Master Death List: Journalists Killed in Russia

murdered-journalist

56 Journalists Killed in Russia/Motive Confirmed

Terminology explained

Akhmednabi Akhmednabiyev, Novoye Delo

July 9, 2013, in Semender, Russia

Mikhail Beketov, Khimkinskaya Pravda

April 8, 2013, in Khimki, Russia

Kazbek Gekkiyev, VGTRK

December 5, 2012, in Nalchik, Russia

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Gadzhimurad Kamalov, Chernovik

December 15, 2011, in Makhachkala, Russia

Abdulmalik Akhmedilov, Hakikat and Sogratl

August 11, 2009, in Makhachkala , Russia

Natalya Estemirova, Novaya Gazeta, Kavkazsky Uzel

July 15, 2009, in between Grozny and Gazi-Yurt , Russia

Anastasiya Baburova, Novaya Gazeta 

January 19, 2009, in Moscow , Russia

Russian President Vladimir Putin (Reuters)

Telman (Abdulla) Alishayev, TV-Chirkei 

September 2, 2008, in Makhachkala, Russia

Magomed Yevloyev, Ingushetiya

August 31, 2008, in Nazran, Russia

Ivan Safronov, Kommersant

March 2, 2007, in Moscow, Russia

Maksim Maksimov, Gorod

November 30, 2006, in St. Petersburg, Russia

Anna Politkovskaya, Novaya Gazeta

October 7, 2006, in Moscow, Russia

Vagif Kochetkov, Trud and Tulsky Molodoi Kommunar

January 8, 2006, in Tula, Russia

Magomedzagid Varisov, Novoye Delo

June 28, 2005, in Makhachkala, Russia

Pavel Makeev, Puls

May 21, 2005, in Azov, Russia

Paul Klebnikov, Forbes Russia

July 9, 2004, in Moscow, Russia

Adlan Khasanov, Reuters

May 9, 2004, in Grozny, Russia

Aleksei Sidorov, Tolyatinskoye Obozreniye

October 9, 2003, in Togliatti, Russia

Yuri Shchekochikhin, Novaya Gazeta

July 3, 2003, in Moscow, Russia

Roddy Scott, Frontline

September 26, 2002, in Galashki Region, Ingushetia, Russia

Valery Ivanov, Tolyatinskoye Obozreniye

April 29, 2002, in Togliatti, Russia

Natalya Skryl, Nashe Vremya

March 9, 2002, in Rostov-on-Don, Russia

Eduard Markevich, Novy Reft

September 18, 2001, in Reftinsky, Sverdlovsk Region, Russia

Igor Domnikov, Novaya Gazeta

July 16, 2000, in Moscow, Russia

Aleksandr Yefremov, Nashe Vremya

May 12, 2000, in Chechnya, Russia

Vladimir Yatsina, ITAR-TASS

February 20, 2000, in Chechnya, Russia

Shamil Gigayev, Nokh Cho TV

October 29, 1999, in Shaami Yurt, Russia

Ramzan Mezhidov, TV Tsentr

October 29, 1999, in Shaami Yurt, Russia

Supian Ependiyev, Groznensky Rabochy

October 27, 1999, in Grozny, Russia

Anatoly Levin-Utkin, Yurichichesky Peterburg Segodnya

August 24, 1998, in St. Petersburg, Russia

Larisa Yudina, Sovietskaya Kalmykia Segodnya

June 8, 1998, in Elista, Russia

Putin-Breaking-Bad

Ramzan Khadzhiev, Russian Public TV (ORT)

