Advertisements

Future of News: Bracing for Next Wave of Technology

New technologies have disrupted news media over the past 20 years — but one report says that’s just the beginning.

Washington (AFP) – If you think technology has shaken up the news media — just wait, you haven’t seen anything yet.

The next wave of disruption is likely to be even more profound, according to a study presented Saturday to the Online News Association annual meeting in Washington.

News organizations which have struggled in the past two decades as readers moved online and to mobile devices will soon need to adapt to artificial intelligence, augmented reality and automated journalism and find ways to connect beyond the smartphone, the report said.

“Voice interface” will be one of the big challenges for media organizations, said the report by Amy Webb, a New York University Stern School of Business faculty member and Founder of the Future Today Institute.

The institute estimates that 50 percent of interactions that consumers have with computers will be using their voices by 2023.

“Once we are speaking to our machines about the news, what does the business model for journalism look like?” the report said.

“News organizations are ceding this future ecosystem to outside corporations. They will lose the ability to provide anything but content.”

Webb writes that most news organizations have done little experimentation with chat apps and voice skills on Amazon’s Alexa and Google Home, the likes of which may be key parts of the future news ecosystem.

Because of this, she argues that artificial intelligence or AI is posing “an existential threat to the future of journalism.”

“Journalism itself is not actively participating in building the AI ecosystem,” she wrote.

One big problem facing media organizations is that new technologies impacting the future of news such as AI are out of their control, and instead is in the hands of tech firms like Google, Amazon, Tencent, Baidu, IBM, Facebook, Apple and Microsoft, according to Webb.

“News organizations are customers, not significant contributors,” the report said. Read the rest of this entry »

Advertisements

[VIDEO] JetPacks Are Finally Real

jetpack

It can reach an altitude of over 6,500 feet and travel at over 65 miles per hour.


Rocketpalooza

Source: Not Pulp Covers


1954 Retrofuture Art from an Unexpected Source: the French Chocolatier Cantalou


NASA: Travel Posters of Fantastic Excursions


The 1953 Studebaker Commander Starliner

The 1953 Studebaker Commander Starliner was influenced by this concept design.


[PHOTO] Vintage Future Car

vintage-future-car


Ford Gyron Syd Mead 1961


This is What People in 1900 Thought the Year 2000 Would Be Like


‘Machines of the Future’: Illustrations from the Encyclopédie de La Vitesse, 1956

future11future22

The Machines Of The Future (Top), The Automobile Of The Future (Bottom) – Illustrations from the French, Encyclopedia Of Speed (Encyclopédie de La Vitesse), 1956. (via Agence Eureka)


Martin Rees: The Post-Human Era is Dawning

TRANSHUMAN

Artificial minds will not be confined to the planet on which we have evolved

Martin Rees writes: So vast are the expanses of space and time that fall within an astronomer’s gaze that people in my profession are mindful not only of our moment in history, but also of our place in the wider cosmos. We wonder whether there is intelligent life elsewhere; some of us even search for it. People will not be the culmination of evolution. We are near the dawn of a post-human future that could be just as prolonged as the billions of years of Darwinian selection that preceded humanity’s emergence.

AI robot Ava in the film Ex Machina. Photograph: Allstar/FILM4/Sportsphoto Ltd./Allstar

AI robot Ava in the film Ex Machina. Photograph: Allstar/FILM4/Sportsphoto Ltd./Allstar

“Our era of organic intelligence is a triumph of complexity over entropy, but a transient one, which will be followed by a vastly longer period of inorganic intelligences less constrained by their environment.”

The far future will bear traces of humanity, just as our own age retains influences of ancient civilisations. Humans and all they have thought might be a transient precursor to the deeper cogitations of another culture — one dominated by machines, extending deep into the future and spreading far beyond earth.

human-robot-hybrid-780x439

“Or they may be out there already, orbiting distant stars. Either way, it will be the actions of autonomous machines that will most drastically change the world, and perhaps what lies beyond.”

Not everyone considers this an uplifting scenario. There are those who fear that artificial intelligence will supplant us, taking our jobs and living beyond the writ of human laws. Others regard such scenarios as too futuristic to be worth fretting over. But the disagreements are about the rate of travel, not the direction. Few doubt that machines will one day surpass more of our distinctively human capabilities. It may take centuries but, compared to the aeons of evolution that led to humanity’s emergence, even that is a mere bat of the eye. This is not a fatalistic projection. It is cause for optimism. The civilisation that supplants us could accomplish unimaginable advances — feats, perhaps, that we cannot even understand.

[Read the full text here, at FT.com]

Human brains, which have changed little since our ancestors roamed the African savannah, have allowed us to penetrate the secrets of the quantum and the cosmos. But there is no reason to think that our comprehension is matched to an understanding of all the important features of reality. Some day we may hit the buffers. There are chemical and metabolic limits to the size and power of “wet” organic brains. Read the rest of this entry »


5 Things to Know About Head Transplants

transplant-brain

A Chinese surgeon is working toward the futuristic medical feat of head transplants—joining the body of one animal to the head of another—as explained in a Wall Street Journal article. Any such operation in humans, which the surgeon says could potentially help patients with broken or diseased bodies, remains far off. Here is what you need to know…(read more)

Mad-Science

[WSJ]


Third Car of the Future: 1970

1970-car

 – 


Jeepers, the 21st Century is Here!

