Former Art Teacher Jessica Antoinette Jones Pleads Guilty to Sodomy of Former Student

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Jessica Antoinette Jones, 33, taught art in Springfield Public Schools for eight years, starting in 2006.

Jessica Antoinette Jones, 33, withdrew her previous plea of not guilty and entered the new plea the same day she was scheduled to go on trial for the two felony charges.

A sentencing hearing has been scheduled for March 3 in front of Greene County Judge Calvin Holden. Jones faces up to seven years in prison on each count.

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“The case was reopened after the girl disclosed she was involved in a sexual relationship with Jones. The police obtained a warrant to check the phone that had been confiscated a year earlier and the photos were found.”

Court records show no written plea agreement has been entered in the case.

Jones was hired by the Springfield district in August 2006 and spent the bulk of her eight-year career at Watkins Elementary. A state database shows she also taught art at Bissett and McGregor elementary schools, Wilson’s Creek Intermediate, the former Study Middle School and the Springfield Option Site, a school on the Great Circle campus (formerly known as Boys and Girls Town).

She was working for the district when she met the girl, a student of hers. It was not clear where she was teaching when they met.

According to court documents, the teen requested to be placed in the foster care of Jones — who completed the necessary paperwork to become a foster parent — and moved into Jones’ home in May 2013. Read the rest of this entry »


Mama Slap: Baltimore County Police Chief’s Wife Charged in Domestic Incident

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WASHINGTON — The wife of Baltimore County Police Chief Jim Johnson is facing an assault charge in what authorities describe as a domestic incident.

The Harford County Sheriff’s Office says Johnson’s wife, Rebecca, has been charged with second-degree assault for an incident on June 1.

According to the arrest report released to WNEW, officers responded to their home in the 1300 block of Marquis Court in Fallston just before 2 p.m. Upon arrival, officers met with Lindsay Johnson, the couple’s 25-year-old foster daughter, according to the Baltimore County Police Department.

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The Johnsons have reportedly cared for their foster daughter since she was about 3-years-old. The department says they became her foster parents through Baltimore City Social Services.

The county police department released a statement to WNEW Wednesday night confirming Johnson’s wife was involved in a domestic incident. “Chief Johnson is deeply concerned about two people he cares about,” the statement says. Read the rest of this entry »


Lost Generation

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Adoption in America has collapsed; here’s what to do about it. 

Kevin D. Williamson  writes:  Adoption is an unexpectedly rare phenomenon in the United States, and that’s a supply-side problem. The United States is the third-most populous country in the world, and each year more than a third of our country’s 4 million births are to unmarried women, but it is estimated that in a typical year the total number of mothers who voluntarily relinquish their children for adoption is fewer than 14,000 — barely enough to make a statistical radar blip on the demographic Doppler. Would-be parents trek to the Far East and mount expeditions to South America because there are so few infants available for adoption in the United States.

At the same time, a half million children languish in foster care, awaiting permanent adoptive homes. There are would-be parents who want to adopt them, too, but this situation is more complex: Older children are less eagerly sought after, and the longer a child is in foster care the less likely he is to find a permanent home. The lot of these foster children has been made worse by years of bad public policy discouraging transracial adoptions — a significant barrier, since most of the couples looking to adopt are white and the children in foster care are disproportionately nonwhite. Supply and demand are wildly out of sync: If we were talking about consumer goods instead of children, we’d call this a market failure. And some of the most incisive critics of U.S. adoption policy are calling for reforms that would make adoption policies look a lot more like a market — that is, a system characterized by free and open cooperation — and a lot less like a welfare bureaucracy.

Read the rest of this entry »