August 11, 1996, in Grozny, Russia

Viktor Mikhailov, Zabaikalsky Rabochy

May 12, 1996, in Chita, Russia

Nina Yefimova, Vozrozhdeniye

May 9, 1996, in Grozny, Russia

Nadezhda Chaikova, Obshchaya Gazeta

March 30, 1996, in Gehki, Russia

Viktor Pimenov, Vaynakh Television

March 11, 1996, in Grozny, Russia

Felix Solovyov, freelance

February 26, 1996, in Moscow, Russia

Vadim Alferyev, Segodnyashnyaya Gazeta

December 27, 1995, in Krasnoyarsk, Russia

Shamkhan Kagirov, Rossiskaya Gazeta and Vozrozheniye

December 13, 1995, in near Grozny, Russia

Natalya Alyakina, Focus and RUFA

June 17, 1995, in Budyonnovsk, Russia

Farkhad Kerimov, Associated Press TV

May 29, 1995, in Chechnya, Russia

Vladislav Listyev, Russian Public Television (OTR)

March 1, 1995, in Moscow, Russia

Viatcheslav Rudnev, Freelancer

February 17, 1995, in Kaluga, Russia

Jochen Piest, Stern

January, 10, 1995, in Chervlyonna, Russia

Vladimir Zhitarenko, Krasnaya Zvezda

January 1, 1995, in Grozny, Russia

Cynthia Elbaum, Freelancer

December 22, 1994, in Grozny, Russia

Dmitry Kholodov, Mosckovski Komsomolets

October 17, 1994, in Moscow, Russia

Yuri Soltis, Interfax

June 12, 1994, in Moscow, Russia

Aleksandr Smirnov, Molodyozhny Kuryer

October 4, 1993, in Moscow, Russia

Aleksandr Sidelnikov, Lennauchfilm Studio

October 4, 1993, in Moscow, Russia

Sergei Krasilnikov, Ostankino Television Company

October 3, 1993, in Moscow, Russia

Yvan Scopan, TF-1 Television Company

October 3, 1993, in Moscow, Russia

Vladimir Drobyshev, Nature and Man

October 3, 1993, in Moscow, Russia

Igor Belozyorov, Ostankino State Broadcasting Company

October 3, 1993, in Moscow, Russia

Rory Peck, ARD Television Company

October 3, 1993, in Moscow, Russia

Dmitry Krikoryants, Expresskhronika

April 14, 1993, in Grozny, Russia Read the rest of this entry »


Dezinformatsiya: Russian Internet Trolls were Being Hired to Pose as Pro-Trump Americans

It’s a brand of information warfare, known as ‘dezinformatsiya,’ that has been used by the Russians since at least the Cold War. The disinformation campaigns are only one ‘active measure’ tool used by Russian intelligence to ‘sow discord among,’ and within, allies perceived hostile to Russia.

 reports: Russia’s troll factories were, at one point, likely being paid by the Kremlin to spread pro-Trump propaganda on social media.

That is what freelance journalist Adrian Chen, now a staff writer at The New Yorker, discovered as he was researching Russia’s “army of well-paid trolls” for an explosive New York Times Magazine exposé published in June 2015.

“The DNC hack and dump is what cyberwar looks like.”

— Dave Aitel, a cybersecurity specialist, a former NSA employee, and founder of cybersecurity firm Immunity Inc., wrote for Ars Technica last week.

“A very interesting thing happened,” Chen told Longform‘s Max Linsky in a podcast in December.

“I created this list of Russian trolls when I was researching. And I check on it once in a while, still. And a lot of them have turned into conservative accounts, like fake conservatives. I don’t know what’s going on, but they’re all tweeting about Donald Trump and stuff,” he said.

Linsky then asked Chen who he thought “was paying for that.”

“I don’t know,” Chen replied. “I feel like it’s some kind of really opaque strategy of electing Donald Trump to undermine the US or something. Like false-flag kind of thing. You know, that’s how I started thinking about all this stuff after being in Russia.”

st petersburg

St. Petersburg, Russia. Flickr/ranopamas

In his research from St. Petersburg, Chen discovered that Russian internet trolls — paid by the Kremlin to spread false information on the internet — have been behind a number of “highly coordinated campaigns” to deceive the American public.

