Open ‘Safe Places’ in Seattle, King County for Heroin Use, Task Force Says

seattle-heroin

A task force is recommending the creation of sites in King County to provide medical supervision for people using illegal drugs like heroin, which would be the first in the U.S.

Vernal Coleman reports: The task force formed to help fight a heroin epidemic in the Seattle area has recommended the opening of public, supervised sites where addicts can use heroin.

The sites, supported by both King County Executive Dow Constantine and Seattle Mayor Ed Murray, would be the first of their kind in the country.

“If it’s a strategy that saves lives … then regardless of the political discomfort I think it is something we have to move forward,” Constantine said during a Thursday news conference.

Murray said he would support establishing the sites if it can be done “in a way that reduces the negative impacts” on neighborhoods.

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The recommendations released Thursday call for a pilot program to establish two “community health-engagement locations” in targeted areas where users can inject heroin under medical supervision as an alternative to public restrooms, alleys and homeless encampments like The Jungle.

[Read the full story here, at The Seattle Times]

The committee called for putting one site in Seattle, and another outside of the city in an area where a high number of heroin overdoses have been recorded.

“One of the driving ideas behind this is creating a safe space where we can get people the medical, prevention and treatment services already provided elsewhere,” said Brad Finegood, committee co-chairman and assistant director of the King County Behavioral Health and Recovery Division. Read the rest of this entry »


Seattle’s Socialist Experiment: When it Comes to the Impacts of a High Minimum Wage, a Picture is Worth a Thousand Words

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Erin ShannonErin-S-web-103cropw writes: This sign in a Seattle nail salon is a perfect illustration of the unintended consequences of forcing employers to pay an aritificially high minimum wage.

Contrary to the claim that employers can afford to pay their workers more and will just absorb the higher labor costs, Madison Avenue Nail Spa shows what really happens–employers find ways to mitigate those costs.  This business owner has decided to pass the extra costs to consumers.

“All of these employers are doing what they must in order to deal with a mandated wage that is higher than the value of the job.”

They aren’t alone. Ivars Salmon House is also raising prices.  Ivars is also implementing a 17% service charge in lieu of tips.  The Icon Grill in Seattle is taking a different strategy; they aren’t increasing prices, but instead eliminating three weeks of paid vacation. All employees will now only earn one week of paid vacation time; before Seattle’s new minimum wage law went into effect on April 1, some long-time employees of the restaurant received four weeks of paid vacation per year.

From the dustbin of history, the zombie socialists

From the dustbin of history, the zombie socialists

“All employees will now only earn one week of paid vacation time; before Seattle’s new minimum wage law went into effect on April 1, some long-time employees of the restaurant received four weeks of paid vacation per year.”

Then there is Z Pizza–that business is closing in August, leaving 12 workers without jobs.  And long-time Seattle manufacturer Cascade Designs will move 100 of its lowest-skilled manufacturing jobs from Seattle to Nevada. Read the rest of this entry »