Daniel Payne: Six Unanswered Questions About Ahmed Mohamed’s Clock

Tick Tock, Tick Tock…

 writes: In just over a week, the Ahmed Mohamed clock controversy has become a global phenomenon: the young man brought a homemade clock to school and was subsequently arrested because school officials thought it looked like a bomb, leading to a worldwide outcry and hundreds of thousands of tweets, articles, and words of praise for the boy from Irving, Texas.

Ahmed has received commendation from the likes of Google, Facebook, Twitter, and even the president of the United States. Just recently, his family announced they will meet dignitaries at the United Nations; later, after a jaunt to Mecca in Saudi Arabia, they hope to meet with President Obama.

Mohamed has become an international superstar. But there are nonetheless several puzzling and troubling questions regarding his rise to fame. A great many people who have been mildly skeptical of this story have been denounced as “Ahmed truthers” and as people who are out to conduct a “smear campaign” against an innocent boy. But it’s actually reasonable and even necessary to be a bit skeptical of extraordinary stories such as this. You don’t have to have a vendetta against Ahmed to want the full story on the table, and asking honest questions about such a remarkable news event doesn’t mean you’re out to “smear” this young man.

With that in mind, here are six questions the media should be asking the Mohamed family to clarify some points that badly need it.

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1. Why did Ahmed claim to build the clock if he didn’t actually build it? 

From the beginning we’ve been told that Ahmed—a supposedly creative, clever, inventive young man—threw the clock together from parts in his bedroom in order to “impress” his teachers at school. Ahmed told Chris Hayes he put it together himself. He told the Dallas Morning News that he “made a clock,” elsewhere claimed “I’m the person who built a clock and got in trouble with it,” and claimed that the clock was “[his] invention.”

[Read the full text here, at thefederalist.com]

As it turns out, it’s almost certain he did no such thing. All the evidence points toward the conclusion that Ahmed didn’t build his clock at all, and instead just took apart an old digital clock and put the guts inside a pencil case. If this is true—and it almost certainly is—why did he claim he “built” such a device?

Photographs and videos of his workshop have shown a bench scattered with circuit boards, wires, and other electronic devices. If Ahmed is used to working in such conditions and with the guts and pieces of such technology, he should know the difference between “building” a clock and not building one. So what led him to claim he built something that, for all appearances, he didn’t?

Read the rest of this entry »


UPDATE: Clock Prankster Quits Texas School

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The family of a Muslim teenager arrested after ‘homemade’ clock incident has withdrawn him from the Texas school.

Ahmed Mohamed’s father, Mohamed El-Hassan Mohamed, said he had pulled all his children from schools in the area.

According to Mr Mohamed the arrest had a harmful effect on the teen.

[Also see – President of United States of America fooled by prank]

Ahmed’s arrest has been sharply criticised and the charges against him were quickly dropped.

Ahmed was arrested at MacArthur High School in Irving, Texas, after officials thought the device he brought to school was a “hoax bomb”.

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Ahmed Mohamed ‘Homemade’ Hoax Exposed

“Ahmed said: ‘I don’t want to go to MacArthur,'” Mr Mohamed told The Dallas Morning News on Tuesday. “These kids aren’t going to be happy there.”

[Also see – The Infamous Irving Texas Clock: ‘Homemade’ Claim Effortlessly Debunked]

Ahmed has received numerous enrolment offers from schools, his father said, adding that he wanted to give him a break before making a decision.

[More – Mark Zuckerberg falls for clock hoax]

The entire family is set to fly to New York on Wednesday where United Nations dignitaries want to meet Ahmed.

After that, Mr Mohamed hopes to take his son on a pilgrimage to Mecca in Saudi Arabia. Read the rest of this entry »