CT Scan of 1,000-Year-Old Buddha Statue Reveals Mummified Monk Hidden Inside 

What looks like a traditional statue of Buddha dating back to the 11th or 12th century was recently revealed to be quite a bit more. A CT scan and endoscopy carried out by the Netherlands-based Drents Museum at the…(read more)

Source: Colossal

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Art of the Insane: Historic Archives from British Mental Institutions Go Online

retreat

George Sidebottom suffered from ‘moral and religious delusions’. He was a resident at the center from 1894 until 1912

The paintings, poetry and accounts of cricket matches from British psychiatric patients are among some 800,000 historic documents about to go online as part of a project to digitize mental health records from the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries.

“This partnership will bring some rare and important historical material from a fascinating period of medical history into an open and free online resource.”

— Simon Chaplin, head of the Wellcome Library

The Wellcome Library has been digitizing thousands of documents related to the United Kingdom’s medical history. The organization announced last week that it is partnering with several archives to make a searchable database of texts and images from the York Retreat, St. Luke’s Hospital Woodside, Crichton Royal Hospital, Gartnavel Royal Hospital and Camberwell House Asylum.

[Also see “Disease and the Art of Medical Illustration” at the Wellcome Library]

“This partnership will bring some rare and important historical material from a fascinating period of medical history into an open and free online resource,” Simon Chaplin, head of the Wellcome Library, said in a statement. “Broadening access to such collections is at the heart of the Wellcome Library’s digitization project, and we are delighted that others are joining with us to make this possible.”

The trove will focus on records dating from the 19th century and the 20th centuries, tracking the movement away from institutional care, according to the Wellcome Library. Read the rest of this entry »


Can Severed Heads Live On?

Decapitated Head Speaks 

Gwoeii | Shutterstock.com

                                                Gwoeii | Shutterstock.com

Centuries-old tales have described severed heads that seemed to live on for a few seconds — blinking, changing expressions, even attempting to speak.

During the French Revolution, an executioner reportedly held the severed head of Charlotte Corday (who assassinated politician Jean-Paul Marat) aloft and smacked its cheek. Witnesses claimed Corday’s eyes looked at the executioner, and an unmistakable expression of disgust came over her face.

More recently, in 1989, an Army veteran told of seeing a friend decapitated in a car crash. According to the story, the severed head showed emotions of shock, followed by terror and grief, its eyes glancing back at its separated body.

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