supply and demand are wildly out of sync: If we were talking about consumer goods instead of children, we’d call this a market failure. And some of the most incisive critics of U.S. adoption policy are calling for reforms that would make adoption policies look a lot more like a market — that is, a system characterized by free and open cooperation — and a lot less like a welfare bureaucracy.

Read the rest of this entry »


Daddy Issues: a Navel-Gazing Autobiographical Essay about Generational Warfare…

…in which the writer explores his relationship with his father, and his relationship with the economic destiny of his generation. The son cites a lot of data, quotes a lot of statistics…

My son is a writer

My Son is a writer

…muses aloud about debt-to-GDP ratio, entitlements, and employment charts…recalls fondly his first ‘bittersweet victory’ winning an argument with his dad, in the fourth grade…confesses to readers about his failure to stop global warming because he neglected to compost his trash…indulges in fanciful descriptions of “snow-capped mountains”, “sun-drizzled lakes”, and the smell of “coppertone and wet dog”, in their “Northwest version of paradise”, is “mildly impressed” when his dad bothers to “mount a defense” when he calls him a “parasite” ….and asks readers to endure what it must feel like to be his father, and listen to this all day…

My Daddy Issues: The Knife is Slowly Twisting in My Side