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Just Happened: Protesters Successfully Hold off Riot Police in Lung Wo Road with Umbrellas, Barricades

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Only in Hong Kong: Doing Homework While Protesting

Bonus tweet – then came the violins…


FOOD in the KONG with FONG

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[PHOTOS] Hong Kong’s “Cage” Apartments

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From architales’ blog:  The Society for Community Organization (SoCO) has released these overhead photos showing how people live in tiny, cramped Hong Kong apartments to highlight the ongoing housing problems in one of the richest cities in the world. Equal opportunity for participation and fair distribution of social resources is the foundation of human rights. Hundreds of thousands of people are still living in caged homes and wood-partitioned cubicles.

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SoCO took shots of the homes to show just how tight these living quarters are. The aerial perspective is not just an artistic choice; The apartments were so small that they had to be photographed from the ceiling to capture them.

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Hong Kong’s Charlie Brown Cafe

A travel and food blog, Bitten by the Wanderlust Bug, has a great little photo series featuring an unlikely theme for a Hong Kong restaurant. The Charlie Brown Cafe. View the whole series, it’s fun. Here’s some samples:

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Hong Kong Tram Timelapse Video

haonowshaokao writes: I’ve been editing videos from a few years back, trying to get to grips with the massive backlog, and I thought I’d have a go at fixing something I made when I returned to China in 2009 – a timelapse video shot from the front of a tram across Hong Kong Island.

[See also: Why Hong Kong never sleeps]

The original version was ok in terms of general concept, but the juddering effect of the tram’s movement made the thing difficult to watch. In order to fix it I spent an hour or so messing about with the deshaker plugin for Virtualdub and then another hour masking the resultant odd framing in Sony Vegas, brightening up the picture a little, making it look pleasantly odd.

The result is quite a bit better, I think, though it’s difficult to know if you’re improving things when you apply a series of minor changes one by one. Sometimes that just means you’re slowly ruining it.

…here’s the original, in case anyone wants to compare & contrast:

 haonowshaokao


The Crazy Streets of Kowlon-Hong Kong

From Crazy yet Wiseswera writes:  Kowlon is the other part of Hong Kong across the harbor. You can visit it by a boat, train or taxi. We decided to try the metro for the first time because it was close to our hotel, so why not? We walked around 15 minutes to the Wan Chi station and from there we got 2 single tickets to Tsim Sha Tsui station. We reached our destination in 10 minutes and from there we started walking and exploring the city.

http://crazyyetwise.com/2013/10/21/the-crazy-streets-of-kowlon-hong-kong/

Image Credit: swera – Crazy yet Wise

Everything was closed around 10 am which was a shock. Later on, we came to know that they open around 11 or 11:30 am huh?! We kept on walking until we found Starbucks (All their local cafes are closed), we sat down, rested our legs and drank coffee, and waited til the shops opened.

http://crazyyetwise.com/2013/10/21/the-crazy-streets-of-kowlon-hong-kong/

Image Credit: swera – Crazy yet Wise

We went to many places which I will talk later on in separate posts such as: The Symphony of Lights show, The Avenue of Stars, 1881 heritage and The Ladies’ Market. But for now, enjoy the pictures of the crazy streets of Kowlon which are very very very crowded but have lots of life and action.

Nice work! See MORE from this sample of photos at Crazy Yet Wise


In Hong Kong, Protests Against New Citizen’s Movement Crackdown

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As the government of China continues its crackdown on civil society actors, especially those who have publicly endorsed or claimed membership in the New Citizen’s Movement, human rights activists gathered in Hong Kong to do something many like minded Chinese citizens are forbidden from doing within the Chinese mainland under the 1989 Law on Assemblies, Processions, and Demonstrations: engage in collective action to express their grievances. A small coalition of rights groups from Hong Kong, including the Chinese Human Rights Lawyers Concern Group, and the Hong Kong Alliance in Support of Patriotic Democratic Movements in China, organized the demonstration for a few days before the Chinese Mid Autumn Festival. Read the rest of this entry »


Powerful typhoon kills 20 in southern China, swipes Hong Kong

People watch waves hit the shores as Typhoon Usagi approaches in Shantou

People watch waves hit the shores as Typhoon Usagi approaches in Shantou Credit: Reuters/Stringer

HONG KONG  (Reuters) – A powerful typhoon hit Hong Kong and the southern China coast on Monday, killing at least 20 people on the mainland, crippling power lines and causing flooding and gale force winds.

Typhoon Usagi, the strongest storm to hit the Western Pacific this year, began pounding the Asian financial center late on Sunday. More than 370 flights were canceled.

The No. 8 signal warning remained in force early on Monday, with financial markets closed for at least part of the morning. The weather observatory said the storm had weakened from “super” typhoon status and that it would consider lowering the warning signal before 10 a.m. (0200 GMT)

China’s National Meteorological Centre issued its highest alert, with more than 80,000 people moved to safety in Fujian province and authorities deploying at least 50,000 disaster-relief workers, state Xinhua news agency reported. Read the rest of this entry »


UPDATE: Typhoon veers away from Hong Kong, hits southern China

Sept. 22, 2013: Dark clouds hang low over Hong Kong's Victoria Habour. Usagi, the year's most powerful typhoon had Hong Kong in its cross-hair on Sunday after sweeping past the Philippines and Taiwan and pummeling island communities with heavy rains and fierce winds. The typhoon was grinding westward and expected to make landfall close to Hong Kong late Sunday or early Monday. (AP)

Sept. 22, 2013: Dark clouds hang low over Hong Kong’s Victoria Habour. Usagi, the year’s most powerful typhoon had Hong Kong in its cross-hair on Sunday after sweeping past the Philippines and Taiwan and pummeling island communities with heavy rains and fierce winds. The typhoon was grinding westward and expected to make landfall close to Hong Kong late Sunday or early Monday. (AP)

HONG KONG –  The year’s most powerful typhoon slammed into southern China on Sunday evening, forcing hundreds of flight cancellations, shutting down shipping and putting a nuclear power plant on alert after pummeling parts of the Philippines and Taiwan with heavy rains and fierce winds.

Typhoon Usagi veered away from Hong Kong at the last minute and made landfall northeast of the former British colony. Forecasters had warned earlier that it posed a “severe threat” to the southern Chinese city.

Usagi — Japanese for rabbit — was classified as a severe typhoon, packing sustained winds of 109 miles per hour, with gusts of up to 132 mph. Read the rest of this entry »


Hong Kong Customs Nets Record Cocaine Haul, Seizing 60 Kilograms of the Drug

Hong Kong customs seized a record haul of cocaine at its international airport this week, foiling two passengers who tried to smuggle 58 million Hong Kong dollars (US$7.5 million) worth of the drug in their luggage.

One 35-year-old man arrived Tuesday from São Paulo, Brazil, after transiting in Beijing with 48 kilograms (105 pounds) of cocaine wrapped in quilts inside his suitcases, the largest amount ever seized from an individual passenger in the city’s history. A 22-year-old female traveler on the same flight was also discovered to be carrying 12 kilograms of cocaine inside false compartments of four backpacks stowed in her suitcase. They two were arrested and charged with drug trafficking.

Not including Tuesday’s cases, customs officers have seized more than HK$50 million worth of cocaine at the airport this year, found sewn into jacket linings or stuffed into shopping bags and laptop cases. On Monday, airport customs officers found about HK$1.92 million worth of the drug inside layers of silicone rubber, which were in turn tucked inside handbags, two cushions and a wall map shipped by air mail from Uruguay.

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