Carlos Santana Talks Reuniting Santana IV, New Band With Wayne Shorter, John McLaughlin & Herbie Hancock

 reports: Carlos Santana is getting closer to the finishing the Santana IV project, which reunites members of the 1971-72 lineup of the band. But that’s not the only band he plans to launch in 2015.

“Definitely spring recording and summer touring in Europe and maybe America. Can you hear it? It’s kind of like playing with, sharing music with Albert Einstein and Stephen Hawking, ’cause Wayne and Herbie, they’re at that level of genius, genius, genius, genius.”

The guitar legend tells Billboard that he and his wife Cindy Blackman Santana are forming a jazz fusion group called Supernova that will also include saxophonist Wayne Shorter, keyboardist Herbie Hancock and guitarist John McLaughlin.

“I’m just grateful that they accept it and want to do it. And every time I play with Cindy, it goes viral. People go crazy. The energy between Cindy and I is very, very supernova.”

“Definitely spring recording and summer touring in Europe and maybe America,” Santana says of their plans. “Can you hear it? It’s kind of like playing with, sharing music with Albert Einstein and Stephen Hawking, ’cause Wayne and Herbie, they’re at that level of genius, genius, genius, genius. I’m just grateful that they accept it and want to do it. And every time I play with Cindy, it goes viral. People go crazy. The energy between Cindy and I is very, very supernova.”

[Read the full story here, at Billboard]

That said, Santana acknowledges being a bit skeptical as to how well a group like Supernova will play in his homeland. “America is still into ‘Tutti Frutti’ and that kind of stuff,” he says. Read the rest of this entry »


[PHOTO] Miles Davis and Ron Carter, 1967

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Ron Carter came to fame via the second great Miles Davis Quintet in the early 1960′s, which also included Herbie Hancock, Wayne Shorter and Tony Williams. Carter joined Davis’s group in 1963, appearing on the album Seven Steps to Heaven and the follow-up E.S.P., the latter being the first album to feature only the full quintet. It also featured three of Carter’s compositions (the only time he contributed compositions to Davis’s group). He stayed with Davis until 1968 (when he was replaced by Dave Holland), and participated in a couple of studio sessions with Davis in 1969 and 1970.


Herbie Hancock by Johanna Goodman

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themaninthegreenshirt


Herbie Hancock and Miles Davis, Amsterdam 1964

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[AUDIO] Friday Night Jazz: Miles Davis’ ‘Seven Steps To Heaven,’ 1963 – Full Album

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Hat tip/Paulo Ricardo

  • Miles Davis – trumpet
  • George Coleman – tenor saxophone on “Seven Steps to Heaven”, “So Near So Far”, “Joshua”
  • Victor Feldman – piano on “Basin Street Blues”, “I Fall in Love Too Easily”, “Baby Won’t You Please Come Home”, “So Near So Far” (alternative), “Summer Night”
  • Herbie Hancock – piano on “Seven Steps to Heaven”, “So Near So Far” (master), “Joshua”
  • Ron Carter – bass
  • Frank Butler – drums on “Basin Street Blues”, “I Fall in Love Too Easily”, “Baby Won’t You Please Come Home”, “So Near So Far” (alternative), “Summer Night”
  • Tony Williams – drums on “Seven Steps to Heaven,” “So Near So Far” (master), “Joshua”

Background

After the unfinished sessions for Quiet Nights in 1962, Davis returned to club work. However, he had a series of health problems in 1962, which made his live dates inconsistent and meant that he missed gigs, with financial repercussions. Faced with diminishing returns, by late 1962 his entire band quit, Hank Mobley to a solo career, and the rhythm section of Wynton KellyPaul Chambers, and Jimmy Cobb to work as a unit. The departure of Chambers especially was a blow, as he had been the only man still left from the original formation of the quintet in 1955, the only one never replaced.

With club dates to fulfill, Davis hired several musicians to fill in: Frank Strozier on alto saxophone and Harold Mabern on piano, with George Coleman and Ron Carterarriving early in the year. For shows on the West Coast in March, Davis added drummer Frank Butler, but when it came time for the sessions, Davis jettisoned Strozier and Mabern in favor of pianist Victor Feldman. With a lucrative career as a session musician, Feldman declined Davis’ offer to join the group, and both he and Butler were left behind in California.[10] Back in New York, Davis located the musicians who would be with him for the next six years, Herbie Hancock and Tony Williams; with Carter and Coleman, the new Miles Davis Quintet was in place. Williams, then only 17 years old, had been working with Jackie McLean, and Hancock had already scored a hit single with “Watermelon Man“, done by percussionist Mongo Santamaria.

The assembled group at the April recording sessions finished enough material for an entire album, but Davis decided the uptempo numbers were not acceptable, and redid all of them with the new group at the May sessions in New York. Two of the ballad tunes recorded in Los Angeles were old – “Baby Won’t You Please Come Home” written in 1919 and a hit for Bessie Smith in 1923, while “Basin Street Blues” had been introduced by Louis Armstrong in 1928. None feature Coleman; all are quartet performances with Davis and the rhythm section. Read the rest of this entry »


[VIDEO] Herbie Hancock & Omar Hakim: ‘Call it 95’ LIVE ‘Dis Is Da Drum’

Album : Call It 95

Herbie Hancock – Piano

Jeff Lorber – Keys Bruce Hornsby -Keys

Omar Hakim – Drums

Check out Call It 95 at Amazon.com

 

 


[VIDEO] Charlie Haden & Gonzalo Rubalcaba: Nightfall


Horace Silver Dead: Jazz Pianist Dies at 85

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“He not only defined the first steps in the style, he wrote several of its most durable staples, ran bands that embodied and transcended the idiom and perfected a piano manner which summed up hard bop’s wit and trenchancy and popular appeal.”

For Variety,  writes: Jazz pianist Horace Silver, synonymous with Blue Note Records when hard bop — a style he helped pioneer — became the label’s bread and butter, died at age 85 of natural causes at his home in New Rochelle, N.Y. His son Gregory confirmed the pianist’s death to several news outlets.

Silver, whose association with Blue Note spanned a quarter decade, produced a number of hits for the label beginning in 1955 with “Horace Silver and the Jazz Messengers,” a group that would continue under the leadership of co-founder Art Blakey when Silver split off on his own and crafted an amazingly diverse solo career that mixed jazz, blues, gospel and Latin influences.

Signature works like “The Preacher” and “Song for My Father,” the title track from Silver’s 1965 album, would help steer jazz into into a more soulful, less doctrinaire direction — a style also reflected by many young jazzmen of the day, including Herbie Hancock, Cannonball Adderley and Ramsey Lewis. Read the rest of this entry »


[VIDEO] Herbie Hancock Headhunters LIVE in Japan 2005: ‘Watermelon Man’

[Check out Amazon’s Herbie Hancock selection]

Headhunters ’05 – Watermelon Man – YouTube