“I created this list of Russian trolls when I was researching. And I check on it once in a while, still. And a lot of them have turned into conservative accounts, like fake conservatives. I don’t know what’s going on, but they’re all tweeting about Donald Trump and stuff.”

— Adrian Chen

It’s a brand of information warfare, known as “dezinformatsiya,” that has been used by the Russians since at least the Cold War. The disinformation campaigns are only one “active measure” tool used by Russian intelligence to “sow discord among,” and within, allies perceived hostile to Russia.

putin-computer

[Read the full story here, at Business Insider]

“An active measure is a time-honored KGB tactic for waging informational and psychological warfare,” Michael Weiss, a senior editor at The Daily Beast and editor-in-chief of The Interpreter — an online magazine that translates and analyzes political, social, and economic events inside the Russian Federation — wrote on Tuesday.

He continued (emphasis added):

“It is designed, as retired KGB General Oleg Kalugin once defined it, ‘to drive wedges in the Western community alliances of all sorts, particularly NATO, to sow discord among allies, to weaken the United States in the eyes of the people in Europe, Asia, Africa, Latin America, and thus to prepare ground in case the war really occurs.’ The most common subcategory of active measures is dezinformatsiya, or disinformation: feverish, if believable lies cooked up by Moscow Centre and planted in friendly media outlets to make democratic nations look sinister.”

Vladimir Putin

It is not surprising, then, that the Kremlin would pay internet trolls to pose as Trump supporters and build him up online. In fact, that would be the easy part. Read the rest of this entry »


France Shuts Down 3 Mosques During Crackdown On Terrorists 

PARIS (AP) — The latest on the recovery from and investigation into the Nov. 13 attacks in Paris that killed 130 people. All times local: 2:35 p.m.

French Interior Minister Bernard Cazeneuve says three mosques have been shut down in France since the Paris attacks as part of a crackdown on extremist activities.

Cazeneuve told reporters it was the first time mosques are being closed in France “on grounds of radicalization.”

One of the mosques, 35 kilometers (22 miles) east of Paris in Lagny-sur-Marne, was targeted by raids early Wednesday, with police seizing a 9mm revolver, a computer hard disc and jihadist propaganda. Cazeneuve said the mosque also had a non-authorized Quranic school….(read more)

Source: Weasel Zippers


‘Where is Putin?’ Rumors and Questions as Russian Leader Drops Off Radar

Russia-Putin

Whispers in Moscow about a leader’s health are nothing new

Moscow (AFP) – Where is President Vladimir Putin? The Kremlin was forced Thursday to insist the Russian leader was in good health as rumours swirled online over his week-long absence from the public eye.

“There’s no need to worry, he’s absolutely healthy.”

— Putin’s spokesman Dmitry Peskov

Putin was last seen in public on March 5 when he met with Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi and, ever since he postponed a trip to Kazakhstan this week, Russians have grown increasingly curious about what their usually omnipresent leader is up to.

The 62-year-old nurtures a fit, tough-guy image and rarely takes time off.

Grand_Kremlin_Palace,_Moscow

“There’s no need to worry, he’s absolutely healthy,” Putin’s spokesman Dmitry Peskov told Echo of Moscow radio station on Thursday.

“As soon as the sun comes out… and it starts smelling of spring, people start getting delusions.”

— Dmitry Peskov, to Echo of Moscow radio station

Putin also postponed a meeting to sign an alliance agreement with the leader of the Georgian breakaway region of South Ossetia, and did not show up at a meeting of the FSB security agency.

Peskov said the agreement with the rebel region may be signed next week and that Putin’s attendance at the FSB meeting was not planned.

He said Putin was busy with Russia’s economic crisis and has “meetings constantly, but not all meetings are public.”

Asked if Putin’s handshake remains firm, Peskov laughed and said: “It breaks your hand.” However he evaded a question on when Putin would next be seen on television. Read the rest of this entry »