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‘Goodfellas’ Directed by Martin Scorsese

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[PHOTO] Gangster Wife Conceal Carry

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“I know there are women, like my best friends, who would have gotten out of there the minute their boyfriend gave them a gun to hide. But I didn’t. I got to admit the truth. It turned me on.”

Lorraine Bracco as Karen Hill in Martin Scorsese‘s Goodfellas, 1990


Who Tells the Best Jokes? Neurotic, Aggressive Jerks

Joe Pesci's character in "Goodfellas" fits all the criteria for "funny."  Photo: Everett Collection

Joe Pesci’s character in “Goodfellas” fits all the criteria for “funny.” Photo: Everett Collection

Kyle Smith  writes:  ‘Man alone suffers so excruciatingly in the world,” said Friedrich Nietzsche, “that he was compelled to invent laughter.”

This was a landmark moment in comedy, because exactly two seconds after Nietzsche said this, the atomic wedgie was invented by the boy standing behind him in the middle-school lunch line.

[Goodfellas is in the Martin Scorsese Collection at Amazon]

Today science is looking for better explanations of comedy than existential suffering, cognitive scientist Scott Weems says in his book “Ha! The Science of When We Laugh and Why

Along the way, comedy researchers have stumbled upon surprising truths. For instance, lawyer jokes were almost nonexistent in the 1950s, whereas today more than 3,000 websites are dedicated to attorney mockery. Jokes about cleanliness (“Why do Italian men wear mustaches? To look like their mothers.”) don’t work in Europe, where nobody thinks it’s odd if you don’t shower very often.

[Ha! The Science of When We Laugh and Why at Amazon]

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