21st


Vintage Futuristic Concept Car

future-car


[PHOTO] Chevy: Self-Driving Concept Car

chevy-concpt

This is Chevy’s Insane New Self-Driving Concept Car


BYTE: Apple Watch Prediction, April 1981


[PHOTO] Vintage Robot: Smoke Break

Robot-smokes


[PHOTO] ‘Futurist’

futurist


ご挨拶、人間!Customers at Some Banks in Tokyo Will Soon be Greeted by a Robot

tokyo-robot


[VIDEO] Wheel of Fortune Host Pat Sajak is a Transhumanist?

Peter Rothman reports: Alex gives a great explanation of transhumanism around the 1:00 minute mark and goes on to win the game. Long time Wheel Host Pat Sajak quips that “we transhumanists have to stick together” at 17:05. The episode aired January 6th in the U.S.

Amazing! Alex’s smile at the end says it all… Read the rest of this entry »


[PHOTO] Someday Everyone Will Have a Computer In Their Home

retro-computer-kitchen-dream


When Can We Take a Vacation to the Moon?

vacaton-moon

spaceexp


City of the Future

city-future


Dream of a New Earth

Dream-of-a-new-Earth

Dream of a new Earth

amazingstoriesmagazine


Firebird III, 1959

Firebird-1959

Firebird III, 1959

x-ray delta one


[PHOTO] The Future Home Computer of 2004

old-computer-thumb

Super Retro


Time Cover: Never Offline

time-never-offline


Vintage Sci-Fi Image of the Day: After Doomsday

After-Doomsday

Ralph Brillhart – After Doomsday

The Science Fiction Gallery


The Next Age of Invention

24_1-jm

For City JournalJoel Mokyr writes:  The statement “everything that could be invented has been invented” is frequently misattributed to the late-nineteenth-century American patent commissioner Charles Holland Duell. The Economistonce credited him with the remark, and sites such as “kool kwotes” still reproduce it. In fact, Duell believed the opposite. “In my opinion,” he wrote at the turn of the century, “all previous advances in the various lines of invention will appear totally insignificant when compared with those which the present century will witness. I almost wish that I might live my life over again to see the wonders which are at the threshold.” While this prediction turned out to be on the money, the belief that “the end of invention” is near is very much alive in our age, despite ample evidence of accelerating technological progress.

“Most states today realize that peaceful interstate competition in the marketplace requires staying current with the most advanced technology—but terrorists and rogue states want to stay current, too, for very different reasons…”

Pessimism is most prevalent among economists such as Northwestern University professor Robert J. Gordon, who expects growth to slow to a small fraction of what it was in the past. Gordon predicts that the disposable income of the bottom 99 percent of Americans will grow at just 0.2 percent per year—one-tenth the average rate of U.S. economic growth in the twentieth century. Innovation, he maintains, will not be enough to offset the headwinds that will buffet Western industrialized economies in the next half-century—aging populations, declining educational achievement, and rising inequality. And he is not alone in this dismal view. In The End of Science, published in 1996, journalist John Horgan declared that “the modern era of rapid scientific and technological progress appears to be not a permanent feature of reality, but an aberration, a fluke. . . . Science is unlikely to make any significant additions to the knowledge it has already generated. There will be no revelations in the future comparable to those bestowed upon us by Darwin or Einstein or Watson and Crick.”

“The argument that “if we don’t do this, someone else will” should prove more powerful than the concerns of groups that regard a new technology with suspicion.”

Certainly, it is difficult to know exactly in which direction technological change will move and how significant it will be. Much as in evolutionary biology, all we know is history. Yet something can be learned from the past, and it tells us that such pessimism is mistaken. The future of technology is likely to be bright. Read the rest of this entry »


Vintage Sci-Fi Illustration of the Day

future-city

vintagefuture


Vintage Japanese Illustration of the Day: ‘Captain Ultra Station in the Universe’

Captain Ultra Station in the Universe Silver Star

Translated: “Captain Ultra Station in the Universe – Silver Star”

 


Vintage Sci-Fi Illustration of the Day

City of the Future by Tim Hildebrandt

City of the Future by Tim Hildebrandt

vintagefuture


Will we ever want to have sex with robots?

Is this really the future of human-robot relations?

Is this really the future of human-robot relations?

By Tim BowlerBusiness reporter, BBC News

Meet Roxxxy the sex robot with a triple XXX. Depending on your view ‘she’ is either at the cutting edge of the human-robot interface, or a modern reflection on some men’s difficulties in relating to real-life partners.

While sex aids are nothing new, what makes Roxxxy different is “we’ve taken artificial intelligence” and “combined it with a human form,” says creator Douglas Hines.

Of course, humanoid robots have been the stuff of science fiction for decades – ever since Fritz Lang’s 1927 film Metropolis, or Isaac Asimov’s I Robot stories.

The reality is somewhat more clunky.

Read the rest of this entry »